Advice for photographing a deep sea fishing trip

rmprmp Posts: 518Member
edited January 2015 in Nikon DSLR cameras
I am taking a couple of deep sea fishing trips in the next few months and any advice for making photographs, videos, and keeping the cameras safe would be appreciated.
Robert M. Poston: D4, D810, V3, 14-24 F2.8, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200 f2.8, 80-400, 105 macro.
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Comments

  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,082Member
    What sort of trip is this? Will you just be fishing or will you be snorkeling too?

    Have you looked at the Nikon AW1? It's a waterproof interchangeable lens camera, it might work for you.
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    edited January 2015
    I know a sailing photog that uses a cooler to keep his gear dry onboard. Anything that can get wet, will, and anything can fall overboard at any time. My rule for the boat was don't bring anything you cant afford to lose. Or make sure it floats (cameras in a waterproof housing generally do). I've seen it all go down on boats. Watch the first Jaws movie again. One time I caught a bow wave on my skiboat that literally sent a 3 foot wave through the entire boat. The bilge pump was working for a while after that...
    Rent a camera and get extra insurance.

    Post edited by Ironheart on
  • rmprmp Posts: 518Member
    Thanks, NSXTypeR and Ironheart, Our plan is for deep sea fishing -- only. But I doubt we will stick too closely to the plan, we often improvise. I have a GoPro which is sealed, but the image quality is marginal. I tried a AW1 and again the IQ was marginal. I guess it amounts to "get extra insurance."
    Robert M. Poston: D4, D810, V3, 14-24 F2.8, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200 f2.8, 80-400, 105 macro.
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    @msmoto has used these, as have I, and find them quite good for surf splash and a bit of water. Depending on how you set it up, it can float for sure.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/17357-REG/Ewa_Marine_EM_U_A_U_A_Underwater_Housing.html

    image

    Don't forget the cell phone:

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/831318-REG/DiCAPac_WPI_10_YELLOW_WPI10_Waterproof_Case_for.html
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    @rmp
    If I get back to Greensboro in time, I will let you try the Ewa Marine I have......LOL rmp....Bob!
    Msmoto, mod
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,069Moderator
    As a boater I have to tell you that 'holes' can and do open up in all but calm weathers. I have been completely submarine in a 36 foot sailing boat so get a good housing as you need more than splash proof.
    Always learning.
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    edited January 2015
    The ewa is good to 20 meters, I was just indicating my personal use of it. I have submerged it in my swimming pool and it works just fine. As a former boat owner, and frequenter of other peoples boats, I second your observation that anything that can get submerged, will. This is a corollary to Murphy's law. Another favorite of mine is "A little paranoia goes a long way"

    P.S. What's better than owning a boat? Having a friend who owns a boat :-) Having been on both sides of this equation, I know it to be a truism.
    Post edited by Ironheart on
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,069Moderator
    edited January 2015
    Just today when I was helping my brother remove the huge rudder from his sailboat a guy with a boat on the hardstanding next to my brothers said "There are two great days in boating - the day you buy your boat and the day you sell it" LOL! A great big hole in the water that you try to fill with money....

    I was a motor-boater myself (don't have the patience for sailing) but I got fed up with 200-500 mile trips at 1 mpg.
    Post edited by spraynpray on
    Always learning.
  • dissentdissent Posts: 1,268Member
    BOAT - Break Out Another Thousand
    - Ian . . . [D7000, D7100; Nikon glass: 35 f1.8, 85 f1.8, 70-300 VR, 105 f2.8 VR, 12-24 f4; 16-85 VR, 300 f4D, 14E-II TC, SB-400, SB-700 . . . and still plenty of ignorance]
  • rmprmp Posts: 518Member
    edited January 2015
    If I listen to you people, I think I need a submarine. b-(
    Post edited by rmp on
    Robert M. Poston: D4, D810, V3, 14-24 F2.8, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200 f2.8, 80-400, 105 macro.
  • Parke1953Parke1953 Posts: 455Member
    I think you need one of those big plastic balls you get inside and all is safe. :-B
  • rmprmp Posts: 518Member
    OK, I give up, I will use the GoPro and a bathing suit.
    Robert M. Poston: D4, D810, V3, 14-24 F2.8, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200 f2.8, 80-400, 105 macro.
  • Rx4PhotoRx4Photo Posts: 1,200Member
    @rmp It's good to be cautious but not to the point of giving up. You're getting excellent advice here but the last decision is still yours when it comes to your on creativity. I think the GoPro actually does take pretty nice pictures above the water but after having edited some underwater scuba photos for an acquaitence shot with a GoPro there's a lot to be desired with the underwater shots.

