D800 Cold Weather shutter problem, no repair from Nikon support

PrunePrune Posts: 3Member
edited May 2013 in Nikon DSLR cameras
Hi,

I had problems with my D800 since the begining. Taking picture in cold weather was sometime enfind with a "locked shutter". I had to trigger a second time to get things back in order.
This was happening whatever lense I use, and putting these lenses on my D700 at the same time never triggered the issue.

I finaly sent back the B800 to Nikon support for repair.
The D800 was shipped back the next day with a "no problem found" status.

Went out for shooting today (12 degres celcius) and the shutter problem is STILL HERE, even worse !!

What do you thing should be my next move ?
Post edited by Msmoto on
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  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    I would return it to where you got it and ask them to exchange it.
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
  • MikeGunterMikeGunter Posts: 543Member
    Hi all,

    @Prune - I _assume_ you mean -12° C which is 10° F and is not very cold for the camera's shutter mechanism. Routinely my cameras have gone much, much colder than that without failure.

    I would check the menu, especially those items that have to do with anything that keeps the shutter open or mirror up - there are a few such as cleaning the sensor, Mirror up, etc.,

    Of course, the camera could be defective, but since Nikon has checked it out, the defect must be hard to find.

    If it is still sticky, try a reset, change the lens and give another go. Remember, it can be the CPU in the lens that is talking to the camera.

    My best,

    Mike
  • JohnJohn Posts: 134Member
    Given the statement that Nikon has checked the camera out and that nothing is wrong I think that you have put the camera in Mup mode.
    It's one of the release modes that are located on the dial left of the flash.
    (others are quite shutter release, single shot, continuous high speed,...)

    In Mup mode the first press of the trigger moves the mirror up and the second press will release the shutter and bring the mirror back down.
    Sounds like what you're seeing.

    The D800 is a pro build body and has been used in Antarctica.
    I have personally used it at -15°C without a single issue.
    12°C is no problem at all.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    @Prune

    What do you mean by "even worse"?

    "Went out for shooting today (12 degres celcius) and the shutter problem is STILL HERE, even worse !!"
    Msmoto, mod
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,039Member
    Slightly off topic, but what temperature range are the D800 or D4 bodies rated for anyway?
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    edited May 2013
    The limiting factor as best I can tell is the fact the battery will become very inefficient at temperatures below 0°C. I think this is why Nikon suggests keeping a spare battery in a warm location so one can switch to a warm battery every few minutes. A cold battery does gain a lot of its capacity back when warmed to near body temp.

    The other option is to have a battery in a warm pocket with a cord to the camera.

    As to Nikon ever publishing a temperature.... I doubt they would do this. They do not even know how tight to torque the tripod socket screw.

    Prune....are you still with us?
    Post edited by Msmoto on
    Msmoto, mod
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    Page 431 for the D800 states 0 to 40 °C (32 to 104 °F) and max 85% humidity non-condensing.
    Pagr 438 for the D4 same specs.

    We know these limits are exceeded every day, including the non-condensing one.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    @Ironheart Thanks....

    And, I see what is published, but I think these are a "disclaimer" type if information. It mainly makes it possible for them to state one should not operate below freezing.

    But, most of us have had our cameras out in weather much colder than freezing and found they did just fine. Think Winter Olympics....

    High temps are related to battery issues as follows:
    P. 24 D4 Manual has info on charging the battery and states "battery will not charge if its temperature is below 0 °C (32 °F) or above 60 °C (140 °F)."

    P. 27 "charging times increase at battery temperatures from 0 °C/
    32 °F to 15 °C/59 °F and from 45 °C/113 °F to 60 °C/140 °F."

    As always, I learn everyday on NRF. I wonder if anyone has asked Nikon about shooting the Winter Olympics? LOL :))

    Prune...are you there?
    Msmoto, mod
  • ibecameweibecamewe Posts: 32Member
    Hi Msmoto
    i looking for one camera of my photography...... Nikon D800 is right for or not ?
  • RJRRJR Posts: 3Member
    Hi Prune
    Is your camera working okay now? I have the same problem, the camera has been back to Nikon twice for this issue.
    The problem has occurred in both cold weather and now indoors at room temperature?
    The second time it was sent away they replaced some of the batteries but its still happening!!! Can you help?
  • JohnJohn Posts: 134Member
    Hi Prune
    Is your camera working okay now? I have the same problem, the camera has been back to Nikon twice for this issue.
    The problem has occurred in both cold weather and now indoors at room temperature?
    The second time it was sent away they replaced some of the batteries but its still happening!!! Can you help?
    Prune has only made this one post so I don't think you'll get an answer.
    The D800 has a few modes that might cause what you think is an issue.
    First there is Mup, which is located next to the other release modes (timer, single release, continuous low speed release, continuous high speed release).
    In Mup mode the mirror goes up the first time that you push the shutter. The second time that you press the shutter the curtain opens, the sensor gets the exposure and the mirror moves down again.
    This mode exists to use on a tripod so you can wait until the small vibrations from the mirror going up are gone before you make the exposure. (For when you want the image to be as sharp as possible)
    But if you're in this mode without knowing then you might think that the mirror is stuck.
    The second cause of such behavior might be exposure delay. Somewhere in the setting menu you can configure the D800 so that it waits a few seconds after the mirror goes up before making the exposure.
    The reason for this is the same as with the Mup mode; to wait until all the vibrations are gone.

