street photography the who the what and the pictures

VipmediastarVipmediastar Posts: 55Member
edited May 2013 in General Discussions
Who does street photography? What are your experiences with people. I tend to be shy and try to capture candids with a zoom. Today I took a pic of a couple with the 85mm while I was walking and it took a few shots but missed the kiss. Just the moment before the last kiss.

What are your techniques? I try to kook for shadows but I only have about 40mins per day to work with and I don't always find them.

I have been doing street this year alternating my lens. I am one step closer to getting the sigma 35mm 1.4 or Fuji x100s.

Reason for this is because no matter what my neck and back hurts on top of that I have flat feet so even with foot inserts at the end of the day I'm beyond tired.

I been shooting with the HTC one as well and the camera according to a site is equivalent at 35mm just like the Fuji 100s. I like the HTC one field of view but of course I need higher res photos.

90% of my work this year has been street photos. this weekend I'll head to navy pier with the family and catch some fireworks. For that I'll be carrying the 24-70.

In today's photo a day I posted one of my typical street photos when I had the d600 for two weeks before upgrading to d800.

Share your photos or experiences. What do you do when people give you the stink eye or when onother photagrapher gives you a look when you take photos of his session?

Last week I ran into a photographer and we exchange cards for future reference. Networking is great.
Post edited by Vipmediastar on
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Comments

  • mikepmikep Posts: 280Member
    edited May 2013
    i have a folder full of the stink eye!

    everyone a camera phone, everyone takes pictures in public, and everyone looks AT pictures taken in pubic and enjoys them. stink eye people are huge hypocrites! find me a person who has never taken a picture in public?! not possible! i think most of them are simply mentally deranged

    the weirdest ones are when you catch one in the corner of a wide angle .... the camera is not pointing anywhere near them, but they still look at you like you are dirt on their shoe ..... deranged i say !

    im gonna stick em all on a blog sooner or later
    Post edited by mikep on
  • JJ_SOJJ_SO Posts: 1,158Member
    edited May 2013
    I wanna get asked for permission (with eye-contact or verbally) before somebody takes a photo from me. I guess, others want to be asked by me in the vice versa situation, too. And I don't think, great street photographers got their interesting shots by disrespecting people and just take their shots of whoever they wanted. I mean, how do I know what this guy is doing with my portrait? Using it for something I never want to be used for?

    A photographer needs to be able to tell honestly what his interest is. If he can't or is not willing to, why should one be willing to model for free? I'm looking forward to the comments of other Europeans. In Europe each person has a right not to be portrayed unwillingly. A photog disrespecting that can get in serious trouble. Of course, it's not always possible to ask before a situation happens - a smile can work wonder, while hidden shooting will always upset the "victim". People are not doing what they're doing to give me cute subjects and it's really difficult to ask at the right time, using the right words. But then it's on me to improve my contact abilities, isn't it?
    Post edited by JJ_SO on
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    In the USA, where I do almost all of my shots, I have a variety of techniques. My relationship with my subjects is always one of respect. However, I can be rather coercive and strongly encourage folks to allow me to photograph them. But, if someone clearly indicates they do not want the image captured, I move on.

    Legally in the USA photography in public places is a protected right of the photographer. Again, any conflict must be avoided. In the relationship of subject/photog this will often be seen in the photo. Humans reflect the attitude of the photog. I see this all the time in model shots by those who have personality issues yet are very good at the technical aspects of photography. The result is the people they shoot look like wax figures. True whether the subject is a model or street person.

    Talking to the subject often gets some great shots. Giving someone the impression you do respect them, be they on the street or on the stage, is important.

    Having had a career in "reading" people I generally know as I approach how it is going to go. But street photography is IMO the ultimate place to be......I might be a paparazzi wannabe.... :))
    Msmoto, mod
  • mikepmikep Posts: 280Member
    edited May 2013
    i really dont see how laws regarding this are remotely enforceable, and can never be universal as all things are owned by someone - unless you were to limit yourself to pictures only of government buildings and parks or your own house, and pay your models.

    i couldnt care less if someone wants to take my picture, or even follow me around all day and take videos of me. a team of photographers can watch me in the bathroom for all i care.

    but like i said, show me a person who has never taken a photo in a public place ? they do not exist ...
    Post edited by mikep on
  • mikepmikep Posts: 280Member
    edited May 2013
    what about something like this? (imagine they were all in focus)

    if permission is required ...? well, it is impossible to obtain permission from all, and even if it were possible to ask them all, there will likely be one or more who will refuse .... so what is the solution? everybody in the developed world has a camera in their pockets all the time

    imagine taking a picture of a crowd of 10,000 people ....

    nara park
    Post edited by mikep on
  • FlowtographyBerlinFlowtographyBerlin Posts: 477Member
    +1 for @Msmoto

    @mikep: This type of framing is surely not what Msmoto was talking about.
  • blandbland Posts: 811Member
    I cheat and shoot from a distance.

