Sigma 24 1.4 Art

kenadamskenadams Posts: 222Member
edited February 2015 in Other Manufacturers
Newly announced on the main blog, minus price info so far.

I've been thinking hard about getting the new 20mm 1.8 Nikon as a wide angle prime, as the Nikon 24 1.4 is not to justify for me, price wise.

My N17- 35 2.8 is a heavy beast. Ok, the new Sigma may not be that much lighter ... anyway, looking forward to hearing info on the price.
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Comments

  • sevencrossingsevencrossing Posts: 2,800Member
    I am in the same boat
    but I do worry about future compatibility with sigma products
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    Well, so far I had no unsolvable compatibility issues with 4 new Sigmas. There were updates of the firmware as soon as people reported about compatibility issues.

    My point would be, if I were in your shoes @kenadams: The 20/1.8 is available NOW. Nobody, even not Sigma's CEO knows when the 24 Art for Nikon will hit the shelves. I was waiting since start of October for the 150-600 Sports and a week ago I was told "not before march". I'm a big fan of Sigma's outstanding quality at hard-to-beat-prices but if it comes to delivery date promises, they just suck.
  • ThomasHortonThomasHorton Posts: 323Member
    I never really considered getting a 24mm lens before. But if the quality is as good as my 35mm, I might consider adding this to my kit. I am starting to appreciate the wider angle FLs.
    Gear: Camera obscura with an optical device which transmits and refracts light.
  • kenadamskenadams Posts: 222Member
    @funtagraph, I was considering the 20mm mostly because of a lack of uncostly yet decent options. Sigma's 1.8 line seems to pretty much suck, the 24 included; the Samyang is big and MF; and the Nikon 24 is simply over the top expensive. Sigma just announced this earlier than Nikon's own rumored 24/1.8.
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 845Member
    edited February 2015
    I own only Nikon cameras and Sigma lenses, and have never had compatibility issues. You never know about the future, but it is a good thing that you can change the mount of new Sigma lenses, as a last worst case possibility.

    I think I would wait for the Sigma, but it depends on how much you need a wide angle prime. Maybe wait for the reviews and then decide?
    Post edited by snakebunk on
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    @funtagraph, I was considering the 20mm mostly because of a lack of uncostly yet decent options. Sigma's 1.8 line seems to pretty much suck, the 24 included; the Samyang is big and MF; and the Nikon 24 is simply over the top expensive. Sigma just announced this earlier than Nikon's own rumored 24/1.8.
    I'm sure the Sigma will be slightly more costly than the Nikon 20/1.8 yet much better optically. I've seen the amount of ED-glass and aspheric elements and I wonder how long I can resist the temptation - my 24/1.4G delivered some pretty nice pictures, I love the FL and the open aperture.

  • PhotobugPhotobug Posts: 4,603Member
    I agree with Peter's post in the comment section of the main blog - $1,000 to $1,200.
    D750 & D7100 | 24-70 F2.8 G AF-S ED, 70-200 F2.8 AF VR, TC-14E III, TC-1.7EII, 35 F2 AF D, 50mm F1.8G, 105mm G AF-S VR | Backup & Wife's Gear: D5500 & Sony HX50V | 18-140 AF-S ED VR DX, 55-300 AF-S G VR DX |
    |SB-800, Amaran Halo LED Ring light | MB-D16 grip| Gitzo GT3541 + RRS BH-55LR, Gitzo GM2942 + Sirui L-10 | RRS gear | Lowepro, ThinkTank, & Hoodman gear | BosStrap | Vello Freewave Plus wireless Remote, Leica Lens Cleaning Cloth |
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    Shall we bet? I think, once it reaches the shelves (maybe even before 2016, who knows?) it will be just a bit lower than $ 1,000 as the Yen is also weak. A bit more than the 50 Art.

    Nikon needs to push their sales. If Sigma could deliver today, a lot of people would run for that new Art lens.
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 732Member
    I have the Nikon 24mm PC-E lens, and though it is a very different lens, I am happy with it as a manual 24mm in its own right. It is shift-tilt lens as well, but a very capable 24mm lens nonetheless.

    The Sigma 50mm ART is a sweet lens, and I am sure the 24mm will be as well, just not one I need...
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,006Member
    If the price is around $1k than I'm going to get one of these bad boys. :) That is if Nikon doesn't release a 24mm F1.8G N in the mean time, at a reasonable price (aka less than $899).
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    edited February 2015
    "In the mean time", that is, within the next two years? I'm exaggerating a bit but in reality I don't expect it much before christmas - and I don't even guess the year. So, tons of time to think about exchanging my "old" 24/1.4G against that sweety.
    Post edited by funtagraph on
  • kenadamskenadams Posts: 222Member
    Why would you want to get rid of the N24/1.4? I always assumed it was an awesome lens?
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    @kenadams I really don't have a better reason than curiosity. It IS an awesome lens and I made the unpleasant experience, it's build like a tank. The only thing after falling down a couple of stairs and ending on concrete was a scratch in the filter thread. It was shooting afterwards as if that was daily warm-up =D>

    The Sigma looks a bit better performancewise but I'm afraid I'd gain nothing spectacular. However, I'm a curious person sometimes. Anyway, it's lightyears away :)
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    Just read about the price. 849 US$ =D>

