DSLR/Camera Suggestions for Video

swamespswamesp Posts: 17Member
Been a Nikon user for the past 12+ years and really like their system and have no experience with other brands except with Sony from a friend of mine, with its terrible battery life and other heating issues.

Was really hoping that Nikon ML FF will be out by Jun or July this year. Looks like I was dreaming. Anyways I was wondering what are the other cameras available for recording 1080p 120fps or 4k 30 or 60fps with a good low light performance? Is panasonic any better than sony? Would be nice to have a stop-gap thing until Nikon comes up with their solution. Will be using it with a gimbal for smooth shots.

What are the videographers here in this community use?

Am I restricting myself by not looking beyond Nikon?

Thanks
Swami

Comments

  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,679Member
    edited May 1
    Sony and Panasonic are your best bets for 4k video, but the Sony will have better low light performance by virtue of having the larger sensors. I would skip Nikon if video is your focus, unless you have a lot of high end lenses. Canon, Panasonic and Sony are way ahead in terms of just about everything important for dedicated video shooting.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 1,409Member
    you want to think very carefully about what you are going to use it for .In every situation a shoulder mounted camera is better,more steady and can be held longer.
    If all your use is on a tripod OK but if you need to move about then forget the DSLR.
  • swamespswamesp Posts: 17Member
    Thanks both for the reply.

    Most of the videos are on the move, I would be using a gimbal, either Zhiyun Crane 2 or the DJI Ronin-S (to be released soon) so lens+body combo should not be too heavy. If I could use nikon lenses that would be great!

    Otherwise will invest on Manual Focus lenses on whichever brand that I have to go with.

    How about Panasonic GH5? The earlier versions of Sony were terrible with overheating issues, may be newer ones are better, I'm not really excited about going towards sony.

    Using an adapter and GH5, later if Nikon Mirrorless is good at video, I could get rid off the Panasonic Body. Is this a sane option?
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 1,409Member
    Hanging the camera on your arm is not a good idea except for short sequences ..think carefully.
  • bigeaterbigeater Posts: 33Member
    What are you going to use the video for? That will determine what camera you need. But if you've never shot video before, I would recommend you buy a video camera with the features you want while you're learning. DSLRs have terrible autofocus and are generally a pain to work with.
    That said, Nikon cameras and lenses can produce the most gorgeous footage imaginable so I would stick with Nikon if you absolutely must have DSLR video.
    Low light is an area where there's lots of misinformation. Video people bring lights with them, so low light performance isn't really an issue. Whatever you plan to spend, budget at least a few hundred dollars for some battery-operated LED panels.
    At the risk of repeating myself, nothing nothing matters more in video than lighting. Learn to use back light and rim light, they are what will make your video look good.
  • swamespswamesp Posts: 17Member

    Hanging the camera on your arm is not a good idea except for short sequences ..think carefully.

    Agreed, heavy body/lens combo might not be an option.
  • swamespswamesp Posts: 17Member
    bigeater said:

    What are you going to use the video for? That will determine what camera you need. But if you've never shot video before, I would recommend you buy a video camera with the features you want while you're learning....
    At the risk of repeating myself, nothing nothing matters more in video than lighting. Learn to use back light and rim light, they are what will make your video look good.

    I have shot videos before with D7000, D750, D4s with 24-70 or 70-200 mostly with monopod. This time it will be mostly run and gun types. Event videography for a non-profit. I'm nowhere near any professionals in videography. Ready to learn, would be better to have something that's light. Sony terrible battery life and screen, ridiculously expensive glasses, is pushing me towards GH5.

    I do have a RODE mic, will buy a portable light to go with GH5. I've started to look at eBay for a used GH5.
  • bigeaterbigeater Posts: 33Member
    Great. While you're there, buy yourself an eye light for the top of the camera. I use the Aputure AL-M9 but any similar small dayligt-balanced LED will do. Properly used it gives your videos a more professional look because it makes faces look just a little brighter and better than the surrounding scene adds a catchlight. It also chases wrinkles from older subjects.
    You mount it on the top of your camera or cage. But there's a trick, you have to angle the beam about 30 degrees away from the subject and turn down the brightness until you can barely see the effect when you wave your hand in front of the light. . If you need tungsten light, I think it might come with a filter.
    Anyway, that's the only other wisdom I know.
    Happy shooting.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 1,409Member
    Quotes

    , I would recommend you buy a video camera with the features you want while you're learning....

    Hanging the camera on your arm is not a good idea except for short sequences ..think carefully.

    .In every situation a shoulder mounted camera is better,more steady and can be held longer.

    There are non so blind as those who cannot see.
  • swamespswamesp Posts: 17Member
    bigeater said:

    Great. While you're there, buy yourself an eye light for the top of the camera. I use the Aputure AL-M9 but any similar small dayligt-balanced LED will do.....Anyway, that's the only other wisdom I know.
    Happy shooting.

    Thanks for the nice wisdom. Will add it to the list!
  • swamespswamesp Posts: 17Member

    Quotes

    , I would recommend you buy a video camera with the features you want while you're learning....

    Hanging the camera on your arm is not a good idea except for short sequences ..think carefully.

    .In every situation a shoulder mounted camera is better,more steady and can be held longer.

    There are non so blind as those who cannot see.

    Do you recommend any specific camera? I won't be recording the entire event with camera on my hand. This is more of action shots, say example, folks walking in, discussing during the break...etc. kinda thing.
  • sportsport Posts: 46Member
    If video is a priority then I would recommend looking at Panasonic and Fuji cameras. Try renting one of them and see what you think.

    Honestly, Nikon doesn't prioritize video on their cameras and it shows. It always seems to be an afterthought.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 1,409Member
    edited May 13
    If you use a DSLR you will also need an audio mixer ,radio mike ,camera mike .
    Usually with a real video camera the audio mixer is built in and you can adjust as you shoot.
    A real camera gives you status at events ..moves people and gets respect.
    With a large Sony on my shoulder I once walked into an event and was 6 ft from Prince Charles.
    Post edited by spraynpray on
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