Be Ansel Adams..

http://m.sfgate.com/news/article/Federal-job-opening-Be-the-next-Ansel-Adams-6684473.php

Probably not that fun a job for some.. but what an opportunity for a legacy if you are good.


"Basically, do you want to be Ansel Adams?

If so, the federal government has a job for you: Photographer, GS-1060-11/12 (1564575), Department of the Interior, National Park Service.*

That doesn't sound terribly sexy, but remember, back in 1941, the legendary American photographer contracted with the Department of the Interior to document the nation's rich natural beauty, producing iconic images of our National Parks. *There is a catch: you have to live in Washington D.C."

Moments of Light - D610 D7K S5pro 70-200f4 18-200 150f2.8 12-24 18-70 35-70f2.8 : C&C very welcome!
Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.

Comments

  • DaveyJDaveyJ Posts: 885Member
    I have worked for the federal government. I have never seen residency requirement! Having known Ansel Adams, there will not be another. Henry William Jackson is my favorite of that genre and obviously I never met him!
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,084Member
    I bet you need to have a residency requirement if you want to be an astronaut!
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    I suspect with the proper technique one can do some landscapes which may technically be quite similar to Ansel Adams and the Zone System. But, it is doubtful anyone will ever capture the emotion of the original work. It seems this only happens once.
    Msmoto, mod
  • haroldpharoldp Posts: 984Member
    At GS-13 the kill is bestowed automatically.
    D810, D3x, 14-24/2.8, 50/1.4D, 24-70/2.8, 24-120/4 VR, 70-200/2.8 VR1, 80-400 G, 200-400/4 VR1, 400/2.8 ED VR G, 105/2 DC, 17-55/2.8.
    Nikon N90s, F100, F, lots of Leica M digital and film stuff.

  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,071Moderator
    edited January 2016
    @haroldp - Say what?
    Post edited by spraynpray on
    Always learning.
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,071Moderator
    Ah ok, so GS-13 is a mountain or summat?
    Always learning.
  • haroldpharoldp Posts: 984Member
    pardon my poor typing.

    Having worked for the US Gov't, it is well known that ones skills and knowledge automatically increase with pay grade.
    D810, D3x, 14-24/2.8, 50/1.4D, 24-70/2.8, 24-120/4 VR, 70-200/2.8 VR1, 80-400 G, 200-400/4 VR1, 400/2.8 ED VR G, 105/2 DC, 17-55/2.8.
    Nikon N90s, F100, F, lots of Leica M digital and film stuff.

  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,045Member
    pardon my poor typing.

    Having worked for the US Gov't, it is well known that ones skills and knowledge automatically increase with pay grade.
    In a snivel servants wildest dream!!!
  • haroldpharoldp Posts: 984Member
    I was assured that any GS-13 knew more about everything than any GS-12, regardless of background and training.

    The promotion involves an official epiphany (with epiphany certificate and lapel pin). That is why our wise civil servants can be counted on to manage everything for us with absolute integrity and efficiency,. If you do not believe me, ask them, they will tell you.

    I resigned my government position 35 years ago. My only regret is that I did not do it sooner as I was starting to believe that stuff (and occasionally dribble,) which hurt me socially.

    I feel much better now.

    ... H
    D810, D3x, 14-24/2.8, 50/1.4D, 24-70/2.8, 24-120/4 VR, 70-200/2.8 VR1, 80-400 G, 200-400/4 VR1, 400/2.8 ED VR G, 105/2 DC, 17-55/2.8.
    Nikon N90s, F100, F, lots of Leica M digital and film stuff.

  • DaveyJDaveyJ Posts: 885Member
    Having been a GS 13 briefly (very high pay grade by private industry standards) the federal jobs, like the military jobs higher rank comes at a price.....The National Park Service should just hold photo contests or something like that! No reason whatsoever to hire someone full time. Besides the people's love for the parks is well established. But a residency requirement is uncalled for.
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,045Member
    Why would they give up the opportunity to brag about the job they created just to be efficient?
  • DaveyJDaveyJ Posts: 885Member
    The National Park Service has entered an era of Governmental distrust that will effect every life in the USA. I have asked many people what they think about US direction and our overall situation. I have stopped donating to the National Park Service, and the National Park Foundation as I do not trust where we are going. I believe our National Parks are America's best idea but my sad economic situation as a farmer and because I am at the end of my career and earning days, and I am not sure what will be done in the parks at all....But another government job? Not needed!
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,199Member
    This is the job description. www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/422484300
  • MegapixelSchnitzelMegapixelSchnitzel Posts: 184Member
    And the sad part is if Ansel were alive, in his 30's or 40's, and applying for the job, he probably wouldn't get it in this day and age.
  • vtc2002vtc2002 Posts: 364Member
    @MegapixelSchnitzel I agree with you. IMHO Post processing software has devalued many of the skills that Ansel and other photographers of his day that separated them from the rest of the people with a camera of that time period. I'm not bashing post processing software it is a very valuable part of photography. To many photographers rely on post processing to fix poor execution in the field. Ansel also did a substantial amount of post processing on some of his images but he started with a exceptional image. I would like to think that his ability to see and capture light and his composition skills would still be highly desired skills in a candidate for the job.
  • tc88tc88 Posts: 343Member
    A big part of barrier between Ansel and other lesser photographers at the time was the cost/time associated with film photography. In the film days, one had to take a few pictures, go home and develop, and then realize something needs to be improved. All this involves a lot of time and cost. Besides almost nobody can afford taking as many pictures as Ansel did. Thus in the film age, past experience is king and is difficult to catch up.

