Nikon D3000 blurry, unsharp pictures.

lorencakelorencake Posts: 2Member
edited May 2015 in D3x00
I have a Nikon D3000, and it is taking very low quality images. I feel like when I first got the camera the pictures were sharp and focused, and now they seem low-res and blurry. I am trying to figure out if it is an equipment issue (lens?) or if I inadvertantly messed with the settings. Here are some recently snapped photos.... You can see what I mean. Any suggestions?

photo DSC_0067_zpsyimlzhtf.jpg

photo DSC_0069_zpsnpqsyl3x.jpg
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Comments

  • tcole1983tcole1983 Posts: 981Member
    edited May 2015
    Slow shutter speeds, high ISO and diffraction from shooting at F22 and F25. Try a flash, faster shutter speed or get more light somehow. And stop using F22, it isn't necessary. Shoot around F8 for sharpest pictures.

    You are shooting ISO 1600 (which I actually think the camera is handling well for a D3000), shooting 1/15 shutter speeds which is pretty slow, and using high F-stops (F22 and F25). You basically combined everything to degrade image quality here. Try learning some more about all of those aspects and why they are bad.

    Honestly they look pretty good considering your settings.

    Edit:
    Ok answer might have been a bit short and snippy. You need to shoot your lowest ISO...probably 200 on the D3000, shoot at a couple stops under fully open...probably F5.6 or so, and shoot at shutter speeds at least equal to your focal length...IE 1/30 at 30mm. I don't think the shutter speeds are the issue here that much as it usually isn't a problem until you get out past 50mm, but the ISO and F-stop are the biggest problems with your examples.
    Post edited by tcole1983 on
    D5200, D5000, S31, 18-55 VR, 17-55 F2.8, 35 F1.8G, 105 F2.8 VR, 300 F4 AF-S (Previously owned 18-200 VRI, Tokina 12-24 F4 II)
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    What mode/settings are you using?
  • tcole1983tcole1983 Posts: 981Member
    Exif info showed Aperture priority. I had to sneak around a bit and go to the photobucket page to find the info.
    D5200, D5000, S31, 18-55 VR, 17-55 F2.8, 35 F1.8G, 105 F2.8 VR, 300 F4 AF-S (Previously owned 18-200 VRI, Tokina 12-24 F4 II)
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,409Member
    I would shoot portraits like these at the widest aperture possible while keeping all the people in focus, say f4 or 5.6. Then set auto ISO to keep the shutter speed above the focal length. ISO will then float and you should get good results.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,321Moderator
    To give you all the options: If, following the excellent advice given above, you find you really aren't that interested in learning the technicalities of photography, you can put your camera mode dial (on top) to the green position whereby it becomes fully automatic. It will give far better results than you have posted above and is an option for you going forward if you prefer. If you want to learn and find you lose your way but have to get a picture, put it back on that auto position until you have the time to think again.

    Hope that helps @lorencake.
    Always learning.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 2,139Member
    edited May 2015
    I often get to set these up for guests at weddings ..dont use auto use P .go to menu and set auto iso 100-3200 min 1/60 most important sharpness to +9 . Use large for image size but it matters little if you use fine/normal or basic.
    that will give you the best your camera can produce.
    Post edited by Pistnbroke on
  • tcole1983tcole1983 Posts: 981Member
    Here is the Exif info on the bottom picture:
    Camera make:
    NIKON CORPORATION
    Camera model:
    NIKON D3000
    Date/Time:
    2015:05:20 00:27:51
    Resolution:
    2592 x 3872
    Flash used:
    No
    Focal length:
    18.0mm (35mm equivalent: 27mm)
    Exposure time:
    0.067 s (1/15)
    Aperture:
    f/22.0
    ISO equiv.:
    1600
    Whitebalance:
    Auto
    Metering Mode:
    pattern
    Exposure:
    aperture priority (semi-auto)

    And the Top one:
    Camera make:
    NIKON CORPORATION
    Camera model:
    NIKON D3000
    Date/Time:
    2015:05:20 00:27:42
    Resolution:
    3872 x 2592
    Flash used:
    No
    Focal length:
    26.0mm (35mm equivalent: 39mm)
    Exposure time:
    0.050 s (1/20)
    Aperture:
    f/25.0
    ISO equiv.:
    1600
    Whitebalance:
    Auto
    Metering Mode:
    pattern
    Exposure:
    aperture priority (semi-auto)


    - See more at: http://s288.photobucket.com/user/lorencake
    D5200, D5000, S31, 18-55 VR, 17-55 F2.8, 35 F1.8G, 105 F2.8 VR, 300 F4 AF-S (Previously owned 18-200 VRI, Tokina 12-24 F4 II)
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,409Member
    One thing I would recommend to anybody with a DSLR is to fully comprehend focal length, aperture, shutter speed and ISO. Then master how to control the camera in these respects. Devote a weekend to this then you will have 90% of the technical knowledge you will ever need to know.

