Is anybody shooting video with their dslr?

autofocusautofocus Posts: 625Member
edited December 2013 in Nikon DSLR cameras
I've been playing with video on my D800 and D4. Shot a short motivational video for my stepson and found I really like this new challenge. I'm experimenting with settings and lenses. I've learned audio is a challenge as well. I recently picked up a Cinevate shoulder rig and hope to use it next week. Just when I thought I was reaching saturation in camera gear along comes video. Now I have a whole new list of things I want for Christmas. So, is anyone else doing anything with video? If so, lets chat. Maybe we can share some links here on the forum to showcase what we've done and help each other out to make things better. Here's a list of the video/audio gear I'm working with. D800, D4, Sony UHF Wireless Lav mic. Tascam DR-40, Rode NTG-2 shotgun mic, Cinevate shoulder rig with Fotga follow focus and, I finally found a use for my Light works vary-ND filter. Works great for outdoor video. I would really like a monitor now but have no idea what to look for. So, lets get it going. And so admin knows, I did a search for similar topics before posting this.
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Comments

  • paulrpaulr Posts: 1,175Member
    Hi Autofocus, I know where you are coming from I am now using the D4 and sound is not one of its best things
    I bought the Tascan DR60 D which gives perfect sound recording However its a recorder only. You need a power mic Phantom power is best Plus good earphones, sadly like everything, once you start the ball rolling, you need very deep pockets, especially with Video, large memory cards fast computer and a good software, Plus all the numerous add ons Good luck.
    Camera, Lens and Tripod and a few other Bits
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
  • autofocusautofocus Posts: 625Member
    @Msmoto, thanks for the link. I'll post some video there soon.
    @paulr, I saw your post about the DR-60 and did look at that before buying the DR-40. At this point the DR-40 better suits my needs. I'm trying to put my video rig together now and reading everything I can find on audio. Results thus far have been good but I know it will get better.
  • DaveyJDaveyJ Posts: 880Member
    edited December 2013
    We won't buy a DSLR Nikon without video. The younger users I know use PRIMARILY video on their Nikons. The Nikon DSLR focus though is hardly autofocus on their DSLRs and we own a whole fleet of focus pullers, steadicams, etc. In comparison the little Nikon 1 AW 1 mirrorless CX format camera which we bought almost exclusively for underwater use does stay in focus beautifully. The amount of aftermarket gear required to shoot DSLR video is somewhat disgusting. Each newer Nikon has better video than the earlier cameras.

    The Nikon DF is widely downgraded by every salesperson I have ever talked with due to lack of video and intense price for what it is. We have also found that after market sound systems are SOMETIMES required but the onboard sound from the D90 to date all have a spectacular advantage in live sound that if it is right is a tremendous plus that still photos simply DO NOT HAVE. All the HYPE about a still preserving a slice of time apparently did not even think live audio. As a scientist and a farmer for almost all of 70 years I find that live sound adds much. We have YET to actually find a sound system that will handle every situation even well let alone really professional. Which is why the movies have so much sound gear and also frequently dub in sound recorded to fix what they tried to live record at the time the movie was made.

