D5300 Lenses for a newbie?

2

Comments

  • dissentdissent Posts: 1,305Member

    Would I need an ultra wide angle like the Tokina to take long exposure shots of the stars? I realized there's a dock that goes into the lake and I'm pretty sure the view from there at night is awesome. So yeah, I thought of throwing that into the bag of "things I'd like to do" while I'm here this winter..
    Have a look at this thread for lens use for star shooting -
    http://forum.nikonrumors.com/discussion/1436/lens-suggestion-for-night-photography-with-a-nikon-d7100-/p1

    - Ian . . . [D7000, D7100; Nikon glass: 35 f1.8, 85 f1.8, 70-300 VR, 105 f2.8 VR, 12-24 f4; 16-85 VR, 300 f4D, 14E-II TC, SB-400, SB-700 . . . and still plenty of ignorance]
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    edited December 2013
    +1 tc1983
    If you are building a newbie kit for ~$1500 I wouldn't spend more than $150-200 on a tripod/head combo. SLIK comes to mind, but really any reasonably sturdy will do. You can use it as a backup if/when you decide to upgrade.
    Post edited by Ironheart on
  • henrik1963henrik1963 Posts: 561Member
    I would consider a one lens kit to start out with - in the beginning it is important to keep it simple. You don't want to carry to much and you don't want to change lenses all the time. Keep your focus on getting some good pictures.

    A D5300 + a Nikon 16-85 + a decent tripod. That kit will do most things well.

    No zoom lens is perfect. But some are better than others. The 16-85 is the only lens that will give you a decent wide end without spending money on a special lens for landscapes. Later on you can get a 70-300 and you will be good to go for many years.

    As for tripod. Buy a good carbon tripod or buy no tripod at all. I have a Manfrotto carbon tripod and it is light and strong. It will last a lifetime. I also have a Manfrotto alu tripod - I newer use it - it is to heavy to carry around.

    If you decide to skip the tripod buy a good flash - SB 700 or SB910 - for indoor shots it is much better to use a flash than to boost iso to some insane level.

    Best of luck
  • proudgeekproudgeek Posts: 1,422Member
    The trouble with photography is that when you start out you never know how deeply it's going to get its hooks into you. The thought of buying relatively inexpensive gear to start out is a good one, especially if you think your interest is only going to go so far. However, if it grabs you (and everyone here will bear me out), you're going to end up spending A LOT more money. So yes, I would say, start with a modest budget and see where your interest goes.
    Just out of curiosity, which resort will you be working at?
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    D5300 lenses for a newbie…..the thread……so, now for my "tripod" comments…LOL

    Difficult decision, but with tripods, lenses, bodies, it is all about the budget. An inexpensive lens can produce quite acceptable results if used at the optimum aperture…wide open or stopped down too much…less good. And, the end product…40" x 60" will in most cases require better equipment.

    As to tripods, used very cautiously, a cheap (less than $100 for head and tripod) can produce the same results as the >$1000 pro equipment. But, the lighter the tripod, the more one may wish to hang weights, avoid wind, allow several seconds from mirror up to exposure, just in general think about allowing the kit to settle down before the exposure is made.
    Msmoto, mod
  • 1990eam1990eam Posts: 11Member
    edited December 2013
    The trouble with photography is that when you start out you never know how deeply it's going to get its hooks into you. The thought of buying relatively inexpensive gear to start out is a good one, especially if you think your interest is only going to go so far. However, if it grabs you (and everyone here will bear me out), you're going to end up spending A LOT more money. So yes, I would say, start with a modest budget and see where your interest goes.
    Just out of curiosity, which resort will you be working at?
    Heavenly! Did I mention I was going to work or did you just guess?

    Wow. Lots and lots of options guys. Seems like everyone has its favorite. I have so many things to pick from now, that I'm not sure if I'm more enlightened or not than before starting the thread. But in a good way! I'm learning tons of stuff from you guys, so thank you.

    I really, really want to try out taking shots of the stars as well. I've read that a f/2.8 is a good place to start and that's what the Tokina 11-16 has (although I've read love and hate reviews of this lens at that aperture setting).

