Nikon 400mm lens gets the lead role in quantum experiment

ChasCSChasCS Posts: 309Member
edited December 2013 in Nikon Lenses
Perhaps some of you may have learned of this interesting "experiment" already. If not, please read on...
Sure is an awesome lens...


Nikon 400mm lens gets the lead role in quantum experiment
April 10, 2013 09:18 by Dragos Pirvu

A team of European scientists will conduct a quantum physics experiment with the help of the International Space Station (ISS) astronauts and a Nikon 400mm lens.

Quantum mechanics has always boggled the minds of scientists. Although there were many other scientists before Max Planck, he was the one who managed a breakthrough in this area, while Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein continued his work.
image
ISS astronauts will modify a Nikon 400mm super telephoto lens, in order to help European researchers to conduct a quantum entanglement experiment.
That “spooky action at a distance” will be finally cracked with the help of a Nikon 400mm lens
Einstein based his photoelectric experiments on the Quantum Theory and this has been one of the most inspired decisions of his life. Nowadays, scientists are ready to take things to the next level, in order to test whether or not quantum entanglement occurs over great distances, as predicted.
The so-called quantum entanglement would allow us to communicate over great distances faster and easier, without the need of WiFi technology. The “next internet” could also be based on the discoveries made by European researchers, but they will have to kickstart the experiment first.
Scientists at the Austrian Academy of Sciences will test photons to see whether they can communicate with each other even though they are separated by a large distance. This fact even made Albert Einstein to describe it as a “spooky action at a distance”.
Minimum effort required to conduct the quantum entanglement experiment aboard the ISS
Astronauts at the ISS would have to perform minor modifications to a camera equipped with aNikon 400mm lens. All the gear is on-board, while the adjustments are easy to make, in order to allow the camera to capture entangled light particles.
The state of the photons will be calculated up six times over a period of several months. Each test will last only 70 seconds, but the ISS needs to pass directly over the Earth-based laboratory.
Researchers are hoping that their quantum entanglement theories will be confirmed. They believe that when a photon changes the direction of its spin, another photon, which is directly linked with the original one, would change its spin direction accordingly, even if the two are more than 270 miles apart from each other.
Enormous implications in next-generation communications and encryption
If it sounds complicated, then scientists will hope that the situation will change soon, thanks to the Nikon 400mm f/2.8G ED VR II AF-S SWM super telephoto lens,
which is going for precisely $9,313.26.
The results of this experiment will open the door to a new kind of internet and satellite-free communication. Additionally, a bunch of militaries are looking to develop “quantum encryption”, which is considered very difficult to crack.

It won't be long now, until I pick up my own 400mm... (New Nikkor 80-400mm anyway) A big Smile ;-) No, not long at all...
D800, AF-S NIKKOR 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR, B+W Clear MRC 77mm, AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR, Sigma DG UV 77mm,
SB-910~WG-AS3, SB-50, ME-1, Lexar Professional 600x 64GB SDXC UHS-I 90MB/s* x2, 400x 32GB SDHC UHS-I 60MB/s* x1
Vanguard ALTA PRO 263AT, GH-300T, SBH-250, SBH-100, PH-22 Panhead
Lowepro S&F Deluxe Technical Belt and Harness ~ Pouch 60 AW 50 AW & 10, S&F Toploader 70 AW, Lens Case 11 x 26cm
FE, NIKKOR 2-20mm f/1.8, OPTEX UV 52mm, Vivitar Zoom 285, Kodacolor VR 1000 CF 135-24 EXP DX 35mm, rePlay XD1080

Comments

  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member
    The main blog had coverage of this:

    http://nikonrumors.com/2013/04/09/400mm-nikon-lens-to-be-modified-at-the-iss-to-capture-photons-sent-from-earth.aspx/

    As I understand it, the experiment was only at the proposal stage and has not yet received approval. But it would be really cool to see this happen!
  • ChasCSChasCS Posts: 309Member
    edited December 2013
    Thanks @Ade, I will look at that link. I was hoping someone here "might like to 'share' info" if they had even
    Just a little more on this topic?

    I find it fascinating and would love to see where it goes if proven correct and these trials show how right Dr.Einstien actually was.