    Anyone who thinks video mode on DSLR cameras has become almost required to sell have not made much of a study of what age bracket photographers who use either still and video, still alone, etc. The younger the serious photographer is my experience is the higher the chance they use video a lot. I always encourage them to shoot stills too!
    Post edited by DaveyJ on
  • autofocusautofocus Posts: 625Member
    Any recommendations for a video monitor? I don't even know which are considered knockoffs.
  • redirectorredirector Posts: 9Member
    I am using d800 and d5200 for video, but also have. Canon XA10 and on specific projects with hard deadlines I find the dedicated video recorder to deliver what the client needs, and the dslrs as creative supplements. I love incorporating time lapses and interval shooting as part of a finished product, and will also incorporate flip and compact camera 1080p footage when needed. I use a Rode Stereo mic for the Canon, and the Nikon external mic for the dslrs. I agree, sound is crucial, and I try to pick up live music in the context of the event for the video. But for interviews and fast action, I have to admit a dedicated video recorder like the canon is better in the field. And it preserves my d800 for creative stills which i add in post, I am using a big iMac from 2013, a New Drobo for storage, and Final Cut 10 for editing, it's a lot to manage for a one man operation but it keeps me young!
  • autofocusautofocus Posts: 625Member
    @redirector, I know what you mean about being a one man show. It's difficult to keep all the cogs turning, two cameras recording video, lav mic into camera, and boom mic into the DR-40. I set one camera up on a tripod and the other on a shoulder rig. I'm using Adobe Premiere 10 for editing. I know it's dated and have been looking at new software. I would like to know what you think of Final Cut Pro.
  • paulrpaulr Posts: 1,175Member
    If you are a Mac user its great Best Value ever, Some of the add -ons like Motion give it a twist and a software called FX. Lots of help on the web, Just a matter of how much time have got to learn your craft.
    Camera, Lens and Tripod and a few other Bits
  • MikeGunterMikeGunter Posts: 543Member
    Hi all,

    I shoot video on the D7000 and D7100 for broadcast; the D7100 is a major improvement.

    If you record sound discretely and sweeten in post, you will have more control, but it also be more time consuming. You can just sync it up and lay out the track which it what I do when time is in a crunch or the budget is what it is. I have two Tascams, an 100 and 07 and use them a lot. On a general shoot with little fluctuation of should and a good limiter, you can lay a nice track and be good.

    I'm really curious to Paulr's report on the D60 R. I bet it's a winner.

    If you have an extra 0 at the end of your budget, hire a sound guy and really, really do it right. It's worth it and it shows at the end. Of course, getting a light guy, set guy, and so on, and so on... Production value means just that.

    I totally agree with Davey. Barnum was right - I didn't know that Japan got their marketing information from him.

    My best to all,

    Mike
  • Vipmediastar_JZVipmediastar_JZ Posts: 1,708Member
    i'll be doing a music video for my friend with the D800. While my d800 does a humming noise it does not matter for this occasion as the music will be added in post.

    I do "need" to get an external audio recoder. My parents 35th is coming up and I may be "asked" to do a video. I have the nikon mic but for this occasion it is not good.

    I was thinking of getting the zoom H4 or something cheaper like a microphone as I hardly do video.

    So to answer the topic : i hardly do video
  • ChasCSChasCS Posts: 309Member
    I wonder if I could plug the audio out of my Motif XF8, using the headphone jack out from the keyboard only,
    into the microphone in jack on the D800?? Probably not a bright move...

    No, I best record the music externally, from studio monitors to stereo mic...
    D800, AF-S NIKKOR 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR, B+W Clear MRC 77mm, AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR, Sigma DG UV 77mm,
    SB-910~WG-AS3, SB-50, ME-1, Lexar Professional 600x 64GB SDXC UHS-I 90MB/s* x2, 400x 32GB SDHC UHS-I 60MB/s* x1
    Vanguard ALTA PRO 263AT, GH-300T, SBH-250, SBH-100, PH-22 Panhead
    Lowepro S&F Deluxe Technical Belt and Harness ~ Pouch 60 AW 50 AW & 10, S&F Toploader 70 AW, Lens Case 11 x 26cm
    FE, NIKKOR 2-20mm f/1.8, OPTEX UV 52mm, Vivitar Zoom 285, Kodacolor VR 1000 CF 135-24 EXP DX 35mm, rePlay XD1080

  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,973Member
    edited December 2013
    While I don't shoot pro video, I have been shooting more since getting the D800. So far I've only been using the internal microphone, and using software to reduce the hiss. I have been thinking about getting an external, simply to get better sound. Since I don't shoot video for a living, I'm not really interested in using an external device and syncing sound in post. I generally record ambient noise rather than interviews or anything of that nature. If any of the more knowledgeable members here have any suggestions for mics between $90-150 that would be appreciated.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member
    In that price range, check out this one:

    http://www.rodemic.com/videomic

    Around $150 street price. Requires a regular 9V battery.

