How many shutter actuations does/did your camera have?

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  • daveznspacedaveznspace Posts: 153Member


    Thanks.

    My D7000 is practically mint, I probably have under 5,000 shots since I bought it new. I'm asking just to see whether I should put it towards a new body or replacing the shutter. When my D40 died my parents didn't understand why I decided against fixing it. If it would have cost $300 back in 2013, there's no way I would have paid to fix the thing. A refurbished D3200 kit I think was selling for $350 recently.

    NSXTypeR said:


    If I recall correctly it was around $300... If you go to the nikon repair site and start to put in a repair it will bring you to an estimate screen... shutter isn't on there but I entered "shutter replacement" into the other box and it gave me a quote which was almost exact.

    I ended up selling that one but regretted it and bought another with under 20k actuations with a 50mm 1.8 for $325. If I was you i'd sell it now before it goes and get another since they are selling for so little. Also, if it does go and you get it fixed the shutter count usually doesn't reset so it makes it harder to sell. In my case I kept the last pic and all the nikon documents so when I did sell it the guy actually liked that I had just gotten it replaced since that gave a short warranty time and at least to him made it more attractable then the other ones that were available.


    You always hear how bad nikon service is but they've always been very good to me.

    My D7000 is practically mint, so I'm probably not going to sell it anytime soon. My plan is to shoot the camera into the ground and see what Nikon has made at that time. By that time I hope they haven't left DSLRs and moved onto something like what Sony made with SLTs. Honestly, if Nikon updated the D7200 to include some of the features of the D500 with WiFi and all I'd be a pretty happy camper.

    Glad things worked out for you.
    I'll probably sell mine soon and get a d7200 or d500 or maybe a d7100.

    I always loved my D7000 until I got a D700 and realized how much better the noise and af are on the D700, so shooting the D7000 now is kind of painful and I really like the pro body style with round eye piece as it's just easier to use.


  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    Let's see, where am I now...only up to 13,000 on the D800E, 45,000 on D4...may never need another camera....but the "want" factor...?

    As to service, actually not just Nikon, but in nearly all situations, I have found if I am less demanding, attempt to not be pushing to hard, the results are better than in my ancient past when I always thought I should be first.....LOL
    Msmoto, mod
  • nukuEX2nukuEX2 Posts: 178Member
    4379 That is less than 3% of rated design life of the shutter mechanism on the D7200.
    D7200, 40mm Micro Nikkor f2.8, Lowepro AW Hatchback 16,
  • Nikonsince1974Nikonsince1974 Posts: 78Member
    D700, about 18,000. D300, about 30,000. 1974 F2, about 3/4 mile worth of film and only been CLA'd once.
    Nikon F2S w/ MD-2, FE-2 w/ MD-12, Nikkormat FT3, Nikonos V, F4S, D700

    16mm f/2.8 Fisheye AIS, 18mm f/3.5 AIS, 24mm f/2.8 AIS, 28mm f/2.8 AI, 28mm f/3.5 and 35mm f/2.8 UW-Nikkors, 35mm f/2.8 AIS, 50mm f/1.4 non-AI (AI’d), 55mm f/2.8 AIS Micro w/ PK-13, 85mm f/1.4 AIS, 80-200 f/4 AIS, 105mm f/1.8 AIS, 180mm f/2.8 ED AIS, 300mm f/2.8 ED-IF AIS, 600mm f/4 ED-IF AIS, TC14B and TC300.

    Hasselblad 500CM with PM90 prism finder and A12/A16 backs, 40mm f/4 CF, 60mm f/3.5 CF, 80mm f/2.8 C, 150mm f/4 C and 250mm f/5.6 C lenses
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,148Member
    edited April 2018
    Ironheart said:

    On the Mac, open the jpg in Preview -> Tools -> Show Inspector
    In the window that pops-up, click on the circle with the "i" ("more info") and select "Nikon". Shutter count is right there. :-B

    That's really helpful, sorry for the late reply haha.

