I'm new to this. Nikon D5200?

isewcuteisewcute Posts: 15Member
edited January 2013 in Nikon DSLR cameras
Hi everyone,
I'm very much into art, music, and sewing. I am now wanting to get into photography. My friend owns a lighting company and does lighting for bands, festivals, and weddings. I am wanting to purchase a camera that I can use to take photos at his gigs. The plan is to make a few extra bucks to use for school and my spending habits. I was looking into purchasing the Nikon D5200. I like that this model has a movable screen, which I think will have to be a must for concert photos. I don't know much about photography, so I am looking into books and reading online as much as I can. I also see I need a camera with a high ISO setting. If anyone has any input as to which lenses, accessories, or models I should look into it would be much appreciated.

Thank you for taking the time to read this,
Connie
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Comments

  • isewcuteisewcute Posts: 15Member
    I was looking to spend $1,000 to $1,500. I don't mind spending more, however, I'm just starting out and don't know how deep in I will get into it.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,363Member
    The D5200 might be a good choice. The first lesson in photography is to spend more on lenses than cameras.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • soapsoap Posts: 28Member
    There are not any good hard numbers available yet from what I've seen in regards to the 5200's ISO performance. Nikon has stressed that the 5200 sensor is not the same as the 3200 sensor, and allows higher ISOs. The 5100, 3200, 7000, and even 3100 all have pretty similar ISO performance (with the 3100 being slightly behind). IF Nikon's claims are true the 5200 would be the best performing (ISO wise) DX camera available.

    The 5200 gets the 7000's meter and AF system (as opposed to the lesser ones in the 5100) which is another mark in its favor.

    The 5x00 series can not, though, (Unlike the 7000) use its pop-up flash to control remote Nikon flashes. Depending on the sorts of lighting situations you envision this is a possible downmark.
  • shawninoshawnino Posts: 453Member
    PB_PM alludes to the most important point: the Nikon DX bodies are all at least pretty good these days. You're not going to pick a loser no matter what you pick. In your research what you'll really need to keep in mind is whether you'll be able to shoot from up close or whether you'll need the lens to reach. If you can "zoom with your feet" you're likely all set as there are very affordable f/1.8 primes below 100mm that will do well in low light. If you need reach/serious-zoom functionality in low light, the lens alone could be $1500.
  • isewcuteisewcute Posts: 15Member
    I would mostly be shooting from the front of the stage as I would have "all access" to the venue.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,427Moderator
    I don't want to confuse you at this stage, the 5200 is a good choice BUT you should be aware that it does not have the focus motor in the body that the D7000 has, so lenses will basically cost you more. That said, auditoriums have poor light so you may well need large maximum aperture lenses which are crazy prices.

    Can you tell us what kind of pics you want to take and what sort or distances? If you are stuck up the back with the light engineer for instance you will need to use medium to telephoto lenses whereas if you are able to get close, you can think about a fast 50mm or 35mm. which is good AND cheap - the medium to telephoto choices can cost you many times as much. Think 70-200 VR F4 or 70-200 f2.8 VRII - ouch.

    EDIT: I see you posted while I was typing - the cheaper fast primes are available to you which is good news!
    Always learning.
  • isewcuteisewcute Posts: 15Member
    I was looking at the D7000. But it didn't have as many megapixels or a tilty screen. Picking out a camera that "does it all" is hard.
  • shawninoshawnino Posts: 453Member
    All access is great news. As s-n-p mentions, the 3000- and 5000-series bodies will not autofocus the D lenses (so I kind of went on a rant in another thread against them) but even if you go that way as opposed to a D90 or 7000, the G-lenses the 3000- and 5000-series will focus are well within your budget. If you started with your body of choice, and a 50 or 35 f/1.8 (wouldn't need both) you'd be in under $1000. The next step, if you found you were having fun, might be the 85 1.8 if you felt you needed something longer, or something wider if you needed a larger angle of view.
  • shawninoshawnino Posts: 453Member
    As you get more comfortable with your gear, I've got good news: the tilty screen and MP will become far less important to you, I think. Nikon's most expensive body ($6K or thereabouts) has a fixed screen (I think; I've never held one in my hand) and "only" 16MP (for sure). Good photographers do often use expensive gear, sure, but the better your technique gets, in some sense the less important the gear becomes.

