Looking for experiences from Canon EF to Nikon Z switchers

picpic Posts: 2Member
I'm NOT looking for which is better, actively tryoing not going down that rabbit hole.
I'm looking for experiences from people who switched from Canon EF gear to Nikon Z gear.

What did you move from/to ?
What did you have to adapt to ?
What surprised you ?
What would you do different had you to do it again with what you know now ?

If it helps you: I'm heavily invested in Canon EF gear (2* 5DmkIV, 1* 7DmkII, tons of lenses). I use the in-body GPS features of these bodies a lot and learned over the years looking back at pictures I took years ago that what I miss most often is MPs, anything else is relatively easy to fix in Lightroom and the like, but if you don't have the resolution, you simply won't have it. That's why I'm currently not finding what I need over at Canon in the release nor rumored RF bodies, and decided to have a broader look at other brands.

But again: please no "brand war", just honest real-life experience.

Comments

  • photobunnyphotobunny Posts: 519Member
    What did you move from/to ?
    I moved from the 1DX, 5D2, and 7D to the Nikon Z6. With a 300mm f/2.8, 70-200 f/4 L and f/2.8 L II, 24-70 f/2.8, and frequently renting the 200-400 and 600mm.

    What did you have to adapt to ?
    Didn't adapt any of my lenses, mainly because the 300mm f/2.8 wasn't able to adapt over due to its older AF by wire. And I wanted the best out the system so I went for a F 500mm f/5.6 PF, Z 70-200 f/2.8 + a 1.4x TC, Z 50mm f/1.8 and Z 20mm f/1.8.

    What surprised you ?
    The amount of eyeballs in focus greatly improved. The ergonomics feel better than Canon even with the body being much smaller. Basically I was surprised it felt so familiar.

    What would you do different had you to do it again with what you know now ?
    I would have perhaps waited for the Z7II or Z9, but then I wouldn't have all this glass now to shove on the Z9 when it does get through my post box. I may have considered the Canon R5 instead, but I was looking for a change of pace.

    If you switch over I do suggest Capture One with the pro Nikon colour profiles as they just improve the images and I have found setting my WB to shade in most conditions results in the best image. Though the second outdoor AWB mode also gives good results. After my previous gear having ISO 14,400 look better than ISO 800 in most shots is quite the impressive upgrade.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 2,343Member
    Quote " if you don't have the resolution, you simply won't have it. "
    Truer words have never been spoken on any forum.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 2,343Member
    This would get more responses on Backcountry Gallery.
  • photobunnyphotobunny Posts: 519Member

    This would get more responses on Backcountry Gallery.

    https://www.canonrumors.com also has a good mix of people using both Canon and Nikon cameras. And they are a rather welcoming lot.
  • MrFotoFoolMrFotoFool Posts: 276Member
    I switched from Canon EF to Nikon F (NOT Nikon Z). You can read about my experience in this thread: https://forum.nikonrumors.com/discussion/5743/my-experience-from-canon-5d4-to-nikon-d850
    One feature I had not used at the time but now use often is focus stacking. Canon EF does not have it (and my D850 does), but if you go mirrorless it's a moot point because I believe both Canon R and Nikon Z have it.
  • manraymanray Posts: 3Member
    It's a good question, wherever you post it. I switched from a lot of Canon gear to Nikon simply because I was a fool for the most part, and convinced myself Nikon had more to offer. A fool because I let DxO scores influence me so heavily; I later discovered DxO is not a good source for evaluating real-world image quality. When I made the switch I had been using a 6D and a 5D, with a fair amount of recent L glass. Because DxO scored Nikon lenses on higher res cameras like the D800E so much higher, I was convinced the images would be better. The fact that one can use older Nikkor lenses on the newer bodies was also appealing. So I sold my Canon gear and bought first a D800E and then a D810; I have since moved up to the Z bodies through the D500 and the D850. And I have come to realize that the only somewhat reliable way to evaluate lenses is with MTF charts.

    Now, since making the move to Nikon I have to say I have no real regrets at all, but I realize that for the past six years since I made the switch, my images probably would have been just as good on my 6D and L lenses. I really loved the 6D and felt it was as good as the then contemporary 5D version; I know friends who have the 5D IV and I know that it is a superior camera and I would have moved up to it had I continued with Canon.

    I am now heavily invested in Nikon, with a Z6 II, a Z7 and am waiting for the new Z9. And like I said, I have no real regrets. If I had to do it again, I'd probably do it again, mainly because I have come to love the Z bodies and I wouldn't have known then how good the new Canon bodies were likely to be, and I understand they are also quite good. The Nikon Z bodies are simply amazing. The Menus are a little confusing at times (I still prefer the menus of Canon's 6D era), but I can use all sorts of glass, like the old AI-S 43-86mm lens I still have leftover from shooting Nikon 35mm in the 1980s. Also, the higher resolution, wider dynamic range, the lack of a low-pass filter, OSPDF, and IBIS of the Z7 has really been important in my landscape photography. Other features like focus-shift shooting also plays an important role in that respect.

    For action and wildlife I bought a D500, a phenomenal APS-C camera that I thought I would never buy. I recently sold it to buy the Z9 that should be an adequate replacement for it.

    But a word about the Z6 II is also warranted: even though it has fewer megapixels, and a low-pass filter, it is by far one of the most capable full-frame cameras on the market, good at just about everything.

    Glass is, of course, perhaps the most important gear you can get. I know Canon glass is certainly superb; Nikon is probably as good or better, but maybe more expensive, so that is a major consideration when making the switch. And another important note about lenses is, using older Nikon lenses with the FTZ adapter on the Z bodies—in every instance it's an improvement over using the F glass on Nikon DSLRs, and the results with better glass is about as good as it gets. It has taken me five years to build up my lens collection to the best lenses I can afford, but I still use 3 older AF-S lenses. And as I said, I have no regrets.

    In conclusion, I would suggest you rent some Nikon gear, a Z7 (or Z7 II, IQ is the same on either) and one or two of the new Z lenses—the Z 50mm or 85mm prime, or the Z 24-70mm f/2.8, depending on what you like to shoot, and see what you think. Maybe even rent an F mount lens with the FTZ adapter as well. Look to PhotographyLife or Steve Perry for setup advice. It's all a very tough decision, a big decision so take your time.
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