Pelican cases...

KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 717Member
edited July 2013 in Nikon DSLR cameras
I often travel between Greenland and Denmark, and need a hard case for the most essential gear. I have my usual backpack, but need something which is not as big, and which I can still bring as carry-on, even in the Dash8 which is used here in Greenland.

What I consider most essential is; D800 w. 50mm and battery pack, 14-24mm, 24-70mm, 85mm, SB-900 (all lenses with their respective hoods). I also need to bring the usual collection of cables, chargers, and stuff.

What would a good sized Pelican case be, possibly with wheels and handle? The www.peli.com site has a lot of options, and I am looking for experience...
«1

Comments

  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    I have flown on many a Dash8 and the biggest issue I see is that a standard carry-on sized bag/case will not fit in the overhead, so all carry-on luggage is gate checked. Can you confirm? Do you want something to fit in the undersized overhead or are you willing to gate check?
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 717Member
    We can have carry-on, but need to stow under chair on front. The domestic flights here are usually 60-120 min., so it works out with smaller cases...
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    So what are the size requirements?
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 717Member
    That's what I do not know... As long as it is FAA carry-on approved, then I can take it, but it shouldn't be bigger than to cover my needs (see above). What are other Pelican users using? I think the 1510 and the 1560 are nice, but it difficult to gauge if they will fit my array of gear...
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,313Moderator
    edited July 2013
    I had two Pelican cases as saddle bags on a bike I rode across the US a few years ago. They are indestructible almost. Highly recommended, and make certain to get the ones with the foam included.

    The Pelican 1510 Carry on case is the perfect carry on as it meets all the airline requirements and has wheels. One can use a high density "closed cell foam", aka kayak foam, for the internal protection. Cost is about $150 to $160 on Amazon with foam.
    Post edited by Msmoto on
    Msmoto, mod
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 717Member
    I have found a place that'll make the cutouts in the foam according to my specs, is that preferable as supposed to cutting it out yourself (which I can imagine is a pain in the rear)?
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,313Moderator
    To cut the foam you first freeze it.... or if you are using the closed cell "kayak" foam, this cuts easily with a sharp filet knife. Hole saws work nicely for the lens spots.
    Msmoto, mod
  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    @Killerbob: I have not tried any of the Pelican cases, thus I cannot say much about them. Having said that I own the Lowepro Pro Roller 200. It is a fantastic case that meet all my needed and I can carry it on the plane to fit in the overhead. You may want to look into their line of products and see if it will work for you.

    Happy shopping....
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 717Member
    @Golf007sd: I specifically want a hard case, because I want to be able to check it in at the plane, not at check-in, but at gate. Here domestically we fly Dash8 and sometimes the space for carry-on is limited.
  • FlowtographyBerlinFlowtographyBerlin Posts: 477Member
    @Killerbob: They provide the interior dimensions on the site, one attempt could be to line up all your gear next to eachother in the manner you see the case packed on the picture in bottom row on the right on the product page, and measure if that fits within those dimensions.

  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    @Killerbob, what I was trying to tell you is that that the 1510 or any other FAA approved case, will not fit in the overhead on a turboprop, and will certainly not fit under the seat. If you are okay with gate check that is what you will have to do every time. The 1510 will be allowed as carry-on on a jet. The 1560 is always checked as baggage and is never carry-on.

    See:
    http://www.pelican.com/airline_allowance_medium2.php
    http://www.pelican.com/airline_allowance_large.php
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,313Moderator
    @Killerbob

    I suggest you contact the carriers you travel with and determine the size limitations directly from them. This will eliminate any problems.
    Msmoto, mod
  • BesoBeso Posts: 460Member
    @Killerbob

    I suggest you contact the carriers you travel with and determine the size limitations directly from them. This will eliminate any problems.
    +1!

    Occasionally a decent image ...
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 5,404Moderator
    Ironheart's links give all that information nicely condensed.
    Always learning.
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 717Member
    Of course you never fly just one airline, especially not when getting off the beaten track, and I'll stick to something withon normal FAA guidelines, which is also valid in Europe. Even if it won't fit in an overhead compartment, at least they won't make you check it in... Worst-case scenario is a gatecheck, which in my experience means you get the carry-on back immidiately when off-boarding. Hence I got the Peli 1510 Carry-On.

    What I wanted to know was if anyone else are using Peli cases, and their experience with packing these with Nikon gear, especially the D800 w. battery grip, the 14-24mm, and the 80-400mm, as these particular items are a bit different in size. I.e. can the D800 w. grip stand up in the Peli 1510? I also have the RRS L-bracket on it, so it's borderline according to measurements....

    I ordered the 1510 with dividers, the photography lid insert, as well as the laptop insert, and just to be sure, I also got the foam insert package, so I can make my own padding.
  • Benji2505Benji2505 Posts: 511Member
    I have the 1510 and the D800 will stand in it. The 14-24, the 24-70 and the 105 micro will stand in the 1510 as well. I have the dividers that you can pick out in precut pieces and that works well. The cases are waterproof.

