85mm 1.8d or 85mm 1.8AFS

sharkeysharkey Posts: 12Member
New to this forum but have searched to no avail; so if not too repetitive a question.

I have just sold my 105macro and want to buy a 85mm portrait lens.

To work on my D800 within tight budget <£400. Second hand - f1.8D or f1.8AFS or new f1.8AFS.

I have read almost every review I can find and major differences seem to be limited to; weather proofing and noise in favour of the AFS with image quality and focus speed/accuracy in favour of the D....

Has anyone user experience of both of these lenses with a full frame Nikon DSLR and if so would they and of course anyone like to comment on the decision.

I have about a week to decide.

Comments

  • heartyfisherheartyfisher Posts: 3,185Member
    edited January 2016
    Which macro? the 105VR? Comment on the decision? :-) errr .. bad decision ...
    The 105 VR is one of the best portrait lenses. Used by many many professional portrait photographers for portraits! but since my comment is really no help.. unless if you can get it back and refund... I will leave it to the people who really know the 85mm well to comment ...
    Post edited by heartyfisher on
    Moments of Light - D610 D7K S5pro 70-200f4 18-200 150f2.8 12-24 18-70 35-70f2.8 : C&C very welcome!
    Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.

  • nukuEX2nukuEX2 Posts: 178Member
    I own 85mm f/1.8 AF S and it is very good lens.
    D7200, 40mm Micro Nikkor f2.8, Lowepro AW Hatchback 16,
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,491Moderator
    edited January 2016
    Hi sharkey, welcome to NR.

    I have not owned either of those lenses, but as regards the D or AF-S question, I can offer you this: I had the 60mm D micro which I eventually swapped for the 60mm G AF-S. I did that because I bought the D to save money (like you). It was a well built lens with fabulous IQ but the focus was terribly slow and noisy. The noise didn't bother me so much, but it was so slow to focus that I lost shots. I shoot live insects and on a hot day they don't hang about. You may be using your 85 for portraits, but the problem may be the same that the model sees the camera come up, expects the normal delay until the image is taken then the magic goes out of the smile or the moment is passed and your old screw drive D is still whirring back and forth looking for focus.

    The money I saved translated into money wasted because I got the AF-S in the end anyway as is the case with a lot of these 'saving money' decisions.

    I see on ebay UK an 85mm G used for £268 buy it now or make offer - I would jump on that if I were you!
    Post edited by spraynpray on
    Always learning.
  • sharkeysharkey Posts: 12Member
    Which macro? the 105VR? Comment on the decision? :-) errr .. bad decision ...
    The 105 VR is one of the best portrait lenses. Used by many many professional portrait photographers for portraits! but since my comment is really no help.. unless if you can get it back and refund... I will leave it to the people who really know the 85mm well to comment ...
    The 105VR macro is correct. Reasons for selling (now sold) are, bulky, cumbersome and very hard for me (very weak hands) to hand hold; mostly used up to now on a monopod so a bit conspicuous in the street - so not an ignorant sale, more one of necessity.
    Hi sharkey, welcome to NR.

    I have not owned either of those lenses, but as regards the D or AF-S question, I can offer you this: I had the 60mm D micro which I eventually swapped for the 60mm G AF-S. I did that because I bought the D to save money (like you). It was a well built lens with fabulous IQ but the focus was terribly slow and noisy. The noise didn't bother me so much, but it was so slow to focus that I lost shots. I shoot live insects and on a hot day they don't hang about. You may be using your 85 for portraits, but the problem may be the same that the model sees the camera come up, expects the normal delay until the image is taken then the magic goes out of the smile or the moment is passed and your old screw drive D is still whirring back and forth looking for focus.

    The money I saved translated into money wasted because I got the AF-S in the end anyway as is the case with a lot of these 'saving money' decisions.

    I see on ebay UK an 85mm G used for £268 buy it now or make offer - I would jump on that if I were you!
    Thank you for the welcome, obliged.
    Not to be argumentative, but the reviews so far put the 'D' ahead of the AFS on focus speed and accuracy. Your point is well made though, perhaps they (reviewers) are wrong? It is really yet another loss on a lens purchase I am trying to avoid so perhaps newer/modern tech is the way to go from a cost POV..

    Thank you both for your responses.

    Regards

    Sharkey
  • starralaznstarralazn Posts: 204Member
    screw drive af speed is largely dependent on the body youre using (although i have not seen a comparison between a d6xx d750 or d800)

    i have the 1.8G and have never had the 1.8D. the few times ive used it(the focal length bores me in general, id rather use a 50, 58, or 105), the focus speed seems fine for normal portraiture. if youre directing someone to hold a pose then focus speed shouldnt be a problem. candids may be another story

    105micro is too heavy? man, im thinking of picking up the 200 f2 for portraits..
  • heartyfisherheartyfisher Posts: 3,185Member
    edited January 2016
    Like @starralazn said the camera body plays a very big part in the AF speed of the AF-D lenses. This is mainly due to the power of the in body motor. However, the AF processing power also plays a part of course but I have never seen any way that that component can be tested. but thats besides the point (lol). Also the gear ratios of the focus mechanisms plays a big part in the AF-D AF speeds.

    Another thing is you cannot assume AFS is always faster than AFD as the motor in the lense may not be very powerful if it is a cheap AFS lense. I dont know the AF Speeds for the 85mm lenses the OP is considering. although I do think that it is possible that the AFD 85mm may be a speedster :-)
    Post edited by heartyfisher on
    Moments of Light - D610 D7K S5pro 70-200f4 18-200 150f2.8 12-24 18-70 35-70f2.8 : C&C very welcome!
    Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.