    I'm bumping this thread because I now have 22,723 shots on my D7000. Coming up on the amount of actuations on my D40. Not to be a debbie downer, but the GAS in me is hoping it dies so I can get a new camera. The pragmatist in me is hoping it goes for another 20,000 so I don't need to pay for a new camera.

    Post edited by NSXTypeR on
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,324Moderator
    Only another 180,000 clicks to go before you pass what it is tested to, and who knows when it will die? Better get clicking.
    Always learning.
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,148Member

    Only another 180,000 clicks to go before you pass what it is tested to, and who knows when it will die? Better get clicking.

    I know it's factory rated for 250,000 shots, but this database says otherwise about D7000 lifespan. Seems to be most of them last between 50,000 and 100,000 shots.

    http://www.olegkikin.com/shutterlife/

    Of course, there may be selection bias, as those who would likely seek out the database likely shoot their cameras hard and fast.
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • rmprmp Posts: 559Member
    I'm too old (75) to "shoot a Nikon into the ground" at the rate I take pictures. So, either this is my last camera or I just upgrade to play with a new toy. And boys need their toys.
    Robert M. Poston: D4, D810, V3, 14-24 F2.8, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200 f2.8, 80-400, 105 macro.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,324Moderator
    NSXTypeR said:

    Only another 180,000 clicks to go before you pass what it is tested to, and who knows when it will die? Better get clicking.

    I know it's factory rated for 250,000 shots, but this database says otherwise about D7000 lifespan. Seems to be most of them last between 50,000 and 100,000 shots.

    http://www.olegkikin.com/shutterlife/

    Of course, there may be selection bias, as those who would likely seek out the database likely shoot their cameras hard and fast.
    Yes, I am aware of that website, and I also think there will always be a bias towards heavy users as the rest of us hardly ever concern ourselves with the problem of shutter life. Plus, having a shutter failure would automatically make a lot of folk go looking for stats and add their experience to the pot.
    Always learning.
  • HankBHankB Posts: 222Member
    For all practical purposes, most casual shooters should expect their DSLRs to last way beyond the point it is totally obsolescent. In other words, the shutter's lifetime for most casual shooters is in the relevant range of "unlimited"!

    My 1970's Konica Autoreflex worked when I retired it [I can't remember when]. I am sure it would still work — maybe at worst, the shutter timing would be slow, requiring me to dial in a higher ASA [ASA now called ISO]
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 935Member
    HankB said:

    For all practical purposes, most casual shooters should expect their DSLRs to last way beyond the point it is totally obsolescent. In other words, the shutter's lifetime for most casual shooters is in the relevant range of "unlimited"!

    My 1970's Konica Autoreflex worked when I retired it [I can't remember when]. I am sure it would still work — maybe at worst, the shutter timing would be slow, requiring me to dial in a higher ASA [ASA now called ISO]

    Well, we all do things slightly differently. I press the shutter around 40,000 times each year, and start thinking about a new camera when I am above 100,000. Long life is another advantage of mirrorless, since the mirror mechanism won't break.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 2,142Member
    Still got a shutter...
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,324Moderator
    snakebunk said:

    HankB said:

    For all practical purposes, most casual shooters should expect their DSLRs to last way beyond the point it is totally obsolescent. In other words, the shutter's lifetime for most casual shooters is in the relevant range of "unlimited"!

    My 1970's Konica Autoreflex worked when I retired it [I can't remember when]. I am sure it would still work — maybe at worst, the shutter timing would be slow, requiring me to dial in a higher ASA [ASA now called ISO]

    Well, we all do things slightly differently. I press the shutter around 40,000 times each year, and start thinking about a new camera when I am above 100,000. Long life is another advantage of mirrorless, since the mirror mechanism won't break.
    Most shots I am taking with my D850 are using the electronic shutter only so there is no wear and tear on the mechanics. I am irritated that the shutter count even increments when used like this.
    Always learning.
  • HankBHankB Posts: 222Member
    snakebunk said:


    Well, we all do things slightly differently. I press the shutter around 40,000 times each year, and start thinking about a new camera when I am above 100,000. Long life is another advantage of mirrorless, since the mirror mechanism won't break.

