Metering manual lenses on consumer grade DSLRs

NukeNuke Posts: 64Member
edited December 2013 in General Discussions
Does anyone know why metering manual lenses in manual mode on consumer grade DSLR cameras does not happen/work?

It seems to me the hardware is there and all that is required is the visual display and firmware to do it? I'm not even suggesting a manual lens database like on the higher end cameras. Just a simple light meter display like on the old SLRs.

I get the feeling this is a deliberate removal so people are forced to buy a more expensive camera if they wish to use the older lenses. I don't like to think that and I'm wondering if there could be a better reason?

Comments

  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,337Member
    You suspicions are correct, deliberately disabled.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    It's missing the hardware to understand where the aperture ring is set, correct?
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,337Member
    Yes, entry level DSLR's lack the AI metering tab. Of course non-CPU lenses meter just fine in liveview.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • NukeNuke Posts: 64Member
    It's missing the hardware to understand where the aperture ring is set, correct?
    Is that not needed only if you use aperture priority?

  • NukeNuke Posts: 64Member
    Of course non-CPU lenses meter just fine in liveview.
    I don't remember that on my D5100? Are you sure? I tried a few of my old Canon lenses (with adapter) using both the viewfinder and liveview and I don't remember seeing a light meter display in either?

    It's possible I had some display setting set wrong?

  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,337Member
    Oh you wont see the light meter, but if you use manual mode you can see the exposure.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • NukeNuke Posts: 64Member
    edited December 2013
    Ah yes. Very true but question is about the light/exposure meter display on the consumer grade DSLRs. The viewfinder and rear LCD have the ability to show a light meter. It seems Nikon decided not to read out the data from the appropriate sensor and show it in the display device. As I see things, it's a matter of some software being deliberately left out?
    Post edited by Nuke on
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,191Member
    Well if there's no tab to take the aperture of the lens, it's very hard to get a good meter. I used to put a 50mm 1.2 AI-S on the D40. The photos came out fine and if you weren't in a rush it's not a big deal, just guess at the exposure, you'll figure out the exposure eventually. It was a real pain to manually focus though, because the viewfinder is so small.
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    edited December 2013
    I suspect Nikon has a group of individuals who do marketing. And, one of the key concerns is what does a consumer get for any specific amount. It is rather like a car purchase. Options come in packages often, requiring A/C to get power windows, etc.

    If Nikon had all the features of the D4 in a D5100…..they would no doubt loose D4 sales. It is really difficult for me to see how a D4 can cost 10 times as much as a D5100…..
    Post edited by Msmoto on
    Msmoto, mod
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,191Member
    I suspect Nikon has a group of individuals who do marketing. And, one of the key concerns is what does a consumer get for any specific amount. It is rather like a car purchase. Options come in packages often, requiring A/C to get power windows, etc.

    If Nikon had all the features of the D4 in a D5100…..they would no doubt loose D4 sales. It is really difficult for me to see how a D4 can cost 10 times as much as a D5100…..
    Weather sealing, built in grip, extra buttons, XQD slot, front command dial, and audio recording for notes. All that engineering has to go somewhere.
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • NikonMickNikonMick Posts: 41Member
    Nuke wrote, in the manner of many conspiracy theorists using this forum:

    ;)

    "I get the feeling this is a deliberate removal so people are forced to buy a more expensive camera if they wish to use the older lenses."

    Untrue, in my humble opinion.

    It's relatively simple to use older, manual focus lenses on the entry level D-series cameras, simply by looking at the histogram on the LCD display and then making adjustments to get your preferred output.

    Mick
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,337Member
    Or just turn on liveview...
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,191Member
    Nuke wrote, in the manner of many conspiracy theorists using this forum:

    ;)

    "I get the feeling this is a deliberate removal so people are forced to buy a more expensive camera if they wish to use the older lenses."

    Untrue, in my humble opinion.

    It's relatively simple to use older, manual focus lenses on the entry level D-series cameras, simply by looking at the histogram on the LCD display and then making adjustments to get your preferred output.

    Mick
    The D7000 isn't too expensive now, if you're willing to buy used.

    I used a D40 once with a 50mm 1.2, the viewfinder was so small it made focusing a chore. I liked the smaller package, but it was not fun.

    Exposure wasn't so bad, you can check your exposure immediately anyway. I can see EXIF being a problem though if you own more than one manual lens.
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
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