Any rumors about a new Nikon 24mm PC-E?

thewarder500thewarder500 Posts: 2Member
edited February 2014 in Nikon Lenses
I was wondering if anyone knows if Nikon or Sigma (since they make good glass) is developing a new tilt shift lens. I really would like to get one but the Nikkor 24mm PC-E out right now is roughly 6 years old and i don't want to buy the old one if something new is going to come out soon.

Im especially worried as to whether or not it will even work on my d600. I feel like i read somewhere that the PC-E lens doesn't work on all the bodies very well that it will hit the grip or something preventing it from its full range of movements. The Nikon version also lacks features that the cannons version 2 equivalent and the Rokinon tilt shift can do, for example shifting both up down and side to side at the same time. From what i understand the Nikon PC-E can only do one or the other.

I would just buy the Rokinon but i hear to many mixed views about the image quality to feel safe enough to purchase it. I wont want to shell out half the cost of my D600 on a lens thats no good. I would also just buy the cannons version 2 but i cant convert the cannon lens to work with Nikon from what i understand. So I basically feel stuck with the PC-E but that lens seems to have its own list of draw backs as well =[ . What would you do just wait and hope? Get the Rokinon or just cry myself to sleep and accept the fact having a tilt shift lens is not meant to be?
Post edited by Msmoto on
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  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,823Moderator
    We have not heard of anything new that will replace the current 24mm PC-E. The lens itself, from those that have owned it and have shared their input on it to us, have spoken very highly of the lens and it's performance. The lens itself has many of Nikon's top features including Nano coating.

    Working with manual lens is a challenge in itself, adding the tilt-shift add another level of difficulty in mastering it. These lens are designed for specific task, such as architectural and product photography.
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • WestEndBoyWestEndBoy Posts: 1,456Member
    You may want to think about the 28mm Schneider that is coming out soon. That can likely tilt vertically and horizontally simultaneously. And there are no "issues" with Schneider glass......except the price.
  • FreezeActionFreezeAction Posts: 374Member
    You may want to think about the 28mm Schneider that is coming out soon. That can likely tilt vertically and horizontally simultaneously. And there are no "issues" with Schneider glass......except the price.
    Amen... The only issue I know of with the Nikon PC-E is that it is only sharp wide open or close to it. Roger at LensRentals.com did a review on both the Rokinon and Nikon. Basically his take was Nikon wide open and Rokinon stopped down. All PC-E glass is manual so I'm waiting on the Schneider. I believe but could be wrong that the Schneider on a D800E would be the cat's meow for one shot panoramas from prints I made with other Nikon quality lenses. Schneider doesn't build consumer junk to my knowledge.

    D5300, 18-140 kit lens, AF-S 50mm f1.8G, D810, AF-S 70-200 F4.Canon 1D MII, Shen Hao 4x5 with a 150 Rodenstock, heavy duty geared Manfrotto tripod, heavy duty Manfrotto monopod, Epson 3880, Epson 7900 all in a mobile digital studio.
  • JuergenJuergen Posts: 315Member
    edited February 2014
    You may want to think about the 28mm Schneider that is coming out soon. That can likely tilt vertically and horizontally simultaneously. And there are no "issues" with Schneider glass......except the price.
    What do you mean by tilting vertically and horizontally simultaneously? The Nikon PC lenses can do that as well.
    I also can not see any issues with sharpness. Those lenses are tacky sharp also at higher apertures.

    One thing I would wish to have in conjuction with PC-E lenses: Nikon Camera Control Pro (or any other software with FULL SCREEN life-view. Mr. Nikon, do you hear me? Why is it so difficult to do that?

    Jürgen
    Post edited by Juergen on
    D4, D800E, Nikon 1 J2, 600 f/4, trinity, PC-E 45, PC-E 24, 105, 50 f/1,8g, 85 f/1,4, Sigma 150-500
  • BlinkingeyeBlinkingeye Posts: 21Member
    Forget the 24mm. The existing lens is fine. How about a 17mm lens to compete with Canon.
  • FreezeActionFreezeAction Posts: 374Member
    I only posted what Roger's remarks were with his testing. I don't own either. He said tack sharp wide open on Nikon and if stopped down was soft. I cannot prove either. He definitely said Rokinon was soft wide open. From what I've read about Nikon you pay extra to get all movements on one plain like the newest 17mm and 24mm TS lenses from Canon. It doesn't break the bank but eliminates a couple of steak night outs.