    Then, seemingly magically, your photos will start to get better and better.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    edited May 2015
    I suspect that the OP would like to gain more knowledge in photography. Many of us have taken instructional courses in photography, (1965, 66...LOL) and this is essential for learning the basics of how it is done.

    My suggestion is to find out if there is a technical school around that offers basic photo instruction, take as much as you can of the courses offered, and you will no doubt be able to capture the images at a quality you desire.

    Lots of information is available on NRF, yet, nothing can match the basics taught in schools.
    Post edited by Msmoto on
    Msmoto, mod
  • lorencakelorencake Posts: 2Member
    Thank you! These are all good suggestions. I am doing some reading and trying various levels of these settings to see what works best. If there's anything else I'm missing please let me know - I am clueless about these things but am eager to learn!
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 2,139Member
    edited May 2015
    The interesting thing is that they are at F22 and I am not quite sure how you got it to that (aperture mode and turned the control wheel ?? )...I dont agree with learning about aperture speed f stop first ..its not 1964....My wife takes brilliant pictures of wedding preperations/service/portraits and groups every week and knows nothing about any of those ..cannot even chanage the D7100 battery ..BUT the camera is set right and she and its computer combine to produce excellent work.
    She is a qualified member of the Royal photographic society (by examination of her work at the Octogon) so she must have half a clue.
    You must first enjoy your photography in P mode and then move forward from that ..(P is an advanced version of auto)
    Post edited by Pistnbroke on
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,409Member
    Sure you will learn framing and composition and if that is all you need to float your boat, then so be it.

    But that seems like such a limiting view.
  • tcole1983tcole1983 Posts: 981Member
    edited May 2015
    Oh pistnbroke. Don't learn anything about why the OP came here to figure out why their pictures were turning out poorly. Hmm I was able to easily point out with my limited knowledge the things that were contributing to the problems. So why not learn what it takes to get sharp pictures or to create bokeh? Not everyone wants a +9 sharpness jpg that has no character. The OP was obviously in aperture mode as pointed out by myself and the exif information I posted...so they obviously had it in a mode and turned the wheel to get f22. Why not learn about diffraction and why you shouldn't shoot at f25 unless you know why you are doing it? A mode is what I use 99% of the time..I almost always want to control my depth of field and adjust the aperture to fit my shutter speeds, bumping the iso to get higher speeds when needed.
    Post edited by tcole1983 on
    D5200, D5000, S31, 18-55 VR, 17-55 F2.8, 35 F1.8G, 105 F2.8 VR, 300 F4 AF-S (Previously owned 18-200 VRI, Tokina 12-24 F4 II)
  • heartyfisherheartyfisher Posts: 3,181Member
    edited May 2015
    LOL I am in P mode 99% of the time.. but I am in there cos i am lazy..

    I do know how to go fully manual when Pmode will not do what I want. Pistnbroke's, suggestion to stay in Pmode has some merit. But a new User can really get into bad habits and blame their gear(or their husband for not being around to fix settings). I would say to a new photographer. LEARN full manual as soon as you can ! DROP INTO P MODE or Scene Modes IF YOU GET FRUSTRATED ! and then look at the EXIF data to learn what the camera did so that you can replicate it in Manual.

    I have done my time in Manual (decades).. P mode for me ;-) ([+/-] and dial to change aperture/shutter).
    Post edited by heartyfisher on
    Moments of Light - D610 D7K S5pro 70-200f4 18-200 150f2.8 12-24 18-70 35-70f2.8 : C&C very welcome!
    Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.

  • tcole1983tcole1983 Posts: 981Member
    @heartyfisher I didn't mean one needs to shoot a certain mode, but more knowing what all the settings do is certainly helpful. I never found p mode useful myself. I use s mode on occasion and rarely full manual. Whatever mode ones uses I think learning why high ISO, high f stop numbers and slow shutter speeds are a disaster waiting to happen. Of course p mode might possibly take away several of those factors, but every mode can force the camera into poor settings that will cause bad results.
    D5200, D5000, S31, 18-55 VR, 17-55 F2.8, 35 F1.8G, 105 F2.8 VR, 300 F4 AF-S (Previously owned 18-200 VRI, Tokina 12-24 F4 II)
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,321Moderator
    I think the really useful advice finished several posts up. Let's not go into confrontation about it.
    Always learning.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 2,139Member
    The guy needs to get the camera working for him or it might go in the bin ..You misread ...get it working right then move on to more understanding. A famous,very expensive pro photographer giveing lectures at B&H was saying he only uses P because he is concentrating on composition..Photography is what YOU want it to be not what you are told by others.I bet 99% of nikons are still used in Auto.
    Even if we shoot in RAW our final product is JPEG its just how you get there.
    Lets hear from the guy ..did you get it sharp????
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 934Member
    Since you are eager to learn I suggest you shoot in full manual and learn about aperture, shutter speed and iso. Buy a book and you should be able to figure it out. Then you can try the other modes and find out what works best for you. It is only a suggestion of course and there are many ways to learn, but this is how I did it.
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