    Distant Shot
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    Here is a set of images taken with the 24-120mm on a D90....I think
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/fantinesfotos/sets/72157628680066583/
    Not one of these folks spoke to me as they were just faces in the crowd.

    And, these are shot with most of the folks having some communication verbally or other. With kids, I always give parents a card so they know how to get the photos.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/fantinesfotos/sets/72157630428070462/
    Msmoto, mod
  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    I have found that, for me, the best gear to shot with is a 35 or 50mm prim lens. Pointing a long telephoto lens toward people has a way to startling them and thus I lose that whole "natural" activity taking place. Now this is when, I'm just walking around and shooting away. However, when I'm stationed at a spot, I pull out the 70-200 and mount it on my monopod and shoot away. This usually happens at a big event taking place like a car show, marathon, large conventions (i.e. Comic-Con).
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member
    edited May 2013
    Sometimes I just snap away. But just as often I'd just start to talk to people and then take their picture.

    E.g., the first day I got my Coolpix A from Amazon, I walked to a nearby "park" to take some test shots.

    image
    (Lady, Lincoln Square, Chicago)

    I met this very nice lady sitting on a bench and introduced myself. We had a wonderful chat about life, marriage, children, etc. With a 28mm equivalent lens, you have to get up close and personal.

    image
    (Street musicians, Lincoln Square, Chicago)

    With the street musicians, I listened to them play for awhile, put a couple of dollars into the donation case and pulled out the Coolpix. I didn't want to take a picture of just them playing so when I saw some bicyclists coming I just waited until I got the shot I wanted.

    Some of the pictures turned out great, others just so so. In all it was a successful test for the Coolpix.
    Post edited by Ade on
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    edited May 2013
    @Ade

    +1

    "Sometimes I just snap away. But just as often I'd just start to talk to people and then take their picture."
    Post edited by Msmoto on
    Msmoto, mod
  • kenadamskenadams Posts: 222Member
    I think that in a couple of particular situations, direct eye contact between the subject and the camera is desirable without any doubt. However, most of the time, my approach to (street) photography is strictly heisenbergian: you can't watch something without altering its state in some way. People, mostly, behave differently when there's a camera around. I personally prefer the unaltered version.
  • VipmediastarVipmediastar Posts: 55Member
    edited May 2013
    I really try to avoid taking peoples photos but I set up the camera where people are not the main subject simply part of the photo. However I do take random Candids. Sometimes I see the "perfect" shot but I decide to just observe the moment.

    I find the most interesting shots are candids and unusual people such as a person with a leather suit in hot weather, a guy with a fancy beard and mustache. I try to catch those. As for homeless people I find them interesting but I choose to not photograph them. About 5 years ago I framed my shot and one walked into it. When he saw me he quickly grabbed his stuff and walked away. The look in his face made me feel bad and I haven't had the desire to take a photo of them.

    Yesterday we had awesome cloudy skies and I should have had the 50mm or 24-70. I missed the scenery but tried my best with the 85mm.

    When I got home I took a few landscapes with the 50mm on my way to a graduation dinner.

    Today we have rain and the subject is rainboots and umbrellas. I don't feel shy here as peoples faces will probably not interact at all.

    I have the 24-70 to capture the scene as much as possible

    The sound of the shutter is music to my ears.

    Post edited by Vipmediastar on
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  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    The interaction with someone who is homeless is in my case an exchange of photo for money. I almost always ask, evaluate the situation, then work the model to get the photo I want. My payment is generally USD $2. However, in the pre-photo interview, I often ask if they have any outstanding arrest warrants, quickly emphasizing I do not want to take their photo if this is the case. HAving spent most of my life interviewing folks, I find this technique works best for me.

    I am also aware of my surroundings and if there is a question about what may be developing, I either take a friend with me to watch my back or leave the area if it is too threatening.
    Msmoto, mod
  • VipmediastarVipmediastar Posts: 55Member
    I was out sick for a while but during that time interesting things happened.
    One I met a New York times photographer that gave me awesome advice with architecture and light. I learned a few things. Among them is that I'm doing what he wants to do and that's walking around and enjoying taking photos. I want to do what he is doing. Getting paid and having photos published. Well that is something to think about. My goal is to get published but for now I need to improve.

    This week I started out good. I approached a group advertising an event and I actually had the courage to talk to them and took some nice shots of the group. I know have another great connection.

    I don't know why I lost my charisma and fearless attitude but I hope to overcome it.

    Yesterday I saw a homeless person and their dog. I was unable to approach them but I did see a dog treat food van stop and give the dog treats. That filled me with joy. If I see them today I will make an effort to get them both some food.

    I ran into an article that is a 31 day tutorial on how to overcome your fear of street photography. I know I can't post links but if you are interedted in it let me know.

