How to get Sharp Images by Moose Peterson

Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
edited January 2014 in General Discussions
Over the years many topics have arised regrading sharpness; more specifically, getting a sharp image. However, many of our conversations have leaned toward lenses...and for good reasons. Yet, we can all agree that even with the best lens, proper technique plays a vital part of getting the image as well. With that in mind, Mr. Moose Peterson has started a "Sharpness Series" to address this. As he uploads his video on YouTube, I will provide the links for us to look upon.

Here are the first two:

Sharpness Series #1 - Handholding -- Direct Link




Sharpness Series #2 Panning -- Direct Link

Post edited by Golf007sd on
D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
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Comments

  • Thank you Golf, very useful.
    Those who say it can't be done, should not interrupt those doing it!
  • WestEndBoyWestEndBoy Posts: 1,456Member
    Thanks Golf, I know what I have been doing wrong now. I need to look through the square glass end, not the round glass end!
  • YetibuddhaYetibuddha Posts: 388Member
    Thanks Golf, these are and will be very useful.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    Panning…I think Moose does this well, but I would offer in addition, I will lock my elbows in at my sides if possible and then the rotation at the hips moves a very solid unit of head, camera, arms, chest, all locked together. This works well with objects moving on a relatively flat plane, i.e., cars, etc., on track.
    Msmoto, mod
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,025Member
    This is a useful video too.

    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • SymphoticSymphotic Posts: 607Member
    If I need to hand hold in portrait mode, I get much sharper pictures if my right hand is DOWN and my elbows locked against my side than if my right hand is up with my elbow sticking out in the classic photographer mode.
    Jack Roberts
    "Discovery consists in seeing what everyone else has seen and thinking what nobody else has thought"--Albert Szent-Gyorgy
  • kanuckkanuck Posts: 1,291Member
    Always been a big fan of Moose's nature work. With regards to panning, I like the panning plates that Really Right Stuff offers that allow for simple, smooth camera movement on a ball-head. They also offer some great panorama setups as well, which help your technique for taking the proper overlap of frames to be stacked later in post-processing. The only downside is the price of course, but you are getting high quality, effective products as well.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    There are many techniques we use to keep the camera from moving during exposure. (Moving=in relationship to the object). I remember handholding a 300mm f/4.5 Nikkor on an F body at 1/15 second wide open. Used a tree to wedge the camera into the bark and create a stable base. And, it is the stable base we are all after.

    In panning, often the object we are attempting to capture is moving at an angle to the horizon which means we have to be going up or down with the camera angle in addition to right and left. This works best with long lenses with a monopod or gimbal head, although some folks like to hand hold the very long lenses, i.e., for BIF where the angle of flight may be a bit unpredictable.

    The key to all of this is for an individual to develop a technique which allows the camera to set itself, i.e., focus and predictive focus tracking, exposure, then shoot the burst, hoping we have captured one image which is a keeper. And, as pointed out by Moose, it is in some ways like swinging a golf club, one keeps the pan going after stopping the exposure burst. In shooting vehicles, I usually lock on to the object, and as it comes into the frame I want, shoot the burst, following it even as it may overflow the frame.
    Msmoto, mod
  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    @kanuck: +1 on the RRS Panning Clam. What I ended up getting.
    @Msmoto: Very informative....Thank you.
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • mikepmikep Posts: 280Member
    i have a handgrip attached at all times to my d700, and while i dont always slip my hand inside it if i am not taking more than a couple of snaps, its really great for assisting stabilisation. it transfers half the weight to the back of the right hand rather than just have it taken by the fingers of the right hand. it can be especially helpful shooting portrait when you dont have a sidegrip

    i didnt realise it how good it was until the time i did a days shoot without it; the pain i had on the palm-side of my fingers at the end of it showed me just how much i was using it to take the weight of the camera. of course, i re-attached it after this and it has not left my camera since

    it makes a great carry handle too, as i never use a strap

    i am sure there are many good ones around, but the one i use is from camdapter
  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    @mikep: Can you provide us with a link to the product and does the company make one that works for the full bodies like the D3's or D4's or those that have a battery grip?
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • mikepmikep Posts: 280Member
    edited January 2014
    this is the place : http://www.camdapter.com/home.html

    i bought the hand strap and the shoulder strap, the shoulder strap is also good (well made etc) but i never use it
    Post edited by mikep on
  • PhotobugPhotobug Posts: 4,520Member
    Thanks for posting the link mikep. I have never seen camdapter straps before. I am not interested in the hand strap but am in the shoulder strap/sling configuration.