    Clearly you are not a "casual shooter". I suspect a substantial number of D7000 series of owners like the OP and like me don't approach the shutter life before the camera is obsolescent and ready for replacement.
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 935Member

    snakebunk said:

    HankB said:

    For all practical purposes, most casual shooters should expect their DSLRs to last way beyond the point it is totally obsolescent. In other words, the shutter's lifetime for most casual shooters is in the relevant range of "unlimited"!

    My 1970's Konica Autoreflex worked when I retired it [I can't remember when]. I am sure it would still work — maybe at worst, the shutter timing would be slow, requiring me to dial in a higher ASA [ASA now called ISO]

    Well, we all do things slightly differently. I press the shutter around 40,000 times each year, and start thinking about a new camera when I am above 100,000. Long life is another advantage of mirrorless, since the mirror mechanism won't break.
    Most shots I am taking with my D850 are using the electronic shutter only so there is no wear and tear on the mechanics. I am irritated that the shutter count even increments when used like this.
    I understand that. Maybe there should be two counters. I have to start using live view more by the way, and try it out. As a bird photographer silence is very important at times.
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 935Member

    Still got a shutter...

    Yes, shutterless will be the next big thing. And Nikon will change mount again ;).
  • mhedgesmhedges Posts: 1,663Member
    My concern with shutterless is sensor dust. DSLR’s have the advantage of the mirror and the shutter in front of the sensor. Maybe even “shutterless” cameras would still have a simple shutter that would close when the lens is removed.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,261Member
    snakebunk said:

    Still got a shutter...

    Yes, shutterless will be the next big thing. And Nikon will change mount again ;).
    Electric shutters are already out there, but there are some issues with shorter shutter speeds. The sensors makers are getting there though. Mechanical shutters do still have some advantages though.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,148Member
    PB_PM said:


    Electric shutters are already out there, but there are some issues with shorter shutter speeds. The sensors makers are getting there though. Mechanical shutters do still have some advantages though.

    All early Nikon DSLRs with CCDs had electronic shutters actually. It's interesting, because I'm not sure exactly why they did that though. Might have been ease of implementation.

    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,261Member
    edited April 2018
    NSXTypeR said:

    PB_PM said:


    Electric shutters are already out there, but there are some issues with shorter shutter speeds. The sensors makers are getting there though. Mechanical shutters do still have some advantages though.

    All early Nikon DSLRs with CCDs had electronic shutters actually. It's interesting, because I'm not sure exactly why they did that though. Might have been ease of implementation.

    CCD sensors read all the pixels at once, thus they all had global shutters, something that is only just starting to happen with CMOS based sensors. The electric shutter on those cameras only operated at some speeds and not all the time. On the D1 for example the mechanical shutter worked up to 1/8000s and the electric only picked up after that to the max 1/16,000s.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • Ton14Ton14 Posts: 582Member
    edited April 2018
    Bought the D600, 5 years ago and Nikon changed the shutter for free. A year later they changed it again with a better one during a service and they did that once again with another better one a year later, so I have the best sensor in town with not so many shutter count. With 10.000 shots a year this D600 will last another 5 years.

    I go for image quality.

    My sobering thought is, when I see that the DxO rating of my Nikon D600 is "94", and my quality lenses perform all in the green sector. The new camera's with higher scores at the moment are very, very limited and not that much higher. What went up are the prices!!.

    I see many reviews from new camera's with spectecular photo's and I think, well I could do this 5 years ago, not so difficult and I still can.

    The marketing progress is huge, but the image quality does not improve much over the years, maybe this is the main reason that camera sales are running back.
    Post edited by Ton14 on
    User Ton changed to Ton14, Google sign in did not work anymore
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