    The chances of temperature being an issue are slim.
    I have personally used my D800 in blizzard conditions where my entire body hurt from the extreme cold and snow blowing around but my camera just kept on going. People have used it in the arctic and antarctic.
    That's not to say that you should just keep your camera out in freezing temperatures. It's best to keep it warm and protected in a nice stuffed bag. But that has more to do with keeping the batteries up and running then with the mechanical parts.

    Do you have the same issue when you use live view?
  • ChasCSChasCS Posts: 309Member
    After reading this short interview, I thought it was pertinent, so I would share it within the above thread.

    This Nikon D800 Survived Four Hours in -5ºC Weather

    image
    Photos courtesy of Stian Hagen

    Many folks who purchase the Nikon D800 treat it like their baby and aren’t aware of just how much abuse the camera was designed to take. In fact, you’d be pleasantly surprised. Photographer Alexandre Buisse was shooting a campaign in some frigid weather when he looked down at his Nikon D800 and noticed just how cold it was looking. Amazingly, the camera continued to function.

    We asked Alex a couple of questions about the shoot and about the camera. Be sure to also follow Alex on Facebook.


    Phoblographer: What was the premise and creative concept behind the shoot?

    Alex: The brief for this shoot was from Canadian technical clothing manufacturer Arc’teryx, and was about how their garments protect climbers when the weather has made a turn for the worse. Put simply, it was: go shoot some alpine climbing in stormy conditions. I had freedom of date and location, and was lucky (in a way) that we had a series of big fronts moving in the Western Alps in the past few days. The forecast was actually for a mixed day slowly deteriorating, but we found a full on storm when we stepped out of Aiguille du Midi, and just rolled with it.

    image

    Phoblographer: How did your D800 get that frozen solid?

    Alex: I shot for about 4 hours, in temperatures of about -5ºC (windchill excluded), with winds of up to 50km/h from which we were occasionally sheltered, and nearly constant precipitation. The camera was out the whole time, either in my hands or attached to my climbing harness via a Peak Design Capture v2.
    http://www.thephoblographer.com/2013/08/12/review-peak-design-capture-clip-pro/

    Phoblographer: Did it continue to function without any flaws or issues during the shoot?

    Alex: It worked flawlessly, as I expected. The main problem I faced was that the viewfinder would get instantly obscured, as would my sunglasses, so framing was extremely challenging. It was good to be able to rely on fully automatic autofocus on the wide lens, though. The front element also fogged/froze very quickly, so I had to wipe it clean every few minutes.


    It's good to know my D800 camera is built to withstand the elements, & will survive these Canadian Arctic Blizzards, Brrr!!
    D800, AF-S NIKKOR 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR, B+W Clear MRC 77mm, AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR, Sigma DG UV 77mm,
    SB-910~WG-AS3, SB-50, ME-1, Lexar Professional 600x 64GB SDXC UHS-I 90MB/s* x2, 400x 32GB SDHC UHS-I 60MB/s* x1
    Vanguard ALTA PRO 263AT, GH-300T, SBH-250, SBH-100, PH-22 Panhead
    Lowepro S&F Deluxe Technical Belt and Harness ~ Pouch 60 AW 50 AW & 10, S&F Toploader 70 AW, Lens Case 11 x 26cm
    FE, NIKKOR 2-20mm f/1.8, OPTEX UV 52mm, Vivitar Zoom 285, Kodacolor VR 1000 CF 135-24 EXP DX 35mm, rePlay XD1080

  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    @ibecamewe

    Sorry for not responding earlier…IMO a D800 will handle almost all needs. I prefer the D4 for my use, however. Or, maybe a used D3s if one can find this. For a landscape specialist….D610 or D800E may be more apropos.
    Msmoto, mod
  • Rx4PhotoRx4Photo Posts: 1,200Member
    My personal experience: Last January, Steamboat Springs, Colorado - spent hours with a D800 in temps as low as 13 below zero Fahrenheit (negative 25 Celsius). Not a problem at all.
    D800 | D7000 | Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 | 24-70mm f/2.8 | 70-200mm f/2.8 | 35mm f/1.8G | 85mm f/1.4G | Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM | Zeiss 100mm Makro-Planar ZF.2 | Flash controllers: Phottix Odin TTL

