D90 with 24 -70 2.8 VR

VMSVMS Posts: 2Member
I am trying out the Nikon 24 - 70mm 2.8 VR with my D90. I cannot switch the aperture, it is not changing when I try to change it as I do with the other lenses I have. Tried in both A and M modes. Can someone help me? Is this possible to do on the D90 with this lens? Thank you!

Comments

  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,494Member
    edited April 2016
    I don't think the D90 is fully compatible with "E" lenses, so I don't think you'll get it to work. Check Nikon's website for compatibility.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • PapermanPaperman Posts: 469Member
    edited April 2016
    D90 has to be compatible with every AF Nikon lens....

    Maybe lens not mounted properly. Clean contacts and remount before anything.
    Post edited by Paperman on
  • VMSVMS Posts: 2Member
    Thanks, I just spoke with someone at B & H. First he told me the lens was compatible with the D90, then he did more research and said it was not. So my choices are to go with the older non-VR 24 - 70 2.8 or go with Tamron's version of the lens that has image stabilization. Had not read this in anything before renting. Do any of you know about the Tamron one? I really appreciate all your help!
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,494Member
    Paperman said:

    D90 has to be compatible with every AF Nikon lens....

    Maybe lens not mounted properly. Clean contacts and remount before anything.

    AF is compatible sure, but not the electronic aperture. According to Nikon's global website E lenses are not compatible with... "D-SLR models are D1 series, D2 series, D40 series, D50, D60, D70 series, D80, D90, D100, D200, D3000 and 35mm film cameras."
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • PapermanPaperman Posts: 469Member
    edited April 2016
    @ PB_PM I am not sure why you are mentioning 1970s E lenses which are the old MANUAL metal ringed Nikon lenses. ( There probably was no 24-70mm E series ). VMS has mentioned his lens being a VR which suggests it is a newer lens.

    Am I missing something ?
    Post edited by Paperman on
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,494Member
    edited April 2016
    @Paperman You have no idea what you are talking about do you? The AF-S 24-70mm F2.8E is very much a "E" lens. I'm not talking about E series manual focus, but Nikon lenses with electronic apertures, Nikon came up with it not me. Any lens with an "E" at the end has an electronic aperture... AF-S 800mm F5.6E ED VR, AF-S 300mm F4E PF ED VR, AF-S 24-70mm F2.8E ED VR.

    Quote from the following page... https://support.nikonusa.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/9919/~/glossary-of-nikkor-lens-terms

    Question: What do the letters ED, IF, AIS, AFS, D, E, G, etc. in the names of Nikkor lenses mean?
    There are many different names used to describe the features of a Nikkor lens, some of which can be confusing. The definitions bellow will help describe the abbreviations.

    ED: Extra-Low Dispersion glass
    High-quality glass that corrects for chromatic aberration, a type of image and color distortion that occurs when light rays of varying wavelengths pass through optical glass and don't converge or focus at the same point. Nikkor lenses with ED glass deliver superior sharpness and contrast, even at maximum aperture. Super ED glass is a new type that is used together with ED glass in some lenses to achieve an even higher degree of freedom from chromatic aberration.

    D : Distance
    D-type AF-Nikkor lenses relay subject-to-camera distance information to Nikon SLR cameras that feature 3D Color Matrix Metering, 3D Matrix Metering, and 3D Multi-Sensor Balanced Fill-Flash.

    E: An electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism in the lens barrel provides highly accurate electronic diaphragm or aperture blade control when using auto exposure during continuous shooting. With conventional D/G type lenses, the diaphragm blades are operated by mechanical linkage levers.

    G: The lens has no aperture control ring and is designed to be used with cameras that allow setting the aperture from the camera body. G lenses also provide Distance information to the camera.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 2,443Member
    Try the 24-85 VR ( not the old one) its real sharp and cheap
  • NikoniserNikoniser Posts: 100Member
    Get the older 24-70 AFS NON VR and with the money you save get a Nikon d7100/7200 to upgrade your D90.

    It is actually the better lens on DX format as its sharper in the center area that DX camera use.

  • heartyfisherheartyfisher Posts: 3,186Member
    All these lenses are sharper than your D90 can resolve.. so they will have no difference in terms of resolution. So since sharpness cancels out, that leaves the other parameters. My question is why are you "trying it out" ?. Are you trying the lense so that you can see how it feels, so that you can purchase it later? or have you a specific event/subject/trip that you are needing a 24-70 F2.8 "pro" lense for?
    Moments of Light - D610 D7K S5pro 70-200f4 18-200 150f2.8 12-24 18-70 35-70f2.8 : C&C very welcome!
    Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.

  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,287Member
    edited April 2016
    Maybe you're trying to buy lenses to future proof yourself, but the 24-70 is an odd choice if you're starting off with a DX camera. Fast short zooms are hard to come by for DX though, so I might see where you're going there.

    Like others have said, this lens is too new for your camera and the aperture control won't work.
    Post edited by NSXTypeR on
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    edited April 2016
    NSXTypeR said:

    Like others have said, this lens is too new for your camera and the aperture control won't work.

    I would say it the other way 'round. @VMS Your camera is too old for this lens to work. Nikon introduced the new E type (following G type) starting with the PC-E lenses (I think, someone correct me if I'm wrong) in 2008, the same year your camera was made. Essentially all Nikon DSLRs introduced on and after 23rd August 2007 (the day Nikon introduced the D3 and D300), with two exceptions the D90 and D3000, are fully compatible with E lenses.

    The E type lenses have no mechanical aperture arm linkage, and rely on electronic communication from the camera body to set the opening. Due to this they are much quicker to close down, and much more consistant/accurate especially at high frame rates.

    Note we are NOT talking about the low cost Nikon "Series E" lenses made in the late '70s and early '80s. These are entirely different and are 100% mechanical lenses post Ai-S and should be fully compatible with the D90 and every other camera.

    Post edited by Ironheart on
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,398Moderator
    It would seem a better investment to your kit would be to upgrade the camera body...maybe a D7200 with the 18-140 lens... Results will be far more satisfying than a fancy lens on the D90. And, the cost for this combo is less than the 24-70/2.8
    Msmoto, mod
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,494Member
    Ironheart said:


    I would say it the other way 'round. @VMS Your camera is too old for this lens to work. Nikon introduced the new E type (following G type) starting with the PC-E lenses (I think, someone correct me if I'm wrong) in 2008, the same year your camera was made.

    Not the same thing, exactly. They do have electronic apertures, but the PC-E lenses are classified as D lenses. They have a "G" type mount without a physical aperture ring, but the CPU pins are the same as a AF-D lens, which I think is why they are designated as such. The issue with the PC-E lenses is that there isn't enough room to physically mount them on many bodies.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • proudgeekproudgeek Posts: 1,422Member
    For a few years, I shot an older 24-70 with a D90 (as well as a 17-35). When I upgraded to a D800, it was a revelation. "So THAT'S how that lens is supposed to act." Normally I'm a proponent of investing in glass over body, but in this case I might make an exception.
Sign In or Register to comment.