    Oh, dear, tough times to come for Nikon… how do they do that?
  • autofocusautofocus Posts: 625Member
    I own the 35 and 50 Art. This one is looking pretty good as well. I'm not hurting for the 24mm focal length but this might be a choice for the video arsenal. Really liking what Sigma is doing. I wish they would come out with a 135mm Art. That I would definitely be in line for.
  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    edited February 2015
    For those that are thinking about this new lens. the only thing I would caution you on is focusing in dark conditions. Having just got back from my overseas trip, I explored many venues that were dark (caves, churches, old indoor buildings, etc...etc). Both of my Sigma lenses (35 & 50 Art) hunted quite a lot, to the point I found them unusable. I'm talking about setting that require ISO's in the 5000 and up. Now on the other hand my Nikon 14-24 & specially the 24 1.4g performance outstandingly. AF was spot on! I can assure you, when you cannot take a tripod or are being constantly pushed to keep up on a tour or areas were you have time restrictions, you need a AF on a lens that works. It is here that the Sigma lacks performance.
    Post edited by Golf007sd on
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,085Moderator
    That there is great honest advice. Solid gold.
    Always learning.
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    edited February 2015
    This is totally not my experience. Up to ISO 12.800 or more, no probs. Of course, not all focus points remain usable, but hunting is no issue with those lenses. And to be fair: themore wide-angle you go, the more light is collected and probability increases that in the wide AF frames is something the camera can focus on. On the contrary, I have a lot of hunting on 300/4E PF when night falls.

    Would be interesting how the Nikon lenses of that FL would focus. But I keep in mind, the 24/1.4 from Sigma saves half the bucks I spent on 24/1.4 G, and the same for the 35 and 50 - I think, even if focussing in very dark areas becomes an issue on comparatively old systems like D4 (without s) and D7000 - they blow those counterparts away in each (!) other aspect.

    I can honestly say, I never experienced Sigma lenses hunting where Nikkors would just bite the spot.
    Post edited by funtagraph on
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 845Member
    edited February 2015
    Sorry if this is a stupid question, but how does the lense brand affect the auto focus? I thought a 24/1.4 would start to hunt in the same conditions, when used on the same camera, regardless of if it is a Sigma or a Nikon.

    I understand that a 1.4 aperture lense lets in more light than a 1.8 lense, and I understand that the speed and precision of the auto focus depends on the focusing system in the lense – but otherwise, isn't it the camera that tells the lense where the focus should be?
    Post edited by snakebunk on
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    Mmmm....I guess this will be a great lens for those who do not wish to shell out the bucks for the Nikkor 24mm f/1.4. And, if it meets the previous Art lens specs...wow, a winner.

    Incidentally, my Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art has not shown to have a focusing issue in my experience. And, I have been in some dark spots...
    WBCCI_Mayberry_10.04.2014

    f/8, 5 seconds, ISO 100 Sigma 35mm f/1.4 ....focus was pretty straight forward.
    Msmoto, mod
  • sevencrossingsevencrossing Posts: 2,800Member
    edited February 2015
    but otherwise, isn't it the camera that tells the lense where the focus should be?
    Yes but it is the motor in the lens that does the focusing and I imagine, will be giving feedback to the camera

    The Nikon has a AF-S Silent Wave Motor
    The Sigma a HSM -Hyper-Sonic Motor
    No, I have not got any idea what the difference is either
    but there does seem to be a difference

    I have only hired the the Nikon the AF-S NIKKOR 24mm f/1.4G ED
    I can confirm it focuses blisteringly fast in very poor light
    Post edited by sevencrossing on
  • Vipmediastar_JZVipmediastar_JZ Posts: 1,708Member
    DPR has some snap shot test images here
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 845Member
    edited February 2015
    @sevencrossing: Ok, I guess some kind of communications problem could make a certain lense not so good at focusing in low light. Otherwise I would say it is the maximum aperture of the lense and the focus system of the camera that matters. I've been trying out my Sigma 50/1.4 A indoors in low light and it is fast to focus with the D800.

    @Vipmediastar_JZ: I think I can spot a little bit of chromatic aberation on the man standing outside. Otherwise the images look very good.
    Post edited by snakebunk on
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    edited February 2015
    Yesterday night I tried some things to find a difference between AF performance of Sigma and Nikon. I can't say "Sigma or Nikon were focussing. when the other brand stopped working". But once again I was wondering how low the light might be. And of course, all my cameras would be able to use the focus help light- I switched that off because I find it annoying for others. The D4 just doesn't have one so the "test-conditions" were the same.

    However, as Sigma has to reverse-engineer the AF mechanically and electronically as well as the firmware, I see possible sources for malfunction. Either they do copy exactly and face legal problems or they try to find different ways which might have other downsides. I don't see Nikon's AF-system as perfect, so its' possible Sigma has better solutions for all their supported mounts which don't fit into the Nikon design. It wouldn't surprise me if certain cameras behind a Sigma lens do work better or worse than others.
    Post edited by funtagraph on
  • sevencrossingsevencrossing Posts: 2,800Member
    edited February 2015
    .................otherwise I would say it is the maximum aperture of the lense and the focus system of the camera that matters......................
    No. the lens plays a big part
    Compare
    The new Nikon 80-400mm AF-S VR G ED N R
    with
    The old Nikon 80-400mm VR
    the new one focuses much faster
    Post edited by sevencrossing on
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