    They also have a new "VideoMic GO" which is simpler and less expensive ($99). Just plug-in and go… no switches or other adjustments to worry about, and it doesn't even require a battery. (It sources voltage from the mic-in jack on newer cameras with 2.5V mic power such as the D800).

    Of course the performance of the GO won't be as good as the regular VideoMic, but still better than the internal mic.

    I've used both the regular VideoMic and the step-up VideoMic Pro ($230). Both recommended.

    Unfortunately the D800's mic-in is also noisy, so you may still need to use software noise reduction even with an external mic.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,973Member
    @Ade thanks for those suggestions. One of the reasons I'm looking for an external is to get rid of handling noise, since I often shoot hand held or from a monopod. Minor hiss is something I can deal with, but the noise from handling the camera is harder to deal with.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • paulrpaulr Posts: 1,175Member
    Not sure this message is in the right place but here go's
    When using the D4 in video mode I have had two occasions when the rear glass of the lens as fogged up. I can only assume the slight difference in temperature as caused this or maybe when the D4 is in video mode a certain amount of heat is generated. I am talking about short periods not sustained use.Or maybe the heat from the user may be a factor,. anybody else had this minor problem.
    Camera, Lens and Tripod and a few other Bits
  • MikeGunterMikeGunter Posts: 543Member
    Hi all,

    @ paulr - likely ambient moisture. I used to just use cleaning cloth to gently rub off the fog.

    @ all, I generally record to a separate audio device an use the internal camera as a sync track in post. I use several microphones, mostly Audio Technicas. Getting a good recorder that has some 'mixing' capability is important so you might be able to 'limit' the audio to avoid clipping and sweeten the sound on location will be important in the long run. Getting it right the first time keeps you from having to fix again and again.

    What I really like about what I 'think' the Tascam 60 D 'may' offer is mixing the inputs and offering those outputs to the camera's inputs.

    If so, that would be terrific. Basically offering one the opportunity to get a mix of the sound, with a 'top' (preventing the sound from clipping), mixing two channels from two microphones - probably), then funneling those inputs into a stereo input of a camera - while someone could 'ride the pots' if they so desired - likely an unnecessary option. I'm interested in Paul's feedback.

    It might even offer dual outputs to both camera and recording device.

    My best to all,

    Mike
  • WestEndBoyWestEndBoy Posts: 1,456Member
    I often shoot video with my D800 and 14-24 2.8. I record myself holding mock interviews with people and use it as a way to provide feedback to them. I spend a fair amount of time helping people in my networks find jobs, even though my day job is overseeing accounting and tax for a medium sized real estate company.
  • redirectorredirector Posts: 9Member
    @redirector, I know what you mean about being a one man show. It's difficult to keep all the cogs turning, two cameras recording video, lav mic into camera, and boom mic into the DR-40. I set one camera up on a tripod and the other on a shoulder rig. I'm using Adobe Premiere 10 for editing. I know it's dated and have been looking at new software. I would like to know what you think of Final Cut Pro.
    Final Cut 10 has a setup that is easy for long time mac users to pick up, become competent and get good results quickly, and enough capability to support real video editors (which I am not). I leaned to do picture in picture, time delayed and targeted audio and video editing, easy slo mo (which again, on my client budgets saves me from having to film in 60fps and switch back and forth which invariably costs me time -- juggling too many settings is risky on the job, better to do in post). I have added music, detached audio from recorded clips, added stills and other footage, etc... I've even done three camera interview setup and managed all synced clips in post with relative ease, so props for FCP there. I have nothing to compare Final Cut with other than iMovie, and it's a big step up.

