Any nikon DSLR show focal length in the Viewfinder?

wmscyclonewmscyclone Posts: 56Member
edited November 2013 in Nikon DSLR cameras
I have a D600 and would often like to know what focal length the zoom lens is at when looking through the viewfinder, similar to the way it shows Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO.

Do any of the current Nikon DSLRs show the current focal length in the viewfinder?
Thanks.
D600, Nikkor Lenses: 24-120 f/4G, 70-300 f/3.5-5.6G, 50 f/1.8G, 300 f/4E, TC-14E III

Comments

  • kyoshinikonkyoshinikon Posts: 411Member
    Negative from what I know... I never thought about it but now that I do I wonder why there isn't an option for that. Probably lack of demand but they still have it listed on the body of pro lenses.
    “To photograph is to hold one’s breath, when all faculties converge to capture fleeting reality. It’s at that precise moment that mastering an image becomes a great physical and intellectual joy.” - Bresson
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,098Member
    That information is not available in the viewfinder, or any other means without looking at the lens. It is interesting that it is not possible, considering that the lens sends that information via the CPU to the camera (as noted in EXIF data).
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • kyoshinikonkyoshinikon Posts: 411Member
    That information is not available in the viewfinder, or any other means without looking at the lens. It is interesting that it is not possible, considering that the lens sends that information via the CPU to the camera (as noted in EXIF data).

    My Sb900 knows the focal length as it will display it on the screen...
    “To photograph is to hold one’s breath, when all faculties converge to capture fleeting reality. It’s at that precise moment that mastering an image becomes a great physical and intellectual joy.” - Bresson
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,098Member
    Yes, but how many people have a SB unit on the camera at all times?
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    What a great question….. but, I am unable to think why I would want this. In most cases I can tell by where I have moved the zoom ring. And, I can see gluing a small piece of foam or tape to the zoom ring for a tactile marker if one wants the information.
    Msmoto, mod
  • wmscyclonewmscyclone Posts: 56Member
    I would find it useful when using the 24-120 zoom just to know what kind of distortion might occur, particularly when shooting portraits on vacation. It's obviously in the EXIF data. I might notice that I'm shooting a picture at 34mm and think that it could be more flattering if I zoomed up to 50mm or more without having to lower the camera and look at the lens itself. It would also be useful with my 70-300 that is pretty sharp at 200mm, ok at 250mm, and soft at 300mm. It's easy to feel that stop at 300mm, but otherwise you have to drop the camera far from the eyes to see the lens scale.

    I don't want information overload in the viewfinder, but it seems like this would be easy to implement with any of the newer lenses (probably any with a cpu). Since I can set a button to change the viewfinder's exposure scale into a virtual level, it would be nice to press a button and see which focal length is currently in use.

    I think it being linked to a button would also be good for the times we use primes and know the focal length is not changing, or otherwise don't care about FL.
    D600, Nikkor Lenses: 24-120 f/4G, 70-300 f/3.5-5.6G, 50 f/1.8G, 300 f/4E, TC-14E III
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,200Moderator
    edited November 2013
    @wmscyclone: If you are going to zoom for least distortion, then you may as well give up on zooms and use primes.

    Just let your software auto correct your distortion and zoom to compose.
    Post edited by spraynpray on
    Always learning.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    Tactile info is useful, unless we have gloves on our hands. I am sitting with my 24-120 in my hand and would suggest placing a piece of gaffer's tape on the zoom ring about 3 cm to the left of the 120mm mark. Then when viewing through the finder, the left thumb can find the tape and you will know where the zoom is.

    I might suggest that after a period of time…one will select the focal length based upon many factors and in most cases with a zoom, it is about what I see in the viewfinder and not any particular number.
    Msmoto, mod
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