    It always comes back...
    http://nikonrumors.com/2013/03/04/nikkor-80-400mm-f4-5-5-6g-ed-vr-lens-announcement.aspx/
    Post edited by ChasCS on
    D800, AF-S NIKKOR 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR, B+W Clear MRC 77mm, AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR, Sigma DG UV 77mm,
    SB-910~WG-AS3, SB-50, ME-1, Lexar Professional 600x 64GB SDXC UHS-I 90MB/s* x2, 400x 32GB SDHC UHS-I 60MB/s* x1
    Vanguard ALTA PRO 263AT, GH-300T, SBH-250, SBH-100, PH-22 Panhead
    Lowepro S&F Deluxe Technical Belt and Harness ~ Pouch 60 AW 50 AW & 10, S&F Toploader 70 AW, Lens Case 11 x 26cm
    FE, NIKKOR 2-20mm f/1.8, OPTEX UV 52mm, Vivitar Zoom 285, Kodacolor VR 1000 CF 135-24 EXP DX 35mm, rePlay XD1080

  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    The 400mm f/2.8 will be much easier to handle in the ISS….no weight….LOL
    Msmoto, mod
  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member

    I find it fascinating and would love to see where it goes if proven correct and these trials show how right Dr.Einstien actually was.
    Hi Chas,

    The proposed experiment (if successful) would further show that Einstein was wrong.

    Einstein was a critic of quantum mechanics, and in 1935 along with two colleagues he published a paper to discredit this new science by describing the EPR Paradox. Basically the paradox predicts either of two outcomes: a) that particles can interact instantly across great distances (in violation of a principle called "local realism" and Einstein's own theory of relativity); or, b) that quantum mechanics is an incomplete theory.

    Einstein defended the concept of local realism, famously deriding the alternative as "spooky action at a distance".

    However, in the mid-1960s, the Irish physicist John Steward Bell provided a mathematical foundation to test the EPR Paradox. Specifically, Bell's Inequalities predicted a phenomenon called quantum entanglement, which violates the notion of local realism.

    Since then, numerous sophisticated experiments seem to confirm that Bell was correct, that local realism as advocated by Einstein is likely to be wrong, and there really is "spooky action at a distance". However, while these experiments are convincing, they are not conclusive.

    If accepted, the proposal involving the Nikon 400mm lens will be the first experiment ever to test Bell's Inequalities in space, almost 80 years since Einstein first formulated the EPR Paradox.
  • ChasCSChasCS Posts: 309Member
    How very well explained, that was awesome.

    So he was actually of a different belief. I got it wrong. I hope to follow this till the end, for the final analysis.

    Technology never seems to stall or stagnate the way many of yesteryear's great inventions did.
    The digital revolution will also be something looked back on someday, and even it, will be a relic of ancient history too.
    Just as we gaze back to the Bronze and other Age's of time.
    D800, AF-S NIKKOR 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR, B+W Clear MRC 77mm, AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR, Sigma DG UV 77mm,
    SB-910~WG-AS3, SB-50, ME-1, Lexar Professional 600x 64GB SDXC UHS-I 90MB/s* x2, 400x 32GB SDHC UHS-I 60MB/s* x1
    Vanguard ALTA PRO 263AT, GH-300T, SBH-250, SBH-100, PH-22 Panhead
    Lowepro S&F Deluxe Technical Belt and Harness ~ Pouch 60 AW 50 AW & 10, S&F Toploader 70 AW, Lens Case 11 x 26cm
    FE, NIKKOR 2-20mm f/1.8, OPTEX UV 52mm, Vivitar Zoom 285, Kodacolor VR 1000 CF 135-24 EXP DX 35mm, rePlay XD1080

  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    Einstein's famous quote (which is actually a misquote, google it if you care) "God does not play dice with the universe" was his initial response to the idea that quantum physics was based upon probability rather than reality. Einstein had a love/hate relationship with quantum physics ever since :-)
  • ChasCSChasCS Posts: 309Member
    God gave Einstien a very unusual cerebral cortex, with large hard drives and extremely fast processors...
    Wickedly Grinning!

    Einstien also had a very unusual brain, and even at his mature state of life in passing, possessed the brain tissue of a much younger scientist. As well, sections of his brain were much larger than the average~normal human being.
    They have it stored, and sections have been sliced thin and further dissected, reviewed closely, microscopic evaluation.

    I try to Imagine him up on the ISS today?? Enjoying his own Nikon cameras and vast lens collection... Hahaha, yeah!!

    And he'd also know better , than to defect... To Canon!! ;-)



    D800, AF-S NIKKOR 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR, B+W Clear MRC 77mm, AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR, Sigma DG UV 77mm,
    SB-910~WG-AS3, SB-50, ME-1, Lexar Professional 600x 64GB SDXC UHS-I 90MB/s* x2, 400x 32GB SDHC UHS-I 60MB/s* x1
    Vanguard ALTA PRO 263AT, GH-300T, SBH-250, SBH-100, PH-22 Panhead
    Lowepro S&F Deluxe Technical Belt and Harness ~ Pouch 60 AW 50 AW & 10, S&F Toploader 70 AW, Lens Case 11 x 26cm
    FE, NIKKOR 2-20mm f/1.8, OPTEX UV 52mm, Vivitar Zoom 285, Kodacolor VR 1000 CF 135-24 EXP DX 35mm, rePlay XD1080

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