    I should do more with lav mics like you. Or get a shotgun mic on camera. I do have a zoom h4 and it's fantastic sound recorder, so for better live music that I am using as a sound track it's great.
  • redirectorredirector Posts: 9Member
    @Jschickele I am sure that amazing lens works well for your setup! My lenses: 24m f1.4 for the D800 makes for luscious creative results at night and is good for interviews allowing wide context behind the subject and ensures you get close enough for on camera mics. For DX I just picked up the Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 II which will suit interior and low angle positions. Ironically as much as I like the Canon XA10 I have not invested in a second lens/converter for wider angles.

    @PB_PM re: handling noise. Have you tried The Nikon shoe mount mic, MC-1 I think? Should help in many instances.
  • autofocusautofocus Posts: 625Member
    I have the MC-1 and while the quality is good it still reveals handling noise. It has a hard plastic shoe mount that doesn't isolate the mic. Picks up any fumbling with the camera unless you are very careful.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,973Member
    @redirector the Nikon mic seems rather pricy for an entry level device.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • ChasCSChasCS Posts: 309Member
    It would be better, if there were a small rubber, leather or even clothe washer included, where that MC-1 shoe mount, tightens down to the camera. Even a sliver of construction paper placed in there, could help separate them and give the mic some protection of those vibrations and unwanted noises from being picked up, in our video recording.
    The sponge foam wind sock works well enough...

    Volume always has to be turned down when handling live mic's , especially while wearing headphones. ;-)
    Learned that, the hardest way possible, setting up the Vocoder On my Motif XF8!! Ouch!!
    D800, AF-S NIKKOR 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR, B+W Clear MRC 77mm, AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR, Sigma DG UV 77mm,
    SB-910~WG-AS3, SB-50, ME-1, Lexar Professional 600x 64GB SDXC UHS-I 90MB/s* x2, 400x 32GB SDHC UHS-I 60MB/s* x1
    Vanguard ALTA PRO 263AT, GH-300T, SBH-250, SBH-100, PH-22 Panhead
    Lowepro S&F Deluxe Technical Belt and Harness ~ Pouch 60 AW 50 AW & 10, S&F Toploader 70 AW, Lens Case 11 x 26cm
    FE, NIKKOR 2-20mm f/1.8, OPTEX UV 52mm, Vivitar Zoom 285, Kodacolor VR 1000 CF 135-24 EXP DX 35mm, rePlay XD1080

  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member
    Yup that's why the new VideoMic comes with the Rycote Lyre suspension system, which helps isolates the mic from camera handling noises (my old one had finicky "rubber bands" instead). Add a 'dead cat' for wind protection and you have a pretty decent low-cost mic.
  • ChasCSChasCS Posts: 309Member
    Thanks @Ade.
    While the suspension system looks very effective, this unit does require a battery.
    And it looks very bulky, but if it works well...

    http://www.rodemic.com/videomic/


    For my relatively few uses, the Me-1 will suffice.
    I will figure out an appropriate thin leather spacer/washer...

    D800, AF-S NIKKOR 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR, B+W Clear MRC 77mm, AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR, Sigma DG UV 77mm,
    SB-910~WG-AS3, SB-50, ME-1, Lexar Professional 600x 64GB SDXC UHS-I 90MB/s* x2, 400x 32GB SDHC UHS-I 60MB/s* x1
    Vanguard ALTA PRO 263AT, GH-300T, SBH-250, SBH-100, PH-22 Panhead
    Lowepro S&F Deluxe Technical Belt and Harness ~ Pouch 60 AW 50 AW & 10, S&F Toploader 70 AW, Lens Case 11 x 26cm
    FE, NIKKOR 2-20mm f/1.8, OPTEX UV 52mm, Vivitar Zoom 285, Kodacolor VR 1000 CF 135-24 EXP DX 35mm, rePlay XD1080

  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member
    As mentioned a few posts above there is the smaller "GO" version ($99) of the VideoMic which doesn't require a battery but has the same Rycote suspension mechanism.

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