    https://www.lensrentals.com/rent/nikon/lenses/specialty/nikon-24mm-f3.5d-pc-e

    https://www.lensrentals.com/rent/nikon/lenses/specialty/rokinon-24mm-f3.5-tilt-shift-for-nikon
    D5300, 18-140 kit lens, AF-S 50mm f1.8G, D810, AF-S 70-200 F4.Canon 1D MII, Shen Hao 4x5 with a 150 Rodenstock, heavy duty geared Manfrotto tripod, heavy duty Manfrotto monopod, Epson 3880, Epson 7900 all in a mobile digital studio.
  • FreezeActionFreezeAction Posts: 374Member
    Forget the 24mm. The existing lens is fine. How about a 17mm lens to compete with Canon.
    By all means a 17. With more and more pixels to use a 17 would make a fine panorama in a single shot lens.

    D5300, 18-140 kit lens, AF-S 50mm f1.8G, D810, AF-S 70-200 F4.Canon 1D MII, Shen Hao 4x5 with a 150 Rodenstock, heavy duty geared Manfrotto tripod, heavy duty Manfrotto monopod, Epson 3880, Epson 7900 all in a mobile digital studio.
  • FreezeActionFreezeAction Posts: 374Member
    @ Msmoto
    Do you by any chance have a shot of a landscape with a lot of depth to it as in a long lane or highway? Those shots are definitely sharp but lack the real depth that landscapes often have. A field of wheat is a different animal all together.
    D5300, 18-140 kit lens, AF-S 50mm f1.8G, D810, AF-S 70-200 F4.Canon 1D MII, Shen Hao 4x5 with a 150 Rodenstock, heavy duty geared Manfrotto tripod, heavy duty Manfrotto monopod, Epson 3880, Epson 7900 all in a mobile digital studio.
  • shawninoshawnino Posts: 453Member
    Am I remembering stuff incorrectly, or was the one knock on the 24mm PC-E that is was semi-mandatory to send it in for modification so that you got more freedom and less issues with body clearance? Maybe I'm completely confused.
  • spsfotospsfoto Posts: 11Member
    I think you might be referring to the fact that all the nikon ts lenses tilt and shift sections do not rotate independently of each other. They have to be sent in to be swapped between parallel and perpendicular tilt vs shift. You can do it yourself (I've never done it).
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,165Moderator
    edited January 2016
    Today, I shot an image with the 24 PC Nikkor tilted horizontally, shifted vertically…just as designed by Nikon. However, Nikon really needs to get it together and allow the axes to rotate like the Canon lens. This would allow a choice in parallel tilt/shift or offset by 90 degrees….. I do not know of any of the lenses which will shift in two directions at once, or tilt in two directions at once.
    Post edited by spraynpray on
    Msmoto, mod
  • thewarder500thewarder500 Posts: 2Member
    Sorry, I might have miss worded it but this is what I read about the Nikkor not being able to shift in the same way as cannon or the rokinon can. "As far as function, though, the Rokinon gives everything you would ask: 8.5 degrees of tilt, 12 degrees of shift, rotating base and the shift and tilt axis can be rotated so they are aligned or at right angles to each other. The Canon 24mm TS-E can match all these functions, but the Nikon can’t match the rotations".
    now I don't know if this extra set of rotations matter but hey if the cheap lens has it why not the nikkor, and by god if cannon has it.....lol.
    also does anyone know how much the 28mm Schneider will cost? I was having a hard time figuring it out and if its the lens I saw it looked a tad big...like mini howitzer lol.
  • spsfotospsfoto Posts: 11Member
    Is the schneider This one? If it is I've read that the Nikon is slightly sharper at the edges. That canon mount version is $2.5k usd. Its also smaller and lighter than the Nikon 24 pc-e
  • WestEndBoyWestEndBoy Posts: 1,456Member
    That is an older model. The model we are talking about is coming out later this year according to rumours. If you are not in a hurry, it might be worth the wait.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,165Moderator
    As far as sharpness….look at the examples I posted above. The big issue about the Nikkors is the lack of versatility in not being able to change the tilt axis in relationship to the shift axis. And, this may be the next iteration of Nikkor PC lenses… or I would recommend it.

