Is Nikon Sexist?

AndyJKAndyJK Posts: 8Member
edited September 2017 in General Discussions
Or were they really unable to find a single female photographer to promote the D850? Before anyone goes off with half-cocked accusations and insults (true, a rarity on this site, but I made the title provocative with purpose), you should read this article: https://nytimes.com/2017/09/14/technology/nikon-female-photographers.html Update: I posted the link, but it will take 2 clicks to get to the article for those who care to read it.
Would like to hear your thoughts on this. I've only been on this site for a short time, but have noticed that the people here have and express their opinions!
Post edited by AndyJK on

Comments

  • autofocusautofocus Posts: 625Member
    Don't care. I'm sick of this crap. I guess that makes me sexist because I just don't care about all the whining about everything anymore. I want to take photos. Let each blaze his or her own path to happiness. I don't think whining about everything is the way ahead. Now, back to camera and photography discussion.
  • Vipmediastar_JZVipmediastar_JZ Posts: 1,708Member
    Next camera release people will complain because there was no monkey photographer. Seems everybody gets offended over nothing.
    It was so funny reading comments by women saying they are dropping nikon for this. Yeah ok, loose the investment and start new with canon or sony. :/

    It is a non issue that people on social media just want to fuel for no reason.
  • dissentdissent Posts: 1,268Member
    "Hey, don't look at me, just look at my work - I'm a talented photographer."
    or
    "Hey, nobody looks like me in your advertising. _____ist!!"

    So, which is it. I'm confused. /s
    - Ian . . . [D7000, D7100; Nikon glass: 35 f1.8, 85 f1.8, 70-300 VR, 105 f2.8 VR, 12-24 f4; 16-85 VR, 300 f4D, 14E-II TC, SB-400, SB-700 . . . and still plenty of ignorance]
  • Vipmediastar_JZVipmediastar_JZ Posts: 1,708Member
    For the D810 Miss Amelia was one of the main photographers. For the BnH reveal they had snapchick. According to nikon they reached out to females but they were unavailbe to attend.

    https://anya-likhitha.com/blog/iamwoman

    I been with Nikon since 2007 and I Am offended im not a NPS member :'( there is a heavy argument going on another blog. Racism/Sexism. Everybody is getting worked over this
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 1,833Member
    dont forget the gays ,lesbians and TVs........................
  • FreezeActionFreezeAction Posts: 819Member
    I'm biting my lip....
  • Capt_SpauldingCapt_Spaulding Posts: 497Member
    I've been biting mine as well. If you're reading this, it's because my better judgement lost and I hit "Post Comment" instead of Delete.

    Is Nikon sexist? I suspect not, at least not in the sense we usually think of sexism. I suspect Nikon is convinced they tried to find a female (or more) photographer to put on their list. I'm not in position to question that.

    The problems are, however, deeper than that. Women and non-whites have been on the lower links of the status food chain for a very long time. It is only in the last 50 years that that trend has really begun to change and the evolution is far from complete. Nikon claim to have tried to find a female to enlist. I suspect they did.

    What I don't know is how hard they tried. I don't know the dynamics of sex among photographers in the regions to which they reached out. However, I am pretty sure that, in those regions there are pretty resilient (and large) pockets of the tradition form(s) of sexism. If that's true it might take more effort to enlist women there than say in Europe or North America.

    I can easily imagine that Nikon did put out some effort to find females, but as the results indicate they didn't put out enough effort as evidenced by the absence of women in their pool. The next question would be should they have put more effort into it. That's a normative question, but I think they should. Not only for PR purposes, but because I would like to see women emerge from the shadows in those regions and begin to teach the rest of us the lessons we have yet to learn. They can do that in many ways, from behind the lens is a good place to start.

    I freely admit this is all just my simple thinking on the subject. It's is far more complex than I have given it credit for. This is however, more than an "opinion." There is a pretty large empirical literature on the subject of unconscious/implicit bias. As uncomfortable as it is, the data suggest many to most of us suffer from it. I confess, I see it in my reactions to events all too frequently. I really wish Nikon had found some women to include. It would have preempted the critics and, selfishly, I would love to see Africa and the Middle East (and Asia) through a woman's eyes.
  • sportsport Posts: 106Member
    I can't tell you who any of the 32 photographers were that were picked. Who cares which dancing chicken is trying to promote the camera? Reading the article and Twitter feeds they make it sound like Nikon only uses men to promote all their products. A quick check on the NikonUSA site shows seven women ambassadors. This pc crap is really getting annoying. Frankly, I only care about what the camera can do and when it will be available.
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,045Member
  • HikerHiker Posts: 197Member
    Nikons excuse is lame. And remember the Japanese culture, unless that's changed all of a sudden. But Nikon should have tried just a little harder to find ONE woman to try out the new 850.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,072Moderator
    I'm with you @sport.
    Always learning.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,005Member
    edited September 2017
    Honestly who trusts Nikon/Canon/Sony etc brand "ambassadors" anyway? They all say the same thing each time "this new ____ is is the best thing ever, it's perfect, so much better than the last one I said was perfect a few weeks back." So whether the person is a women or man makes no difference to me.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • vtc2002vtc2002 Posts: 364Member
    As a father of a teenage daughter that is a budding photographer and artist, if she chooses to become a professional photographer or artists I want her (and she feels the same way) to be measured on her work and not because of her sex or any other factor. Her sex does not matter at all. I don't understand this movement in our society to force every one to believe in another groups cause or agenda and that you are a bad person if you don't. At the end of the day you if you can't lay your head on your pillow and be proud of what you accomplished that day and fall asleep then the next day you should do something different.