    Would it be too crazy to go for the 18-200 and the Tokina? I'd probably go past my budget barrier when I add the tripod, etc. but hell, I guess I can always sell the Tokina if I don't like it or if I decide I will have no use for it after my time here at the lake is done (which will probably be that way because I live in a crowded, boring city.)
    Post edited by 1990eam on
  • shawninoshawnino Posts: 453Member
    We love spending other people's money. Go for it! :)

    If the Tokina doesn't float your boat at f/2.8 (where bloody near everything will be in focus anyway because you're so wide...), try it at f/4.
  • PhotobugPhotobug Posts: 5,203Member
    Spraynpray said You need to spend $500 minimum (give or take) to get something that is not a waste of money. Remember, they all look like tripods, but they don't all work like a tripod should!

    Totally agree +1. I have seen people spend $50 and one month later they admit they made a huge mistake. Some people I know have had 4 tripods in a few years.

    I did it right and bought a heavy duty one that lasted over 25 years. It was big and heavy and RIGID. Bought a new one and it was so heavy and after one year sold it to a friend and bought a Gitzo CF. Love it. I am also in that +60 category and weight and rigidity is important. :D
    D750 & D7100 | 24-70 F2.8 G AF-S ED, 70-200 F2.8 AF VR, TC-14E III, TC-1.7EII, 35 F2 AF D, 50mm F1.8G, 105mm G AF-S VR | Backup & Wife's Gear: D5500 & Sony HX50V | 18-140 AF-S ED VR DX, 55-300 AF-S G VR DX |
    |SB-800, Amaran Halo LED Ring light | MB-D16 grip| Gitzo GT3541 + RRS BH-55LR, Gitzo GM2942 + Sirui L-10 | RRS gear | Lowepro, ThinkTank, & Hoodman gear | BosStrap | Vello Freewave Plus wireless Remote, Leica Lens Cleaning Cloth |
  • 1990eam1990eam Posts: 11Member
    Someone recommended me to try buying a used lens on a site called keh.com. Do you guys know about it or have experience with that site or any other sites of that kind? Is it safe to buy a used lens? Do they test them or something before putting them up for sale?
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,337Member
    KEH is a reputable site, from all accounts I've read.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    Worth a read. They get pretty good reviews (4 out of 5):

    http://www.yelp.com/biz/keh-camera-smyrna
  • kyoshinikonkyoshinikon Posts: 411Member
    edited December 2013
    While I normally would say "get a 50mm!" Im going to day go with the Tokina 11-16mm and either the 18-200mm or the 70-300mm. Based on what you are shooting there arent many situations whare a mid is going to be your prime focal length.

    As to tripods You can get a good manfrotto for $250ish.
    Post edited by kyoshinikon on
    “To photograph is to hold one’s breath, when all faculties converge to capture fleeting reality. It’s at that precise moment that mastering an image becomes a great physical and intellectual joy.” - Bresson
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,409Moderator
    Be careful about recommendations to get an ultra-wide (like the 11-16) for landscape work. This is not good advice - you don't often need wider than 16 for landscape so you are better off going 16-85 for those shots. Ultra-wides are better for getting close than trying to cram everything in.

    I have the 11-16, had the 16-85 and have the 70-300VR, 50mm1.4 and 60 micro. The 11-16 stays in my bag for landscapes.
    Always learning.
  • tcole1983tcole1983 Posts: 981Member
    I have purchased from Amazon, Adorama, and B&H. Always had good service from all.

    My final thought was if you are getting a lens with VR I would really worry less about the tripod now. Until you know you are going to use it...I really don't think it is worth the money if you aren't going to use it much.
    D5200, D5000, S31, 18-55 VR, 17-55 F2.8, 35 F1.8G, 105 F2.8 VR, 300 F4 AF-S (Previously owned 18-200 VRI, Tokina 12-24 F4 II)
  • PhotobugPhotobug Posts: 5,203Member
    KEH has been around a long time. I have sold lens and cameras to them years ago and just last month they were in town and I did not accept their offer for a film camera and lens.