  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,251Member
    edited January 2016
    The only reason why you may want to get the AF-D version is if you still shoot film cameras and you need the aperture ring. Depending on your needs that may be essential.

    Otherwise I think you'd generally be better off getting the AF-S version of the lenses. I can't think of any lens in which the AF-S version was a poorer version than the AF-D version.

    On a side note, I will chime in that the 105mm macro is a wonderful lens, but it's also the lens that I use the least for the same reasons you mention- it's heavy, bulky, and not convenient.

    In the off chance I do bring that lens along, I love the images I make with it though.
    Post edited by NSXTypeR on
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,675Member
    As fine as the 105 Macro is, it is a compromise when shooting portraits as it is only a 2.8. The extra stop and a half that the 1.8 offers will give you a nice bokeh advantage, offset somewhat by the 105's longer focal length.

    If it was me, I would opt for the AFS, as the image quality is almost as good as my 85 1.4G (AFS). The G is a significant improvement over the 1.4D (which was considered a stellar performer). I would expect a similar improvement with the 1.8 lenses.
  • manhattanboymanhattanboy Posts: 1,003Member
    regards the D or AF-S question, I can offer you this: I had the 60mm D micro which I eventually swapped for the 60mm G AF-S. I did that because I bought the D to save money (like you).
    The 85 AFS would be my vote too for the same reason. You mention that the 105 was hard to hold because of the weight and conspicuous in the street. I think a D800 is going to cause you trouble in this regard. It's relatively heavy with a loud shutter and demands decent glass given the sensor resolution. I can't help but wonder if that type of shooting is your primary goal whether you would have been better off with a mirrorless camera like an Olympus or Fuji, which has excellent primes in a light weight, inconspicuous package. I'm not sure what type of portraits that you do, but I once read an interesting article that said one photag brings long telephotos to his clients to shoot a couple shots. The shots themselves are useless, but the large lenses are used to impress the client how serious the shooting is. :)) What I mean by telling this story is that a large lens on a monopod could have some advantages depending on how you look at it.
  • sharkeysharkey Posts: 12Member
    Thank you all for your comments and advice; the technical, social and psychological.

    I am kind of restricted nowadays in more ways than one, unfortunately. Physically (hands&eyes), financially (retired early) so, the D800 will have to stay. Hopefully although weak my hands; like me generally are large so it doesn't look too out of place. I played with the Fuji XPro1 a while back and was very impressed with its quiet way of capturing everything you point it at; however its size actually works against it for me. Being so lite and relatively small I still needed to support it to prevent the wobbles in any shot that required any length of concentration. Great for speedy snapping but I struggled with the considered compositions. Oh and changing horses now would be too too costly.

    Struggling to navigate through this is certainly concentrating my mind. Throwing money at it is out hence my seeking help and taking my time.

    Looks like the 85mm f1.8 AFS is the way to go for now. I am looking at presetting the aperture and keeping the iso on auto to speed up my & cameras reaction time whilst adding a grip support to help with the hand problem.

    You have all been very helpful and any new thoughts are still very welcome. I am a great distance from my working days and need all the help I can get to keep doing this photography stuff.

    Regards

    Sharkey :))
  • sharkeysharkey Posts: 12Member
    sorry 'bout the emoji. didn't realise I had done it.
  • heartyfisherheartyfisher Posts: 3,185Member
    :))

    All good ...

    The 85 1.8 afs is surely light. But for the "wobbles" have you considered a Zoom like the tamron 24-70 F2.8 VC. I am really quite happy with mine.

    I have had a stroke about 6 months ago and have not been shooting much myself so I can partly empathize.. Although I am not physically very effected I have "lost" interest in lots of things including photography and going out to shoot. Anyway I hope you find a nice lense suitable for your style.

    BTW what is your preferred subject? That will help us in providing recommendations.
    Moments of Light - D610 D7K S5pro 70-200f4 18-200 150f2.8 12-24 18-70 35-70f2.8 : C&C very welcome!
    Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.

  • sharkeysharkey Posts: 12Member
    :))

    All good ...

    The 85 1.8 afs is surely light. But for the "wobbles" have you considered a Zoom like the tamron 24-70 F2.8 VC. I am really quite happy with mine.

    I have had a stroke about 6 months ago and have not been shooting much myself so I can partly empathize.. Although I am not physically very effected I have "lost" interest in lots of things including photography and going out to shoot. Anyway I hope you find a nice lense suitable for your style.

    BTW what is your preferred subject? That will help us in providing recommendations.
    Preferred subjects?

    Simple anything that strikes my fancy within range (if possible) of my kit.

    Professionally I shot whatever for money - in reaction to that I nowhere very little reason behind my decision to 'click'.

    The zoom option has been considered and I do have an 18-35mm for countryside stuff on my tripod but walking about, moving or quick to take stuff the zoom adds another thing to slow and shake me. If I cannot frame it first time without support I've pretty much blown it.

    See it - camera up - frame it - release. Thats it really. Any considered stuff is on the tri or monopod. I think the comments on the 1.8's accuracy with speed where the deal maker for me. At the moment anyway.

    Regards

    Sharkey
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,491Moderator
    sorry 'bout the emoji. didn't realise I had done it.
    The edit facility is level with your name but on the rhs of your post under the options 'gear'. You can delete the emoticon that way if you like.

    Always learning.
  • sharkeysharkey Posts: 12Member
    sorry 'bout the emoji. didn't realise I had done it.
    The edit facility is level with your name but on the rhs of your post under the options 'gear'. You can delete the emoticon that way if you like.

    "Gotcha" Ta!

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