  • autofocusautofocus Posts: 625Member
    How many female photographers are members of other photog sites? Why aren't they complaining about all the posts/photos of scantly clad women by either male or female photogs. Isn't that sexist???? I'm sick of this movement to abolish everything and move into a gray society. Sure, there are things that can and should improve but jumping on a bandwagon to promote yourself (all the men defending/championing the cause) so you'll be seen as one of those gray people and accepted by a segment of society is hilarious. If we were to check some portfolios I'm sure we would find something to shout SEXISM. I have 3 daughters and they are forging their own way in life. None of them complain to me about how mistreated they are. They tackle each challenge as it comes and move on. If we continue down this path where does it end. What's next. For those bashing Nikon what will change your mind. It's obvious an apology won't work so what exactly do you want????? Spell it out instead of making foolish statements about how it isn't enough. Or better yet, punish with your wallet. I know, wallet is a sexist statement. What isn't these days.
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,084Member
    edited September 2017

    What I don't know is how hard they tried. I don't know the dynamics of sex among photographers in the regions to which they reached out. However, I am pretty sure that, in those regions there are pretty resilient (and large) pockets of the tradition form(s) of sexism. If that's true it might take more effort to enlist women there than say in Europe or North America.

    I can easily imagine that Nikon did put out some effort to find females, but as the results indicate they didn't put out enough effort as evidenced by the absence of women in their pool. The next question would be should they have put more effort into it. That's a normative question, but I think they should. Not only for PR purposes, but because I would like to see women emerge from the shadows in those regions and begin to teach the rest of us the lessons we have yet to learn. They can do that in many ways, from behind the lens is a good place to start.

    I agree with this statement. Perhaps Nikon really did look long and hard for competent photographers and only this batch of 32 photographs made the cut and they all happened to be men. I can't testify either on how hard they looked, but if you loosened their standards of judgement I'm going to have a problem marketing my camera.

    I've seen great photos from men, women, young and old.
    PB_PM said:

    Honestly who trusts Nikon/Canon/Sony etc brand "ambassadors" anyway? They all say the same thing each time "this new ____ is is the best thing ever, it's perfect, so much better than the last one I said was perfect a few weeks back." So whether the person is a women or man makes no difference to me.

    Agreed completely! Scott Kelby, Matt Kloskowski, even Moose Peterson, Chase Jarvis and Joe McNally all are competent photographers, but all of them shoot Nikon (at one point or another) for their bottom line (I know Scott Kelby shoots Canon now). Scott and Matt both just use cameras to sell their photoshop books, it doesn't matter what brand you use. Even Moose uses it to sell bags and stuff. Scott even made a big deal about switching away from Canon to drum up controversy and probably video views. Chase Jarvis was big a while back, but I haven't heard anything from him anymore.

    I agree with this statement too. If I wanted to promote my new camera, I'd damn make sure I'd get 32 competent photographers turning out good material. Race and gender would be the least of my worries, my priority is to make my camera look good.

    If your work stands out, it'll be noticed. In a perfect world your background shouldn't matter. As much as I care for equality in this world, I understand that there are marginalized groups out there. However, not everything is an attack on marginalized groups and the general quality of work should not be degraded in an effort to lift a few up. That's like saying it's ok to have a surgical nurse practitioner run a neurosurgery case because they happened to have worked 30 years and has the technical experience.
    Post edited by NSXTypeR on
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • ElephRhinoElephRhino Posts: 10Member
    If they had found one or two or ten, it wouldn't have been enough. Had they found 16, the argument, as others have stated, would have shifted to minorities (whether based on race, religion, or whatever). If you like your camera, you can keep your camera. If you like the manufacturer, you can keep the manufacturer. ;-)
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,072Moderator
    If Nikon had carefully selected a 'perfect' cross-section of today's society in terms of religion, race, sexual gender and political persuasion, we would all be moaning about them being too politically correct. Who cares?
    Always learning.
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 843Member
    I find it a little bit strange that most people that care about this article seems to be men that needs to say that they don't care about the article. To me the article makes a point and it is someones view and opinion, but nothing more and nothing less. I suggest we leave the article at that.
Sign In or Register to comment.