hot shoe bubble level

I would like a bubble level that mounts on the hot shoe of my Nikon D850. Adorama has four different brands that are apparently universal mount. However I believe the newer digital cameras (Canon, Nikon, Sony, etc) use slightly different size hot shoes. Does anyone know if all of these aftermarket bubble levels will fit a Nikon hot shoe?
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  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,200Moderator
    I had a bubble level back in the day before they built them into the camera. I use the level function all the time so I programmed it ont a quick access button. You can have it visible in the viewfinder for hnd held or the back screen which I use for tripod use.

    Why do you want a bubble?
    Always learning.
  • MrFotoFoolMrFotoFool Posts: 99Member
    @spraynpray I guess I never thought about that feature being available in camera. I want it to do stitched images with the camera turned sideways (vertical). Does the in camera level work if the camera is in vertical orientation?
  • MrFotoFoolMrFotoFool Posts: 99Member
    I still think I need a bubble level for this purpose because it has two bubbles. One to make sure the camera is not leaning left or right. This is what I believe the in camera function can do as well. But the other bubble makes sure the camera is not leaning forward or backwards, which I think the in camera function cannot tell me?
  • MrFotoFoolMrFotoFool Posts: 99Member
    PROBLEM SOLVED. I was planning on looking up an L Bracket for my Manfrotto head to use in conjunction with this. I just looked it up and the L Bracket has a vertical bubble level built in. https://www.adorama.com/bglb050m4q2.html
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,200Moderator
    edited March 1
    I have always found the best level to be in camera. Tripod levels are notoriously inaccurate. If you take five minutes to investigate the in camera functions I mentioned above you will see that the camera can be set level in any plane, and with the screen level you can even set it horizontal front to back giving three axis of possibility. Try it, you will see that bubbles are SO last millenium! ;)
    Post edited by spraynpray on
    Always learning.
  • retreadretread Posts: 554Member
    I have never used the level built into the camera but spraynpray is correct.
  • MrFotoFoolMrFotoFool Posts: 99Member
    Some of us like the last millenium! :p You are talking to someone who barely uses a cell phone (and only then for occasional phone calls or texts) and doesn't even own a television. I also do not understand how any mechanical bubble level can be inaccurate - I mean the bubble always floats at the top. I may look into your digital option, but honestly I don't like using additional features on a camera and prefer to keep it as simple as possible. If the tripod and L Bracket already have physical bubbles I honestly think it would be easier FOR ME to use those than to use an in-camera feature. However when I have the time and inclination I will look into your option to see if I can be swayed.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,200Moderator
    Most bubbles are inaccurate! There are so many ways they can be made wrong you would be surprised. Only if the 'top' you speak of actually is the the 'top' will they work which is rare.

    I don't mean to be rude, but modern cameras are capable of great adaptability and complexity - I can't think of many easier things to do that use the level functions. Tell me, how do you get it level when the camera is to your eye? You can't see any bubble that is in the hot shoe then?
    Always learning.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,097Member
    edited March 3
    I find the built in level to be okay, but often leaves the camera off to one side or the other. If it was just one camera I wouldn't say anything, but every Nikon camera I've had with the feature has been off (at least 4 now).
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • GPDenGPDen Posts: 922Member
    I'm with spray on this one using a function button to activate the in camera levelling whenever I need it (i.e. the odd landscape shot or building) and it works fine for me. If slightly off when post editing just adjust it then. On the hotshoe size I've always believed it was the same across all camera makers, like an ISO standard. Only shoot Nikon so can't check. On the odd occasion I use a tripod I do initially use the bubble level built into the ball head and again adjust in post if not accurate.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,200Moderator
    PB_PM said:

    I find the built in level to be okay, but often leaves the camera off to one side or the other. If it was just one camera I wouldn't say anything, but every Nikon camera I've had with the feature has been off (at least 4 now).

    Wow, how experiences vary! I have only had 6 Nikons of which 4 have had levels and every one of them has been spot-on for level. I shoot lots of pano's and I never have to touch them to correct level error.

    I bought a bubble level to use on my earlier cameras with two axis levelling built in - that wasn't good and none of my tripods have been right either and all of those methods are really slow and clunky to use.

    I have a ball head on which the top plate rotates independently of the rotation of the whole head so I can throw my tripod down without worrying about level at all then set the level on the screen at the rear and shoot.

    Regarding the size of the hot shoes, these days most people (except Sony of course) use the same size but they pretty much all use their own electrical contact layout which does not affect the use of a bubble level as there are no contacts on the plate.
    Always learning.
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