New 50mm hard to attach

LareLare Posts: 46Member
edited May 2013 in Nikon Lenses
So I took advantage of some store credit and got a smoking deal on the Nikkor 50mm f1.8D. It seems a little hard to attach to my D7000. Any of my other lenses (of which I have two!) go on quite easily but the 50mm is noticeably harder to turn the last few degrees than they are. However, it does click into place and operates properly.

Oh ye of more experience than I, is this normal or should I be concerned?

Also, I never noticed this before: When I turn the camera off and uncouple a lens, the green memory access light (on the back of the camera) flashes. It also flashes when I put a new lens on. As I said, I never noticed it before I put on the 50mm. Has it always done this and I just never saw it? (By which I mean, "does yours do this?") Or has the 50mm "done something?"

It's my first experience with a lens that uses the camera body to focus. So far I quite like it.
Post edited by Lare on

Comments

  • JohnJohn Posts: 134Member
    The extra resistance that you feel is (probably) the result of the drive shaft that's used to allow the camera to focus the lens. This is an extra connection and will create more resistance.
    I've heared the same comments about other lenses that work this way so I wouldn't worry.

    I have no idea about the green memory light. I always switch the camera off when changing lenses (so that that there is less charge on the sensors and less dust is attracted). I also don't have a D7000 so it might even be version related.
    I find it very unlikely that the lens would have altered the way your camera works.
    You probably just never noticed it before. Still... I'm sure another D7000 user will provide some help soon.
  • FlowtographyBerlinFlowtographyBerlin Posts: 477Member
    My camera does this too (the led flashing). I think it's to confirm that the contacts are in line or something.
  • FlowtographyBerlinFlowtographyBerlin Posts: 477Member
    The extra resistance that you feel is (probably) the result of the drive shaft that's used to allow the camera to focus the lens. This is an extra connection and will create more resistance
    But the resistance would only come from the pin in the body "scratching" on the lens, so it should be the same resistance as a G lens. The camera is the male connection the D lenses' are part is female. At least as far as I can remember from my D lenses that I sold a while ago. Not correct?
  • turnthedarncranksturnthedarncranks Posts: 116Member
    I have the same situation with my D7000 -- I just got a 50mm D a couple of weeks ago and I have a much harder time putting it on than my kit lenses. I had a similar situation with the 35mm G when I first got it, and over time it's gotten much easier to put on.
  • JJ_SOJJ_SO Posts: 1,158Member
    edited May 2013
    yes the 50's are pretty tight. I solved that with a Q-tipp and just a drop of some magic WD 40 on it. This stuff is protection and resolves oxidation. With the Q-tipp I stroke over the bayonet surface of the lens. Take care for the electrical contacts and the rubber seal. You really don't need much of it, I guess, Nikon did just a too good wash of the bayonets, so it's only steel on steel friction
    Post edited by JJ_SO on
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    Green light on lens change is normal. Happens on all the Nikon's I have. I think it's the computer acknowledging the new CPU lens. Funny how an "off" camera really isn't off. That's why I pull batteries for storage, well one of the reasons.
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,085Member
    The 50mm 1.2 AI-S I tried mounting on my D7000 was pretty tough to mount. I hadn't rotated it all the way in so that the lens release button clicked. When I was changing apertures I nearly dropped the lens when I rotated it too much. After 1 or 2 more attempted mounts, it's a bit easier.
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • LareLare Posts: 46Member
    What I was hoping most to hear was "yep, both those things are normal." That's what I'm hearing and it makes me feel a lot better. I was brought up not to force things to fit when they don't want to. Especially true when dialing with high-dollar, precision goods, so I'm heartened (and thankful) for the help.

  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    edited May 2013
    It's engineered that way because it's the last lens you'll ever need :-)
    Post edited by Ironheart on
  • TaoTeJaredTaoTeJared Posts: 1,306Member
    I'm venturing to guess it is the difference between plastic and metal mounts that feels so different.
    D800, D300, D50(ir converted), FujiX100, Canon G11, Olympus TG2. Nikon lenses - 24mm 2.8, 35mm 1.8, (5 in all)50mm, 60mm, 85mm 1.8, 105vr, 105 f2.5, 180mm 2.8, 70-200vr1, 24-120vr f4. Tokina 12-24mm, 16-28mm, 28-70mm (angenieux design), 300mm f2.8. Sigma 15mm fisheye. Voigtlander R2 (olive) & R2a, Voigt 35mm 2.5, Zeiss 50mm f/2, Leica 90mm f/4. I know I missed something...
  • birdmanbirdman Posts: 115Member
    edited May 2013
    No that's how the AF-D are made. It has everything to do with the aperture ring, which then has to be slid all the way to lowest aperturre to fully engage and read correctly. all three of my former lenses did the same: 50/1.8AF-D, 85/1.8AF-D, and 80-400 AF-D. It's fine, and great glass...although my 85 was much sharper (and sexy). Still a fine looking piece of glass but prefer newer 50's over the older...but NOT the 85s
    .
    Post edited by birdman on
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,085Moderator
    I only have one D lens for my D7000 - my 60mm micro. It slides round easily. The easiest lens to fit on was the 18-105 with its plastic mount. Nikon replaced it while servicing it but it was still very nice and easy to fit. My new 16-85 metal mount is less easy but not stiff - normal I'd call it.

    If I had a lens that was properly stiff to mount I'd return it in case it damaged my body (or created a lot of dust while 'bedding in').

    Funny, but the lenses on my old Olympus OM1 & OM2 fitted like expensive precision items - none of my Nikon lenses have that feel. I have to say I don't like the Nikon F mount also because it turns in the wrong direction IMHO.

    HTH.
    Always learning.
  • FlowtographyBerlinFlowtographyBerlin Posts: 477Member
    I'm venturing to guess it is the difference between plastic and metal mounts that feels so different.
    What? There are lenses with a plastic mount??? Wow! Which ones?

    I actually just now remembered that I had the same issues with my D lenses, I just didn't recall it before. And I did the same thing that JJ_SO mentioned, gently applying a film of WD-40.
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,085Member
    I'm venturing to guess it is the difference between plastic and metal mounts that feels so different.
    What? There are lenses with a plastic mount??? Wow! Which ones?

    I actually just now remembered that I had the same issues with my D lenses, I just didn't recall it before. And I did the same thing that JJ_SO mentioned, gently applying a film of WD-40.
    Most kit lenses. The 18-105, 18-135, 18-55, 55-200 primarily.
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
  • FlowtographyBerlinFlowtographyBerlin Posts: 477Member
    Sorry for the confusion: No I actually wasn't, I seriously didn't know.

    I'm still amazed, mostly about the engineering, I mean that this works and is durable etc. Seriously, it's amazing what can be replaced with plastic these days. I think a friend of mine must have one of these kit lenses, I'll have to check that out.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,085Moderator
    Don't be too quick to dismiss plastic mounts because when cameras get dropped, they tend to be cheaper to repair just because of the plastic mount breaking more easily and they certainly attach and detach easily in use.
    Always learning.
  • FlowtographyBerlinFlowtographyBerlin Posts: 477Member
    Nono, wasn't supposed to sound like I'm dismissing it. That's a good point, the logic that one of two components has to be weaker in case something breaks, so it's not the whole system that is damaged. It reminds me of how the guy from my small home improvement store around the corner told me once that people always ask for those indestructable screws and indistructable screwdriver bits and then wonder why both still wear of if not used properly.
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