    Happy shooting folks.

    www.vipmediastar.com
  • proudgeekproudgeek Posts: 1,422Member
    I enjoy shooting street musicians but I always a) make eye contact and get a nod in return, and b) drop a little money in their basket.
    _DSC2650 (1)
    _DSC7804 (1)
    _DSC3559 (1)

    I've never been comfortable taking pictures of people walking down the street. I wouldn't want someone shooting me. Different strokes I guess.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,973Member
    edited June 2013

    ...everyone a camera phone, everyone takes pictures in public, and everyone looks AT pictures taken in pubic and enjoys them. stink eye people are huge hypocrites! find me a person who has never taken a picture in public?! not possible! i think most of them are simply mentally deranged...
    Yes everyone takes photos in public, but that does not mean everyone purposely takes photos of individual people in public. Those are two very different things. I never intentionally go out of my way to take photos of people in public, ever. Do I sometimes get images with people in them, yup, but individual people in the photos are never the purpose of the image.

    We seem to live in an age where being a voyeuristic, self entitled, ethically deprived person is highly valued. I do not share that sentiment. Does that make me deranged? If so, I'm glad. :P

    By that last statement I am pointing my finger at aggressive street photographers who shove their cameras in the face of unwilling subjects.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • VipmediastarVipmediastar Posts: 55Member
    Nice street musician photos. I need to carry cash from now on. I'll keep an eye out for them.

    PB_PM I hear you. I would never shove my camera in somebodys face. In Chicago it wouldnt go very well.
    www.vipmediastar.com
  • jjdarlingjjdarling Posts: 59Member
    edited June 2013
    I drop money into a street musician's hat/case/whatever sometimes, but I drop a business card in there always.

    If somebody is performing in public, I never ask permission, I actually try not to get noticed before the shot, as I want to catch them in the moment. If somebody is out in public but not performing or otherwise being conspicuous, I generally ask permission (even if it's after the shot).
    Post edited by jjdarling on
    www.jjdarling.com
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    Here is an interesting photo taken inside the Chicago Art Institute....and what surprised me was he did not even come over to see what I was doing, just walked away. So, I 'read" that he did not want an interaction.

    Chicago IV 04.26.13-22
    Msmoto, mod
  • FlowtographyBerlinFlowtographyBerlin Posts: 477Member

    Yes everyone takes photos in public, but that does not mean everyone purposely takes photos of individual people in public. Those are two very different things.

    We seem to live in an age where being a voyeuristic, self entitled, ethically deprived person is highly valued. I do not share that sentiment. Does that make me deranged? If so, I'm glad. :P
    +1

    With many exclamation marks!
  • Rx4PhotoRx4Photo Posts: 1,200Member
    edited June 2013
    @ msmoto, he does have somewhat of a disturbed look across the eyes - probably not very used to being the subject. That's the reason that I've mostly stopped shooting people who're looking directly at me without asking first. If they're far enough away and looking I'll simply motion with my finger toward them and then point to my camera while giving the raised eyebrow look (presumptively asking "may I take your picture").

    If their attention is elsewhere then yes, I'll reel off a shot or two if the scene or pose is interesting enough. I just like to avoid that strange feeling that I did something that someone didn't like so much. My slowly moving 100 Strangers Project gives me the chance to get them to pose based on direction of light, for me to meet them, direct a bit, and walk away without an awkward feeling - which is a big plus if we happen to pass by one another 15 minutes later.

    Street bands and performers are totally different - all fair game. After all, they're putting themselves out there on purpose. They want the attention and publicity.
    Post edited by Rx4Photo on
    D800 | D7000 | Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 | 24-70mm f/2.8 | 70-200mm f/2.8 | 35mm f/1.8G | 85mm f/1.4G | Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM | Zeiss 100mm Makro-Planar ZF.2 | Flash controllers: Phottix Odin TTL

  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    The concept of a photograph is simply recording a moment in time. If, however, the image is used in a negative manner which could be harmful, that is another matter. This individual was, IMO, probably irritated about other things. He simply looked at me and demonstrated his affect.

    In the particular venue, the Art Institute of Chicago, folks are running around shooting all the people and the art on the wall, and I am guessing he was also doing the same thing I was.

    Had he come over and made any objection, I would have delete the images in front of him.....or talked cameras...
    Msmoto, mod
  • Rx4PhotoRx4Photo Posts: 1,200Member
    I must stay that I do like his setup. Black Rapid on the tripod mount with a slip-knotted wrist strap on the right camera strap mount.
    D800 | D7000 | Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 | 24-70mm f/2.8 | 70-200mm f/2.8 | 35mm f/1.8G | 85mm f/1.4G | Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM | Zeiss 100mm Makro-Planar ZF.2 | Flash controllers: Phottix Odin TTL

  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,030Moderator
    I read that he saw your Nikon and didn't like being reminded he made the wrong decision... :P
    Always learning.
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