Expert photography.com Plagiarism and Fraud

Comments

  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,114Member
    edited November 2019
    Never really looked at that site, so I'm not familiar with diagrams and such and the particulars of what that site stole. All sources through the internet should be taken with a grain of salt.

    I think one of the most important classes I took in college was a news literacy course that still serves me well today in which you need to look at each source critically and how to see red flags about sources. It's surprisingly relevant today with today's news and current events and thoughts about information manipulation.
    Post edited by NSXTypeR on
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • mhedgesmhedges Posts: 1,402Member
    I believe the main NR blog gets things stolen/copied from it fairly frequently as well.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,068Member
    If you have put something of value on the internet, there is a good bet someone else has copied it and likely made a profit from doing so.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • Ton14Ton14 Posts: 552Member
    The rule has been this simple for 20 years, everything you put on the internet is no longer yours. Good luck with lawsuits, if you can afford that. My own rule is, do not put anything on the internet and certainly never in a cloud.
    User Ton changed to Ton14, Google sign in did not work anymore
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,127Member
    Ton14, unfortunately it is difficult or even impossible to operate a serious business without being in the cloud. Yardi and MRI, the only real options for a serious Real Estate Management ERP, are both in the cloud for example.
  • Ton14Ton14 Posts: 552Member
    edited November 2019
    @WestEndFoto Yes you are right, but there is more money available for more security.

    For me and just for personal use, my own server is my cloud (for 8 years at the moment). I lost all my cloud data once, due to the (very big) provider I had, was shut down. Of course I had back-ups. A friend of mine also lost his cloud data, due to problems with his provider (the biggest here in Holland).

    Further my photo's are used twice without my permission, I send them an invoice when I found out, got paid after one legal pressure letter, but that was once, I was much to small for that, don't want that anymore. Now it's just fun what I put on Flickr and that is all.
    Post edited by Ton14 on
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  • kanuckkanuck Posts: 1,300Member
    edited December 2019
    Geez another reason to bring back film :((
    Post edited by kanuck on
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,068Member
    Not sure what good that would do, people stole other peoples photos from film too.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,114Member
    edited December 2019
    kanuck said:

    Geez another reason to bring back film :((

    PB_PM said:

    Not sure what good that would do, people stole other peoples photos from film too.

    I took a journalism class and we had mentioned integrity of photojournalists and the ethics of photography. I can't remember which war, but I remember war journalists often pass through scenes of carnage and destruction and corpses. While journalists should take photos and video of the surroundings, any manipulation of the scene is not allowed on ethical grounds.

    Like I said, no recent examples come to mind, but Brian Willams had recently lied about what he experienced sustained during his coverage of the Iraq war. He wasn't a photojournalist, but is a news anchor and is held up to a certain standard of integrity. If a photojournalist lied about a photo, you'd be similarly punished.


    Post edited by NSXTypeR on
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
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