Best way to travel with your photography equipments.

shankawshankaw Posts: 2Member
edited April 2014 in General Discussions
I got a 70-200 f/2.8G ED VR II few months ago, and it's becoming the primary lens. The body is D800. Since the lens is somewhat longer and heavy, I take the lens off from the body before putting it in my bag (cover the body and lens with caps). When on outside, i try to do this in the car so less exposure to dust. Im almost just about keep the lens on the body while transporting in a bag; however bit concern about the accidental pressure that could be directed on the mount-point (between lens and the camera)

Have you any users out there with the same concern/experience and any suggestions?

Thank you
Post edited by shankaw on
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  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,973Member
    There is very little danger of damage to the combo by keeping the lens mounted on the body. As long as the camera bag is well padded I don't think you have any reason for concern.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • ChasCSChasCS Posts: 309Member
    The lens is built tough, so yes, it can stand on its head for extended periods of time. ;-)

    Chas
    D800, AF-S NIKKOR 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR, B+W Clear MRC 77mm, AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR, Sigma DG UV 77mm,
    SB-910~WG-AS3, SB-50, ME-1, Lexar Professional 600x 64GB SDXC UHS-I 90MB/s* x2, 400x 32GB SDHC UHS-I 60MB/s* x1
    Vanguard ALTA PRO 263AT, GH-300T, SBH-250, SBH-100, PH-22 Panhead
    Lowepro S&F Deluxe Technical Belt and Harness ~ Pouch 60 AW 50 AW & 10, S&F Toploader 70 AW, Lens Case 11 x 26cm
    FE, NIKKOR 2-20mm f/1.8, OPTEX UV 52mm, Vivitar Zoom 285, Kodacolor VR 1000 CF 135-24 EXP DX 35mm, rePlay XD1080

  • tcole1983tcole1983 Posts: 981Member
    I never just have my body without a lens attached. I haven't had any problems with mine ever..and my bigger lenses are always attached.
    D5200, D5000, S31, 18-55 VR, 17-55 F2.8, 35 F1.8G, 105 F2.8 VR, 300 F4 AF-S (Previously owned 18-200 VRI, Tokina 12-24 F4 II)
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,027Moderator
    Plus of course the D800 body is full magnesium so it is tough. I reckon that for sure you will have more problems as a result of frequent lens changes than if you leave it on.
    Always learning.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
  • paulrpaulr Posts: 1,174Member
    I believe you are right to have concerns whenever you traveling with camera equipment. In the past there have been stories of the F mount coming away from the body with the lens attached, due to the screws coming loose, from vibration and extra weight of the lens on the body. Rare but it as happened. From personal experience I travel with a light lens on the camera, a 50 mm lens and change the lens I intend to use in a safe environment. I always have concerns when changing lenses with regard to dust! You can of course buy specially designed camera bags made for specific lenses, however in real terms this not always practical when carrying numerous lenses.
    I think the answer is take time in protecting your equipment when filling your camera bag and ensure the lens and camera a well supported and have little movement. It's a worry we all have, but preparation and prevention ensure safety.
    Camera, Lens and Tripod and a few other Bits
  • DenverShooterDenverShooter Posts: 340Member
    Used to leave my D800E attached to my 70mm-200mm F/2.8 all of the time in my bag until I got the 80mm-400mm F/4.5-5.6.

    Carried the D800E attached to my 70mm-200mm F/2.8 for as long as I have had the D800E. Carried it all over Germany. Carried it all over the US. Carried it on dozens of flights jammed in the overhead bins. Not a problem.

    Denver Shooter
  • Vipmediastar_JZVipmediastar_JZ Posts: 1,708Member
    I normally carry the 70-200 with the d800 mounted. However now that I picked up a battery grip i upgraded mesengers bags.
    I have two messenger bags one is by Nikon and one is the Temba DNA 15
    both will accomadate the lens mounted with grip.

    The Tenba can hold the lens and camera standing up and this one works better because the top flap extends unlike the Nikon bag.
    The tenba can also accomade an ipad and laptop at the same time and has a thick shoulder pad that I will be buying a another pad for the other bag.

    Once my child is born i will convert the Tenba into a one d800-70-200 bag and one prime bag. Right now i have it setup for a hospital bag with a flash, flash trigger, extra battery, memory and mic :)

  • FritzFritz Posts: 140Member
    Nikon builds very tough cameras when you get to the level of a D800 and the 24-70 2.8 will take a lot of abuse. I'm something of a walking disaster for cameras: a few years ago I had a strap break and my D3s with 24-70 fell from waist height onto a wooden floor with enough force to bend the F mount. You could then flex the lens in the camera to cause the AF to short and randomly cycle. Nikon repaired the camera and checked the lens to find that the lens was undamaged. I noticed that the D800 and the D4 both have a raised reenforcement around the F mount, so when I fell down a rickety flight of stairs last year the D4 and 24-70 went slithering across a concrete floor into a concrete wall: loss of paint w/o damage. Three weeks ago I fell off the side of a WW2 tank and landed on the D4 24-70: score: two cracked ribs, one blown lumbar disc and no damage to the camera and lens. I somehow think a Nikon in a well padded case will survive almost anything but if you want the most protection perhaps consider a hard shell case with the padding custom fitted to your camera and lens. I suspect then you will have nothing to fear short of a plane crash.
  • paulrpaulr Posts: 1,174Member
    Fritz. So its fair to say, ' Your not accident prone then'.
    Camera, Lens and Tripod and a few other Bits
  • FritzFritz Posts: 140Member
    I should hire myself to Nikon for Beta testing. Let's see, last summer I had a lightning near strike that trashed my computer and two of my four hard drives with only partial recovery of my archives, my D700 was stolen from my truck and I broke two toes when stepped on by a draft horse at an event shoot. Thank goodness I only do this part time, I question if I'd survive being a full time professional. My cameras have been dropped, bumped, and banged and still function perfectly well. Nikon really does build a tough product.
  • PhotobugPhotobug Posts: 4,537Member
    I should hire myself to Nikon for Beta testing. Let's see, last summer I had a lightning near strike that trashed my computer and two of my four hard drives with only partial recovery of my archives, my D700 was stolen from my truck and I broke two toes when stepped on by a draft horse at an event shoot. Thank goodness I only do this part time, I question if I'd survive being a full time professional. My cameras have been dropped, bumped, and banged and still function perfectly well. Nikon really does build a tough product.
    I am happy I don't provide your medical and health insurance. =))

    Glad your okay and yes, you need to be a spokesperson for the durability of Nikon equipment.
    D750 & D7100 | 24-70 F2.8 G AF-S ED, 70-200 F2.8 AF VR, TC-14E III, TC-1.7EII, 35 F2 AF D, 50mm F1.8G, 105mm G AF-S VR | Backup & Wife's Gear: D5500 & Sony HX50V | 18-140 AF-S ED VR DX, 55-300 AF-S G VR DX |
    |SB-800, Amaran Halo LED Ring light | MB-D16 grip| Gitzo GT3541 + RRS BH-55LR, Gitzo GM2942 + Sirui L-10 | RRS gear | Lowepro, ThinkTank, & Hoodman gear | BosStrap | Vello Freewave Plus wireless Remote, Leica Lens Cleaning Cloth |
  • shankawshankaw Posts: 2Member
    Thank you all for your feedback. I've decided to get a better camera bag and keep the 70-200 mounted. Did a lot of research and ran into caselogic slrc bag seems to accommodate/address my needs. @fritz you certainly have done a lot of durability testing on nikon products.
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