    Here's hoping you enjoy yourself.
  • isewcuteisewcute Posts: 15Member
    Ok. So not to sound like a arse, but is a 50 or 35 f/1.8 a special lens you are talking about? Do you have a link as to specifically speaking of? Derp.
  • isewcuteisewcute Posts: 15Member
    I'm going to the bookstore after work to pick up DSLR book for dummies.
  • shawninoshawnino Posts: 453Member
    Links from B&H (which I think is a site sponsor...)
    The 35:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/606792-USA/Nikon_2183_AF_S_Nikkor_35mm_f_1_8G.html
    One of the versions of the 50:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/766516-USA/Nikon_2199_AF_S_Nikkor_50mm_f_1_8G.html

    You'll read all about it in your books, but the smaller the f-number, the better the lens can do in low light (although it's only one element of the equation...there are other settings, like ISO and shutter speedand of course your skill is important). Very quick rule of thumb:
    F/2 or lower number (1.4, 1.8...) is excellent in low light
    f/2.8 very good
    f/4 depends on the overall quality of the lens more
    f/5.6 is a struggle.
    These aren't absolutes. Overall lens quality and your own skill are the true deciders. But it's a rule of thumb.

  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,427Moderator
    OK, as you are going to buy a camera anyway, you have nothing to lose by going out and buying the D5200 and 50mm f1.8G lens and start using it while you learn. Buy body only not as a kit as your needs mean that the kit lens wouldn't help you other than general photography at other times. I would normally say to DX shooters not to buy the 50 but to go for the 35 HOWEVER it depends in your case on how close you are to your subjects - I think you will be more than 15 feet away so the 50 would be better. Buy it and read as many books as you can. Don't waste your time reading too many forums as they unfortunately teach you more about how you need to upgrade your gear than how to use it or help you with composition etc.

    Always learning.
  • isewcuteisewcute Posts: 15Member
    Thanks guys. You rock. Now, I just have to wait for the 5200 to get to Best Buy so I can buy it.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    Welcome to NRF....the first thing to do is to either join a camera club where you can ask about ten questions per day or to take a photography course at a local Tech School. A book may get you to at least some basics, but when it comes to shooting in difficult venues...you are going to need some guidance, most likely.

    Once you have a camera, take ti out and shoot everything you can find. Try moving objects, stationary objects, people, and shoot some at night with no flash. Just do it.

    Then come back to your computer and download the photos and see where you made errors. Out of the two hundred you first shoot, pick out three that you think are good. Delete all the rest.

    Do this again, same process, shoot download, edit, delete.

    You will learn more by struggling with the owner's manual and looking things up than by asking and having the answer in front of you.

    Let us know how you are doing....
    Msmoto, mod
  • heartyfisherheartyfisher Posts: 3,181Member
    edited January 2013
    Hi, and welcome to NRF.

    Can I suggest that the standard kit lens is really all you need for now with the D5200. The 18-105 is a nice enough lense. and F3.5 at the wide end is really not too much above F2.8 from the pro lenses that cost $1500. The D5200 has good High ISO and you should be able to get good pictures. Stage lighting is really quite bright.

    For weddings where you cant control the lighting as much a 1.8 lens either the 35 or 50 is also a good choice but I think that is for later if you find you need it.

    I do some event shooting and stuff and yes a fast(F2.8) zoom is good but usually expensive. However, If you can wait and get the new rumored D7200. That would be a good option for using old lenses that don't have a focus motor. If you cant wait, the D7000 is good too. My fav lens for shooting events and portraits is the old NIKKOR 35-70 F2.8 and can be got for a very reasonable price secondhand. http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/350676676172 { sorry wrong one .. i meant the F2.8 version eg here .. http://www.ebay.com/itm/No-1025-Nikon-NIKKOR-AF-35-70mm-F2-8-D-Japanese-lens-Good-/261144305335 }

    Still the stage event lighting is really a challenge. It is unlikely that the auto exposure will work well.. You will need to learn how to set the camera manually for ISO Aperture and Shutter speed.

    I will see if i can dig up some examples ..
    Post edited by heartyfisher on
    Moments of Light - D610 D7K S5pro 70-200f4 18-200 150f2.8 12-24 18-70 35-70f2.8 : C&C very welcome!
    Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.

  • heartyfisherheartyfisher Posts: 3,181Member
    edited January 2013
    Ok here are a few ones I found.. taken with my kit lense.