    The fact is you never really know what's going to happen once you're on that boat. If you watch "Jaws" or "The Perfect Storm" the night before, then just stay home! But if you have insurance, faith, experience, and a true desire to get the best images then I suggest good preparation and take your gear but keep it to a minimum - I'd definitely take the 14-24 or even rent a fisheye for some awesome images from the tower or flybridge if available.

    For what it's worth, a few weeks ago I did a photoshoot on the beach (saltwater & sand) with occasional mild misty drissle. There are some who are afraid to change lenses on the beach on a dry day much less in the conditions that I was in. But I did a few wise things to protect the gear during lens changes and got it done.

    I like the idea of using a cooler to house your gear - pad it with foam and bungee cord it to something inside the cabin. I wouldn't casually walk around too much with the camera - bring it out, shoot, put it back. When a fish is on, same thing.
    Best of luck and whatever you do, have fun!!
    D800 | D7000 | Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 | 24-70mm f/2.8 | 70-200mm f/2.8 | 35mm f/1.8G | 85mm f/1.4G | Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM | Zeiss 100mm Makro-Planar ZF.2 | Flash controllers: Phottix Odin TTL

  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    Please don't think I was telling you not to bring your gear. I would, but just be cautious. +1 to @Rx4Photo's advice, except I would watch Jaws the night before ;-)
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,082Member
    Thanks, NSXTypeR and Ironheart, Our plan is for deep sea fishing -- only. But I doubt we will stick too closely to the plan, we often improvise. I have a GoPro which is sealed, but the image quality is marginal. I tried a AW1 and again the IQ was marginal. I guess it amounts to "get extra insurance."
    I haven't shot with an AW1, so I'm not sure how good the image quality is. But from what I hear, as a CX sized sensor, it's pretty good. The AW1 is pretty much your most flexible and cheapest option without going into heavy duty underwater housings, which can probably easily run over $500 just for the housing, discounting the lens and camera.
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,069Moderator
    edited April 2018
    I agree on the AW1 except that once you have an UW housing you can get out clicking in any weather. :D
    Post edited by spraynpray on
    Always learning.
  • heartyfisherheartyfisher Posts: 3,172Member
    I would use the the AW1 -- Its a bit clunky compared to a DSLR but it goes anywhere and does a good job taking photos and video... its peace of mind and you can enjoy the fishing and get very decent images.
    Moments of Light - D610 D7K S5pro 70-200f4 18-200 150f2.8 12-24 18-70 35-70f2.8 : C&C very welcome!
    Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.

  • peterppeterp Posts: 1Member
    rmp said:

    I am taking a couple of deep sea fishing trips in the next few months and any advice for making photographs, videos, and keeping the cameras safe would be appreciated.

    You can now buy good, weatherproof covers for your large lenses that will protect the external coating and the electronics of the lens from spray and salt.

