Can Shutter Priority Be Used With Long Exp. 1/30sec, 1/15sec, etc.? Will it work?? (Nikon DSLR's)

Ray610Ray610 Posts: 19Member
edited May 2014 in Nikon DSLR cameras

Sorry, I meant 30 seconds, 15 seconds, etc.
Post edited by Ray610 on

Comments

  • Ray610Ray610 Posts: 19Member
    Sorry, I meant 30 seconds.
  • Parke1953Parke1953 Posts: 456Member
    @Ray610, Shutter Priority = you choose the shutter speed.
  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member
    Yes. 30 seconds is the slowest selectable speed in shutter priority or in manual mode, unless you use an external shutter release or intervalometer in "bulb" setting.
  • ThomasHortonThomasHorton Posts: 323Member
    Not sure I understand the question. Are you asking what the slowest shutter speed that can be set? Then the previous responses are correct.

    Or are you talking about problems using shutter priority (camera selectes aperture) where the camera chooses an aperture too small that starts introducing lens diffraction in the picture?

    If you are doing long exposures, and allowing the camera to select the aperture, the avaiable light with the long exposure can force the camera to choose a very small aperture. Using very small apertures can introduce softness in the picture due to the diffraction at these very small apertures.

    If it is this second question that you are asking then one solution is that you may need a Neutral Density Filter, even at night, to allow the aperture to open up so you can get maximum sharpness. You also might want to consider shooting long exposures in manual mode.

    So to answer your question: Yes shutter priority can be used for long exposures, but there is a risk of diffraction softening up the picture.
    Gear: Camera obscura with an optical device which transmits and refracts light.
  • GarethGareth Posts: 159Member
    Why do you want to?

    Isn't it just easier to shoot manual?
  • Rx4PhotoRx4Photo Posts: 1,200Member
    Be the boss. Shoot manual.
    D800 | D7000 | Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 | 24-70mm f/2.8 | 70-200mm f/2.8 | 35mm f/1.8G | 85mm f/1.4G | Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM | Zeiss 100mm Makro-Planar ZF.2 | Flash controllers: Phottix Odin TTL

  • Dredden85Dredden85 Posts: 364Member
    Manual ditto! :-B
    D7000, 18-200VRII | 50 1.8G | SB-900
  • ThomasHortonThomasHorton Posts: 323Member
    Whether you shoot Shutter Priority or manual, diffraction issues in long exposure photography will be the same. Just saying "shoot in manual" does not solve any diffraction issues.
    Gear: Camera obscura with an optical device which transmits and refracts light.
  • MikeGunterMikeGunter Posts: 543Member
    Hi all,

    @Ray610 - A better question to you is what is the purpose?

    Using the camera's meter in whatever mode will give you a aperture/shutter combo - assuming it fits the allowable EV range within the ISO setting.

    You can use any of the camera's meter modes to judge the light and set accordingly.

    If you want to pickup light trails of automobile lights, a bulb setting might be preferable, assuming that you have metered for some other static source.

    Long exposures, especially those after twilight and before dawn, that use motion as an element are quite interesting, and depending on one's experience in photography, aperture and shutter speed relationships are a bit unusual - moving a shop doubles or halves the shutter speed, which at the longer end can be quite a bit.

    Going from 15 seconds to 30 seconds to 1 minute to 2 minutes to 4 minutes...

    My best,

    Mike
  • Ray610Ray610 Posts: 19Member
    Hey, thanks, folks, you've answered my ill-asked question. I was also going for "how accurate" is the camera using long speeds as opposed to a more normal day to day shutter speed. Interested in night shots which have always driven me crazy.
    Thanks again, I appreciate the info.
  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member
    DSLRs with electronically-controlled mechanical shutters are extremely accurate at these long exposure settings.

    The shutter error might be in terms of several milliseconds. But consider that for a 30 second exposure, the shutter can be off by a full 6 seconds and still be within 1/3rd of a stop of the intended exposure.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,427Moderator
    edited May 2014
    If you mean by 'accuracy' do you get reciprocity failure, the answer is no.
    Post edited by spraynpray on
    Always learning.
  • Rx4PhotoRx4Photo Posts: 1,200Member
    Interested in night shots which have always driven me crazy.
    Thanks again, I appreciate the info.
    I think a lot of the mystery and/or confusion behind getting really cool night shots is best remedied by getting out there and shooting and seeing what effect pleases you most. On subsequent outings you'll go with a more informed starting point with regard to shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. Many of us are saying shoot in all Manual in this case because you usually don't want the camera to decide what ISO "it" wants or aperture "it" prefers.
    D800 | D7000 | Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 | 24-70mm f/2.8 | 70-200mm f/2.8 | 35mm f/1.8G | 85mm f/1.4G | Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM | Zeiss 100mm Makro-Planar ZF.2 | Flash controllers: Phottix Odin TTL

  • Ray610Ray610 Posts: 19Member
    I've read "tutorials" out the wazoo, and you guys have made it more clear than any of them. And I thank you very much. I'm almost 70, and have never used a digital camera. My last camera was an F100, and due to eye problems I haven't used it for over ten years. Just had eye surgery, and now can see like I'm 30. Amazing. I'm reading a D610 book (don't yet have a camera) to try and tune my brain synapses in the new direction. You folks helped a few more electrical signals to fire. Thanks again.
  • MikeGunterMikeGunter Posts: 543Member
    Hi all,

    @Ade - Exactly my point. (I just Menandered around it. :\"> A third of a stop hardly matters in real world, although some would argue that it does, and for some it arguably does; printing applications comes to mind as does some film and broadcast, but if one is getting that kind of scratch for their work, they likely have the measuring tools to make the adjustments to get it right for the end product.

    @spraynpray - "reciprocity failure" - that's moniker for a phenomenon of extremely long or extremely short exposure on film that I wonder how many reading this even have experienced it? :-)

    @Rx4Photo - Exposure for know value - Exposure Value - EV - is what it is, but the really tricky part or parts of night photography is as Ade explained it, the not so shadowy values in between.

    Light bulbs casting their lights across an expanse will lose their intensity, like f-stops, half-ing as the light falls upon the area around it. Basically, imagine an area such as a square foot, then backing off the lamp until it falls on 4 square feet - a two stop difference, then 8 square feet, 3 stops, and so forth.

    The meter reads correctly, but the effect that you 'see' might not be what you want, and as Ade put it, the difference in stops at that amount of time isn't so great that some fudging is okay.

    One of the real and measurable problems in long exposures is camera movement. Even a couple of cars driving buy some distance can really make for some blur on the images. This is where a really heavy tripod can make a big difference.

    My best,

    Mike
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