    These taken with the 18-200 F3.5-F5.6 Shutter speed between 1/30 to 1/60
    ISO 640
    image

    ISO 320
    image

    This taken with my 150 F2.8 tele.. at 1600ISO
    image

    again with the 18-200 kit lens with bounce flash. ISO 200
    image
    image
    Post edited by heartyfisher on
    Moments of Light - D610 D7K S5pro 70-200f4 18-200 150f2.8 12-24 18-70 35-70f2.8 : C&C very welcome!
    Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.

  • isewcuteisewcute Posts: 15Member
    Thanks everyone for your help! I have been stalking Best Buy and they should have there cameras Thursday or Friday. I can't wait to get it. Now I have to research on Flash accessories and decide which one is for me.
    :)
  • isewcuteisewcute Posts: 15Member
  • SymphoticSymphotic Posts: 704Member
    Heartyfisher: Great shots. I'd like to more of your work, but I couldn't find you on Flickr...
    Jack Roberts
    "Discovery consists in seeing what everyone else has seen and thinking what nobody else has thought"--Albert Szent-Gyorgy
  • shawninoshawnino Posts: 453Member
    Heartyfisher: First off, amazing shots.

    Second, is the 18-105 what's shipping with the D5200?

    Third, even if it is, as opposed to 18-55, it's more about speed to me. If I was going into challenging lighting conditions and I didn't have something that was f/2.8 or faster, I'd feel naked. OP intends to make a little money at this, so the $200 for a 35 or 50 1.8 that will not blow out OP's budget seems exceptionally well spent, even if it is only a piece of insurance three-quarters the time.

    I'm not trying to criticize kit lenses--a lot of the time they're great. But the second conditions get tough, we need better tools and/or better technique (assuming the light co-operates at all). OP won't be able to lean on technique for a little while, so a cheap f/1.8 should get OP a bunch of images that might not be gotten otherwise.
  • NeopulseNeopulse Posts: 4Member
    If you wanna cut corners. Try getting the camera online which you'll avoid that extra tax. Also the fact that you want a camera that can kinda of do everything is a tall order to fill :( But I think the D5200 with the kit lenses like the 18-55mm and 55-300mm (or the 70-300mm VR is also at a very good price and gives an estimated 105-450mm on a DX camera like the D5200 ) are a good start to getting your feet wet in learning. Because in the end I don't think you should worry about getting lenses with very large apertures especially when stages are very well lit and the low-light ISO capability of the camera will be really good. Try renting lenses and testing them out to see if you need something better for example. Just wouldn't recommend spending unless you really need it and use it. Also don't forget to spend money on big SD cards to be able to shoot RAW pictures with it. The 32GB Sandisks that write at 45MB/s are very good and inexpensive.
    D800 with Meike MB-D12 (Robbed)
    AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G (Robbed)
    AF-S NIKKOR 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II (Robbed)
  • heartyfisherheartyfisher Posts: 3,181Member
    edited January 2013
    Thanks for the comments on my shots :-) gives me a bit more confidence :-) !
    Sorry no I dont have a flicker account .. but you can check out some old photos on deviantart. heartyfisher.deviantart.com Yeah, I need to get shooting again instead of just talking gear! sometimes RL gets in the way :-(

    I agree that a 35 F1.8 will be a nice part of his kit..

    And yes it was a real nightmare shooting at first .. not one turned out good.. I got so frustrated !

    WB was tough ! harsh lighting was tough.. the stage was too high.. always looking up at them. seriously even my 2.8 lenses was useless in many cases ( when the lights were turned off or really low and moody.. and I am sure a 1.8 would be only a little better.

    I needed to read heaps on technique and gear and work out lots of stuff myself as well..
    tried every auto setting .. Like i mentioned earlier .. going "manual every thing" mode was the best setting.
    Post edited by heartyfisher on
    Moments of Light - D610 D7K S5pro 70-200f4 18-200 150f2.8 12-24 18-70 35-70f2.8 : C&C very welcome!
    Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.

  • tc88tc88 Posts: 537Member
    edited January 2013
    I'm also of the opinion that in addition to the 35 or 50 f/1.8 prime lens, you should get the zoom kit lens too. The kit lens is heavily discounted as part of the kit and is quite good for walk around lens. The zoom is much easier for general usage (that's after all why they are packaged in a kit) and the tradeoffs between the two lens can also help you get a better understanding about aperture/shutter speed/DoF, and maybe even better appreciation of what the f/1.8 offers. Of course, I understand there is another school of thought that the best way to learn is to be thrown into fire which I equate to using a prime lens.
    Post edited by tc88 on
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