    If you are looking for new trips, check out this sea fishing trips website.
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,195Member
    edited April 2018
    Why do you need one of your "good" cameras for still photos? There should be lots of good light on the boat. A cheap, perhaps used, old D3100 or D3200, body with a kit zoom should produce good images in that light. Work with it before you go to see how to set it up so you can use it like a point and shoot. Set it in A mode and f8. Use autofocus so you can quickly and don't have to tell the camera where to focus. Try M mode, f8, 1/200th shutter speed and auto ISO. Try all the modes offered to see what you like using best. Since you most likely will have high contrast set it to Normal or High Active D lighting which will reduce hotspots and bring up shadows a bit. Just find a mode and settings you like which will keep the ISO from going above 400 and can be quickly shot like a point and shoot. Try Active D lighting settings before you go and see how high you can go without looking too odd to your eye. Auto fill flash can be used to fill shadows. Use a filter over the lens. Carry the camera in a belt pouch so you can take it out quickly but also can put it away and keep it from splashes when not in use. Bring a towel to keep in the cabin so you can go inside and wipe it off every now and then. You may have to clean the filter often. Even going back to the 14 megapixel D3100 you will be able to produce good quality large prints. Sometimes the "best" tool is a cheap tool. Bring two along and keep one in the cabin so if one of yours gets soaked you can use the other. Keep a 18-55 on one body for subjects on board. Keep a 55-200 DX lens on the other body if you want to try to catch jumping fish. I suspect those D3100 and 3200 bodies are more robust than most of us think. You can get a D3100 or D3200 with kit lens on e-bay for about $250.00 and probably can find a kit which includes a 55-200 lens. Example: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-D3200-24-2-MP-Digital-SLR-Camera-Bundle-W-2-Lenses-and-Extras/222924333060?hash=item33e7536004:g:uCUAAOSwbYdauvzO I know it is not "macho" to show up with such a dinky camera when you own impressive gear but you will be working in a very confined space with lots of good light and great risk to your gear so disposable gear is a wise choice. Remember, people who view your photos full screen on a computer monitor will only be looking at 2 megapixels. A great 16x20 print can be made from 6 megapixes. 24 megapixels allows for cropping. Why risk damage to a D850?
    Post edited by donaldejose on
  • rmprmp Posts: 518Member
    So far, I 've had three trips: Panama, Costa Rica, and Guatemala. (1 a year) I have used the GoPro on all three: both above and below water. It captured what I needed: basic videos, nothing fancy.

    I have also used a different D on each trip. D800, D810, and D850. All three worked just fine. The D810 needed more cleaning afterward, but it also got hit with the roughest water. The lens had a gritty movement and required cleaning by Nikon to be smooth again. All three produced a picture good enough to hang on some family members wall. (That is a big deal in my family and requires a good print with high image quality.) One print is a 6 foot wide by two foot tall monster (but still good enough for pixel peeping on a metal print.)

    The next trip is this Christmas to the Galapagos. This time my grandson is going. It will be his first marlin fishing trip. Yes, it is wishful thinking, but a sailfish on a fly rod -- Wow.
    Robert M. Poston: D4, D810, V3, 14-24 F2.8, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200 f2.8, 80-400, 105 macro.
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,195Member
    "6 foot wide by two foot tall" Wow, if you are printing that large you do need a D8xx series camera!
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,069Moderator
    If they are stitched pano's he only needs that D3xxx camera...
    Always learning.
  • rmprmp Posts: 518Member
    Both "guess-ti-mates" are partially correct. for that picture I used a D810 with 70-200 f2.8. But, I used it in a vertical format, took x-number of images and stitched them together to make a pano. It could probably been done in a single shot, but I was playing. (Remember, I am playing. I am not a real-photographer, I am not in it for the money, and my subject matter 90% of the time is my family -grand kids.)

    Robert M. Poston: D4, D810, V3, 14-24 F2.8, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200 f2.8, 80-400, 105 macro.
  • rmprmp Posts: 518Member
    If you would name an "iconic" shot or image of the Galapagos Islands,, what would it be? London has Big Ben, Hawaii has Waikiki, Scotland has Edinburgh Castle, etc. What would be iconic in the Galapagos?
    Robert M. Poston: D4, D810, V3, 14-24 F2.8, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200 f2.8, 80-400, 105 macro.
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,195Member
    Galapagos icons: sailboat anchored in a cove to evoke the historical importance of Darwin stopping there to explore and the contribution of what he saw to his theory of evolution: sea iguanas sunning on rocks and leaping into or coming out of the sea; blue footed boobies. Now get all three in one shot and you have accomplished the impossible!
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