    You have a life time warranty on them. We shipped some machined parts through the nation with Pelican cases and when UPS broke the hinges or the top they were replaced for a new piece no questions asked, even not after it happened multiple times.
  • scoobysmakscoobysmak Posts: 214Member
    I will add my two cents on this, I know it can be quite a challenge to get the right case. I have a pelican 1510, 1500 and 1450. I do not use the foam, I put all my lenses in lens pouches (I use tamrac and I carry a tamrac belt so I can attach my lenses to it, but that's me). I did this so when my equipment changes I can change on the fly and not have the trouble of buying foam and cutting it out, just be warned this is not the cheapest solution unless you buy a few rounds of foam. I put the belt in my luggage and not with my camera equipment.

    In the 1450: Can fit a D700 17-35mm, 24-70mm, 50mm, SB700, (2) SB 400's, (3) pocketwizzard TT5's, a TT1, and an AC-3. The D700 does not have a battery grip, and this is a pretty much no room to spare (cables have to be neatly packed).

    I would not try the 1500 because one side is beyond the FAA carry on size. I don't use it for camera equipment so really never tested what it could hold.

    The 1510 is my go to case, the biggest of them so I can carry more gear and it has wheels so I don't have to carry it (the other two cases I have have to be carried). Your required list should easily fit in this case but be careful because you can start to go over the weight limit for a carry on (I have never been checked but could see airlines start checking this, being a hard case it adds to the weight but no way to get around this). On your smaller planes I have had to gate check this case, not my favorite thing but I can trust my case to make the trip.

    Hope that helped some.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 5,404Moderator
    I wonder if yous guys are really up to date with airline carry on sizes/weights because those lists are not complete and don't have the real trouble makers on them. By that I mean if you look at British Airways, they have a healthy attitude towards carry-on sizes and weights, but if you don't spend that kind of money and go for Ryanair you will find the sizes are slashed as are the weights. Any of the European budget airlines are tighter than BA, Ryanair is the worst of the lot IME. I chose a Lowepro Nova 200AW because it was the only thing that I could carry on the budget airlines but that doesn't mean it will always be permitted. Heck, I hear they are even going to charge if you need a pee!
    Always learning.
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 717Member
    Yet another reason not to fly Ryanair. I must admit, and this is not to sound stuck-up in any way, but I avoid the budget carriers like the plague. I only have bad experiences with the likes of Ryanair and Air Berlin, poor service and worse track record. Also I travel enough that I have selected Star Alliance as the only affiliation I use. Unfortunately only Air Greenland services Greenland (good ol' monopoly), and I have to use them as well.

    Back to the Peli cases; thanks for the advise here given, I am sure the 1510 will serve me well, and wonder why it has taken me this long to get one. Good to know it will fit my gear, and is FAA certified as well.
  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member
    Just to prevent any future misunderstandings, there is actually no such thing as "FAA certified" or "FAA approved" luggage (despite misleading marketing messages). In the US, each airline is free to formulate its own carry-on baggage policy which is codified in the airline's operating specifications.

    Almost all airlines allow carry-on luggage of at least 45 linear-inches in size (typically 14" x 9" x 22") or in metric, 115 linear-cm. The Pelican 1510 was designed to fit right up to this 45 linear-inch limit, so it is a good choice for a carry on.
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 717Member
    edited August 2013
    I got my Peli 1510, as well as the TrekPak inserts. In addition to the normal Photographers insert for the lid, I also got the Laptop insert, which will be useful for traveling. It is great, fits my needs, but boy it gets heavy.

    I am able to fit D800, 14-24mm, 24-70mm, 50mm, 85mm, 80-400mm, and 105mm. I then switch between SB900/flash-kit and the 80-400mm depending on need.

    IMG_14562
    Post edited by Killerbob on
  • kkanuckkkanuck Posts: 25Member
    edited August 2013
    Very Nice @Killerbob.

    Did you cut out the foam yourself? What is the red tape for I see in the picture?

    I too want to get this 1510 Pelican case, and was wondering if the solid foam for interior, or the preset adjustable dividers with velcro is the better way to go? @MsMotto also mentioned kayak foam. Has anyone had both types and can comment on which type is best? I would be sometimes carrying different items, so that is why I am not sure. Thanks for any insight.
    Post edited by kkanuck on
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 717Member
    edited August 2013
    @kkanuck; take a look at http://www.trekpak.com/, that'll explain everything...

    Don't bother with the std. inserts from Peli, it is the standard velco crap and the solid foam may be OK, but the TrekPak is so much better...

    Only grief with TrekPak is that it takes ca. 1cm on all sides.
    Post edited by Golf007sd on
  • kkanuckkkanuck Posts: 25Member
    edited August 2013
    @Killerbob, thanks for the tip, so TrekPak insert consumes 1 cm in foam on all sides is the grief, but gear is better protected I would think.
    Post edited by kkanuck on
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 717Member
    edited August 2013
    It does take a bit of space, but the panes are thinner, and it is so easy to configure. You lay out the camera, lenses, and bits, and put the panes in, connect with the pins, and it's ready to go.

    I don't know if it's better, but it's certainly more adaptable. And, as you can more easily adjust according to needs, perhaps it is more protective.
    Post edited by Killerbob on
Sign In or Register to comment.