Nikon n90s flash

Hey!
I've just got my hands on an old film camera, the Nikon n90s, and I was looking forward getting an external flash for it.
Because it's an old model and i-TTL is misleading in a sense, I figured asking here what kind of inexpensive TTL flash would work with the camera.

Yongnuo YN-565EX looked like a nice option, but it states a minimal amount of supporting units, therefor I'm afraid to take the risk.

Thanks!

Comments

  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,564Member
    You best bet might be to find an older Nikon flash, like an SB-22, 23, 24 or SB-27, which have full compatibility with Nikon cameras from that time period.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • haroldpharoldp Posts: 984Member
    or SB-28
    D810, D3x, 14-24/2.8, 50/1.4D, 24-70/2.8, 24-120/4 VR, 70-200/2.8 VR1, 80-400 G, 200-400/4 VR1, 400/2.8 ED VR G, 105/2 DC, 17-55/2.8.
    Nikon N90s, F100, F, lots of Leica M digital and film stuff.

  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 1,796Member
    edited January 2016
    SB600 is a bad idea for a flash.
    Post edited by NSXTypeR on
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,564Member
    edited January 2016
    The SB-600 and newer flashes are not really compatible with the older film cameras, and only work in "auto" mode. The SB-800 is okay, since it has it's own light meter, but the SB-600 is not a good choice.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • haroldpharoldp Posts: 984Member
    The older flashes use TTL reflected off of the film. Digital sensors are much more reflective and will not work for this. The new flashes (i-ttl) use a pre flash to calibrate.
    D810, D3x, 14-24/2.8, 50/1.4D, 24-70/2.8, 24-120/4 VR, 70-200/2.8 VR1, 80-400 G, 200-400/4 VR1, 400/2.8 ED VR G, 105/2 DC, 17-55/2.8.
    Nikon N90s, F100, F, lots of Leica M digital and film stuff.

  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 2,854Member
    Look for those older flashes on e-bay. That is where I found two of them a few years ago.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 1,251Member
    ..i ttl for the newer cameras no good for your old camera SB 24=28 best cheap choice
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 1,796Member
    The SB-600 and newer flashes are not really compatible with the older film cameras, and only work in "auto" mode. The SB-800 is okay, since it has it's own light meter, but the SB-600 is not a good choice.
    Ah, sorry about that, I'm not terribly familiar with flashes. I deleted my old comment.
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • heartyfisherheartyfisher Posts: 3,119Member
    edited January 2016
    The older flashes use TTL reflected off of the film. Digital sensors are much more reflective and will not work for this. The new flashes (i-ttl) use a pre flash to calibrate.
    I dont think thats how TTL flash worked.. .. Didnt it use the normal sensor under the mirror for that ? the only flash that reflected off the film that I know of are the Olympus OM-10. I thought even the other Olympus used the mirror to pre determine the flash duration.

    Post edited by heartyfisher on
    Moments of Light - D610 D7K S5pro 70-200f4 18-200 150f2.8 12-24 18-70 35-70f2.8 : C&C very welcome!
    Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.

  • haroldpharoldp Posts: 984Member
    @heartyfisher

    The following is taken exactly from Moose Petersens tech tips.

    Nikon first introduced TTL (Through The Lens) flash technology in 1980. The basics of TTL operation is rather simple and applies to all camera systems. With TTL flash exposure, when the shutter is tripped, the light from the flash fires off, racing to hit the subject. This light hits the subject then bounces back to the camera. The light traveling the speed of light, travels through the lens (and any filters which may be attached) and strikes the film plane. The light then bounces down off the film to a sensor which reads the light as it builds up exposure on the film. Once the sensor and the connected computer software determines the light has massed enough for the correct exposure, the camera's computer turns off the flash (just like a light switch in a house goes on-off).


    http://www.moosepeterson.com/techtips/flash.html
    D810, D3x, 14-24/2.8, 50/1.4D, 24-70/2.8, 24-120/4 VR, 70-200/2.8 VR1, 80-400 G, 200-400/4 VR1, 400/2.8 ED VR G, 105/2 DC, 17-55/2.8.
    Nikon N90s, F100, F, lots of Leica M digital and film stuff.

  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 5,367Moderator
    edited January 2016
    I believe Olympus were the first to develop TTL metering off the film plane, but it was before the OM10 (it may have been the OM2) but others copied it.
    Post edited by spraynpray on
    Always learning.
  • haroldpharoldp Posts: 984Member
    Olympus does that often.
    D810, D3x, 14-24/2.8, 50/1.4D, 24-70/2.8, 24-120/4 VR, 70-200/2.8 VR1, 80-400 G, 200-400/4 VR1, 400/2.8 ED VR G, 105/2 DC, 17-55/2.8.
    Nikon N90s, F100, F, lots of Leica M digital and film stuff.

  • GEONYCGEONYC Posts: 4Member
    My favorite is the Metz 24 or any of the older, with built-in light measuring. they are the best for the price... under $60 for most. Also, the Bolt units at B&H or...
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 1,251Member
    edited January 14
    put it in the bin and invest in a more modern digital camera even a D50/70/90 would serve you better
    Post edited by Pistnbroke on
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