    For those who are unfamiliar with the use of a view camera, any of these tilt shift lenses will drive you nuts….BTW :D
    Msmoto, mod
  • FreezeActionFreezeAction Posts: 374Member
    edited February 2014
    I still use my 4x5 so the TS/PC lenses look enticing to me, especially the Schneider..
    http://www.borrowlenses.com/product/nikon/Schneider_50_PCTS-Nikon

    I should add that the large diameter is to give you ample image circle for plenty of movement in all directions.
    Post edited by FreezeAction on
    D5300, 18-140 kit lens, AF-S 50mm f1.8G, D810, AF-S 70-200 F4.Canon 1D MII, Shen Hao 4x5 with a 150 Rodenstock, heavy duty geared Manfrotto tripod, heavy duty Manfrotto monopod, Epson 3880, Epson 7900 all in a mobile digital studio.
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 631Member
    True Msmoto, a PC-E lens may drive you up the wall if you are not willing to sit down and at least familiarise yourself with the fundamentals. However, if you do, it is fun to try something out, which ireally warrants that you know a bit about photography basics:) Also, there is something about truly manual lenses...
  • andreasandreas Posts: 2Member
    Any new input to this?

    I dont know what to do about getting a 24mm, but I sure know I dont want to send it to the shop every time I want it rotated so a Nikon lens is not an option. Not for $2000.

    The Schneider looks very good but for $8000 i can buy a Canon mkiii body and a TS lens and a small car ;)

    Do people just switch to Sony and buy Canon TS glass?
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 5,060Moderator
    I'm liking the look of the new Laowa 15mm 1:1 macro with Tilt. Not expensive either. Maybe not what you're looking for though.
    Always learning.
  • DJBee49DJBee49 Posts: 120Member
    andreas.
    You wrote 'I dont know what to do about getting a 24mm, but I sure know I dont want to send it to the shop every time I want it rotated so a Nikon lens is not an option. Not for $2000'.

    I don't quite understand this. I use mine all the time and have never sent it in to any shop.

    If you wish to use tilt in one axis and rise/drop in another, then yes, you would need to get it adapted. I believe that you can do this yourself but in any case, it would be a one time only operation as far as I know. You would be more likely to need this double axis facility if shooting product shots in studio (for instance) but would be unlikely to use such a wide angle lens for this I would think. The 24mm is mainly aimed at architectural and landscape photographers, where it would be rarely necessary to need both axes at the same time. I imagine that this would be more of a problem with the longer focal length TCs.

    It is also very sharp by the way but does fall off slightly at full rise (at least mine does), right at the top edge of frame but it is not a problem at all - you just frame slightly inside the extreme edge. I recommend it highly, even though it is expensive. If you have a use for a PC lens, there really is no other animal that can do the job!
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 2,951Moderator
    Any new input to this?

    I dont know what to do about getting a 24mm, but I sure know I dont want to send it to the shop every time I want it rotated so a Nikon lens is not an option. Not for $2000.

    The Schneider looks very good but for $8000 i can buy a Canon mkiii body and a TS lens and a small car ;)

    Do people just switch to Sony and buy Canon TS glass?
    Dude, it's four screws and less than 5min.
    http://www.achim-sieger.de/en/axis-change-pc-e-nikkor-24mm/
  • andreasandreas Posts: 2Member

    Dude, it's four screws and less than 5min.
    http://www.achim-sieger.de/en/axis-change-pc-e-nikkor-24mm/
    Nice, that looks easy, but kind of impossible outside in the snow/rain.
    But I have to read more about what it actually mean, just heard lots of canon and sony people saying "dont buy the nikon TS lenses" beccause of this non rotating stuff.
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 2,951Moderator
    It's easy, the tilt and shift functions are two separate motions of the lens. They can either be aligned so that the tilting and shifting are parallel or they can be rotated to be 90° apart meaning the shift will be orthogonal to the tilt. Typically you figure out what works for your shooting style and leave it with that.
    This is a good starting place:
    http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/tilt-shift-lenses1.htm

    Traditionally, architectural photography is done with the tilt/shift in parallel and landscape is done with them opposing, so depending on what you shoot, you set the lens for that. Also, traditionally longer focal lengths (45mm or 85mm) are used for landscape vs shorter (24mm) for architecture. This means you would set up each lens differently anyway.
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 631Member
    I have been using my 24mm PC-E lens for 2 years now, and never had to change anything. Like Ironheart says, it is something you set once, and then leave it the f... alone.

    I tried it, but it actually makes it more difficult to use the adjustment knobs, so I put it back...
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