    These days, digital capture gives instance feedback and essentially doesn’t have any film cost. So if one is into it, s/he can improve very fast. Many excellent photographers have only been taking pictures for a few years. That’s not possible in the film age.
  • paulrpaulr Posts: 1,176Member
    AA used the best technology available at the time, I am sure if he was still around he would be the first to exploit the virtues of photoshop and all the other available post production softwares. He would probably have a PhaseOne IQ3 XF 100mp camera with all the Schneider lenses too LOL.
    Camera, Lens and Tripod and a few other Bits
  • MegapixelSchnitzelMegapixelSchnitzel Posts: 184Member
    edited October 2016
    paulr said:

    AA used the best technology available at the time, I am sure if he was still around he would be the first to exploit the virtues of photoshop and all the other available post production softwares. He would probably have a PhaseOne IQ3 XF 100mp camera with all the Schneider lenses too LOL.

    Yes! And I can guarantee you Brett Weston would, too!! Mr Adams would've loved LR and PS. I once saw his dodge & burn of Clearing Winter Storm, Yosemite - there are over 100 areas to be attended to make that print... and that is why no two of those made by Adams ever look exactly the same.
    Post edited by MegapixelSchnitzel on
  • DenverShooterDenverShooter Posts: 345Member
    Here is a guy who is still doing it "old school" with big film..

    https://clydebutcher.com

    Technical details

    https://clydebutcher.com/about-the-artist/technical-information/

    Here is a video of him with his 8 x 10 sheet film camera chest deep in the Santa Fe RIver.



    Has to be tough on the tripod...

    My Old Man met him a couple of years back. A fascinating guy.

    Denver Shooter
  • vtc2002vtc2002 Posts: 364Member
    @tc88 It was not until Adams was in his 60's that his fine art photography became popular enough for him to make money. He supported his fine art photography by doing commercial work. He did own some of the best equipment. His photo titled Monolith it is documented in several of his books that taking this photo that he was aware of his poverty. He had 11 glass plates and had all ready shot 9 images when on the 10 image he realized that the yellow filter that he had chosen was not going to darken the sky the way that he had visualized and with his last glass plate he used a red filter and captured the image. I think his ability to visualize and capture images separated him from other photographers of his day. Having the best equipment certainly did not hurt him either.

    @paulr and @MegapixelSchnitzel +1 In 2002 I had the opportunity to shoot some behind the scenes shots for the PBS Series the American Experience that featured Ansel Adams. I (along with about 10 other photographers) had the opportunity to spend most of a day with Michael Adams (Ansel's son) walking through Yosemite to places where his father had taken photographs. One of the photographers asked Michael what his father would think about digital cameras and Photoshop and he said he would be excited and that he would definitely use them. He also said he would still be using his 8 X 10 equipment. I wonder what he would think of the mirrorless cameras.

    @Denvershooter Thanks for posting.
  • MegapixelSchnitzelMegapixelSchnitzel Posts: 184Member
    When I was a young man in law enforcement, I met him and Virginia through one of my Captains in Monterey County Sheriff's Dept. I visited his house at Carmel Highlands a few times in the late 70's with Capt Gilpin - and I sure wish I'd discussed and talked with him a lot more than I did. I found him very pleasant and easy-going and his darkroom astounded me as a young officer who couldn't afford squat. Capt Gilpin, a very accomplished Zone system photographer of the Monterey area, ALWAYS had his Hassy with him, in the department vehicle, ready to go at a moment's notice. I think Ansel would've embraced any and ALL innovations in photography. The more tools, the better.
  • paulrpaulr Posts: 1,176Member
    I believe the patient work learnt from playing the piano and getting it right, held AA in good state to adapt the same principles to photography.
    Camera, Lens and Tripod and a few other Bits
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