    For used lens, Adorama & BEH & eBay are good. On eBay, be sure to ask your questions before buying. I have had great luck selling lens on eBay, but I grade very conservatively to the buyer is always pleased with his purchase.
    D750 & D7100 | 24-70 F2.8 G AF-S ED, 70-200 F2.8 AF VR, TC-14E III, TC-1.7EII, 35 F2 AF D, 50mm F1.8G, 105mm G AF-S VR | Backup & Wife's Gear: D5500 & Sony HX50V | 18-140 AF-S ED VR DX, 55-300 AF-S G VR DX |
    |SB-800, Amaran Halo LED Ring light | MB-D16 grip| Gitzo GT3541 + RRS BH-55LR, Gitzo GM2942 + Sirui L-10 | RRS gear | Lowepro, ThinkTank, & Hoodman gear | BosStrap | Vello Freewave Plus wireless Remote, Leica Lens Cleaning Cloth |
  • KnockKnockKnockKnock Posts: 394Member
    18-140 VR DX
    50mm 1.8 AF-S

    The new 18-140 is supposed to be the better of the general walkarounds + decent zooms. It will have no problem creating great landscapes. The 50 is the bargain low light lens, and the 75mm equivalent I find very useful for DX - especially for objects and people.

    I have the 35 1.8, and love it on its own, but in good light when you're not using f/1.8, a decent zoom is good enough, and when I'm in low light, I seem to reach for the 50mm more often.

    A lot of this is just shooting in the dark, so to speak. Photography is development (dang all the puns), it's the journey, you'll find yourself with bags, straps, lenses that you never would have imagined going in. Enjoy the ride.
    D7100, D60, 35mm f/1.8 DX, 50mm f/1.4, 18-105mm DX, 18-55mm VR II, Sony RX-100 ii
  • tcole1983tcole1983 Posts: 981Member
    Oh yeah last piece of advise from me. You don't need it all at one time ;)

    Get the body and a lens. Shoot for a while and then go from there. If you get hooked then you will undoubtedly be buying more gear in the future. But to start a walk around zoom and body are all you need. Add a prime later and see if you like it...get a tripod when you have a chance, flash at some point. But none of those are essential from the start.
    D5200, D5000, S31, 18-55 VR, 17-55 F2.8, 35 F1.8G, 105 F2.8 VR, 300 F4 AF-S (Previously owned 18-200 VRI, Tokina 12-24 F4 II)
  • proudgeekproudgeek Posts: 1,422Member
    edited December 2013
    ^^ Absolutely. You can probably get 80% of the shots you've been talking about just with a D5300 and the new 18-140. Many people, myself included, are guilty of thinking, "If I only had [insert name of piece of gear] I could get [insert type of shot]. The reality is what you or any of us need most are time with the camera and an understanding of how it works.
    Post edited by proudgeek on
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,337Member
    Totally agree. I could get 75% of my shots with a D3200 for that matter. It might be frustrating because I'm used to the higher end bodies, but it would be survivable.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,409Moderator
    My final thought was if you are getting a lens with VR I would really worry less about the tripod now.
    When I was a youngster @tcole1983 I could hold a camera like a rock, but not now. Some young people shake too and then there is those 1/2 second shots and longer for sunrise/sunsets. The OP is a newbie - some newbies can't even press the shutter without moving the camera.

    @1990eam: If you want sharp shots in less than bright light, you'll need a tripod.

    Always learning.
  • 1990eam1990eam Posts: 11Member
    edited January 2014
    OP delivers. Thanks for the help guys. I could find great deals online. Can't wait for my next day off work to try all this stuff out and start learning new things.

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    Post edited by 1990eam on
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,409Moderator
    @1990eam: That is a really EXCELLENT set-up you've got there.

    Enjoy!
    Always learning.
  • 1990eam1990eam Posts: 11Member
    Thank you very much guys! I'm going to upload pictures soon!
  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    Congrats. Enjoy the new gear. :)
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • mikepmikep Posts: 280Member
    Totally agree. I could get 75% of my shots with a D3200 for that matter
    : me 3

    wow look at all those boxes to open, love getting new boxes of things to open !!

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