  • JakesGTJakesGT Posts: 38Member
    I've even used my D3100 in around 10*F and it has also seen dust, rain, snow and still functions perfectly
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 732Member
    Living in Greenland it is impossible to not have your gear get beaten up when you step outside. I treat my things like there is no tomorrow, and thus far my D800 and my D7000 have fully lived up to expectations. I have had salt water spots on my sensors (self-cleaned), the D7000 screen fogged up ON THE INSIDE and that cleared up as well, and my D800 trigger was stuck due to snow, for half a day, but that cleared itself up when put on a towel, over a radiator.

    On one occasion my wristwatch ended up with condensation on the inside, I had frostbite in my left cheek, I lost most of my eyebrows, but my D7000 performed, and I got some excellent pics:)

    I am actually more worried about all the extras, like GPS, flashes, etc. The D800 and pro lenses are weather sealed, but not the extras:(

    Basically, keep pushing the envelope... it is "just" gear...
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    @Killerbob

    I love to see folks push the equipment "to the edge". I tend to shoot images sometimes near the technical edge, but no longer go out in conditions like you do. Keep up the good work.
    Msmoto, mod
  • PhotobugPhotobug Posts: 4,536Member
    @Killerbob

    I love to see folks push the equipment "to the edge". I tend to shoot images sometimes near the technical edge, but no longer go out in conditions like you do. Keep up the good work.
    Was that a nice way to say you leave this extreme weather for the "younger" photographers? LoL

    :))
    D750 & D7100 | 24-70 F2.8 G AF-S ED, 70-200 F2.8 AF VR, TC-14E III, TC-1.7EII, 35 F2 AF D, 50mm F1.8G, 105mm G AF-S VR | Backup & Wife's Gear: D5500 & Sony HX50V | 18-140 AF-S ED VR DX, 55-300 AF-S G VR DX |
    |SB-800, Amaran Halo LED Ring light | MB-D16 grip| Gitzo GT3541 + RRS BH-55LR, Gitzo GM2942 + Sirui L-10 | RRS gear | Lowepro, ThinkTank, & Hoodman gear | BosStrap | Vello Freewave Plus wireless Remote, Leica Lens Cleaning Cloth |
  • ThomasHortonThomasHorton Posts: 323Member
    I also like it when other people take their gear to the edge. :)

    I tend to baby my equipment. :)
    Gear: Camera obscura with an optical device which transmits and refracts light.
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 732Member
    I was just out the night before yesterday, for about an hour, in a -12c howling snowstorm. Unfortunately the pics turned out not so good, except I finally got the WB right.

    When I got inside I did my usual routine; 1) quick dry-over with a towel, 2) leaving lens on body, but disconnect L-frame and batt. grip and dry these down, 3) take off UV filter and clean in running water, and 4) leave camera (w. lens) sitting for 30 min. on a towel on top of a normal warm radiator. After about 30 min. take the lens of the body, and quickly clean up the F-mount on the body, as well as the lens. Finally polish the filter.

    Only a few times have I had condensation on the sensor, but that's easy to clean up. Frozen shutters are worse:)

  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    edited December 2013
    In a few weeks I will be in Detroit, Michigan, and hopefully doing a shoot at the NAIAS. Last year the average temperature in the AM was about -18° C sometimes colder. This year, I promise…LOL….to step outside and shoot some images of the cold….
    Post edited by Msmoto on
    Msmoto, mod
  • CaulemosCaulemos Posts: 3Member
    Hello guys, I'm new in the forum and found this thread by searching the web. I just got back from the Yukon Territory for a northern lights hunt. I had the D800 exposed by 30 minutes on a minus 37 C temp. After defrosting it inside the cabin, all worked fine but the Sigma 24-70 2.8 had an AF malfunction and is gone now , I'm impressed with the camera but the lens let me down.
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 732Member
    edited December 2013
    Welcome to the forum Caulemos.

    I think you would find that the Nikon 24-70mm would have fared better. I have had my Nikon out in a Greenlandic snowstorm, with a windchill of -25c. Had the thing entirely soaked in snow and the only thing I seriously spend time on afterwards was getting the Hoya filter back to life...
    Post edited by Killerbob on
  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    Sorry, I DID look for older threads on the topic. Found this one: http://nikonrumors.com/forum/topic.php?id=3059 but couldn't figure out how to refresh it on this forum. I found it helpful, regarding the re-sealable bag trick. I also removed the memory card and batteries from my D40 after shooting outdoors. We've been having our annual ice in North Texas lately.
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
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