    I don't like the secure point being the tripod socket on the base of the camera. When RSS came out with using a plate on the bottom and one of the eyelets, I liked that approach. Now I have an option. Thanks.
    D750 & D7100 | 24-70 F2.8 G AF-S ED, 70-200 F2.8 AF VR, TC-14E III, TC-1.7EII, 35 F2 AF D, 50mm F1.8G, 105mm G AF-S VR | Backup & Wife's Gear: D5500 & Sony HX50V | 18-140 AF-S ED VR DX, 55-300 AF-S G VR DX |
    |SB-800, Amaran Halo LED Ring light | MB-D16 grip| Gitzo GT3541 + RRS BH-55LR, Gitzo GM2942 + Sirui L-10 | RRS gear | Lowepro, ThinkTank, & Hoodman gear | BosStrap | Vello Freewave Plus wireless Remote, Leica Lens Cleaning Cloth |
  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    edited January 2014
    Video Number 3

    Sharpness Series Basic #3 Long Lens -- Direct Link

    Post edited by Golf007sd on
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    @PitchBlack: +1 on all the recommendation. If I may, I would like to add to one item to the list.

    6. Consider using a tripod to lessen (eliminate) any blurs and assist in focusing.
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • SquamishPhotoSquamishPhoto Posts: 608Member
    Remember, with 36mp you will probably notice shake more than with 12.
    My minimum shutter speed changed not one iota when I switched from the D700 to the D800. I don't see how you can believe this popular misconception.
    2. NEVER, EVER, EVER focus and recompose. Ever. Use the closest spot. If it's not in the frame, you have 36mp so you'll be able to crop.
    Spend some more time shooting with a manual focus lens and you may change your tune. :)
    Mike
    D3 • D750 • 14-24mm f2.8 • 35mm f1.4A • PC-E 45mm f2.8 • 50mm f1.8G • AF-D 85mm f1.4 • ZF.2 100mm f2 • 200mm f2 VR2
  • WestEndBoyWestEndBoy Posts: 1,456Member
    Remember, with 36mp you will probably notice shake more than with 12.
    My minimum shutter speed changed not one iota when I switched from the D700 to the D800. I don't see how you can believe this popular misconception.
    2. NEVER, EVER, EVER focus and recompose. Ever. Use the closest spot. If it's not in the frame, you have 36mp so you'll be able to crop.
    Spend some more time shooting with a manual focus lens and you may change your tune. :)
    Regarding shutter speed, all things being equal you will need to increase shutter speed with higher resolution. These are just two of the variables in the equation. Hold the others constant, if pixels double shutter speed will need to increase the square root of of 2. Not saying you didn't increase shutter speed, but there is probably another factor at play. For example, maybe your shutter speed was plenty fast to begin with.
  • SquamishPhotoSquamishPhoto Posts: 608Member
    Nope. It was my minimum hand held speed and it hasn't changed one bit. Ill switch back to the D3 and nothing changes. I think you're fooling yourself, sorry. :)
    Mike
    D3 • D750 • 14-24mm f2.8 • 35mm f1.4A • PC-E 45mm f2.8 • 50mm f1.8G • AF-D 85mm f1.4 • ZF.2 100mm f2 • 200mm f2 VR2
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,141Member
    I am with SquamishPhoto on this. I too have not noticed a need to increase minimum hand holdable shutter speed with my D800.
  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member
    You guys are likely all correct.

    From a whole-image perspective, there is no need to increase minimum speed when hand-holding a D800. If your technique is good enough to take sharp pictures with a D700/D3, then the same technique is also good enough to take sharp pictures with a D800.

    But at a pixel-level perspective, @jshickele is right that the increased pixel density of the D800 places more demand on technique. Slight motion blur not visible on a D700 (at a pixel level) might indeed become visible on the D800 when pixel-peeping.

    Increasing the shutter speed is one way to address the issue. Not pixel-peeping is another way to address the issue.
  • WestEndBoyWestEndBoy Posts: 1,456Member
    It is just a matter of how far the camera moves when the shutter is open. If you have a solid technique, it is likely a smaller distance, but it will still be a distance. If that distance (actually it is an angle) is the same as one pixel on a 9 megapixel camera, then you will notice it on a higher megapixel camera because the pixels are smaller.

    However, you need to be a pixel peeper to see that. I doubt that many notice in real life.
  • FreezeActionFreezeAction Posts: 688Member
    I'll have to look for it but Nikon posted on their website that using live view will focus better than looking through the view finder on the D800 bodies. It's and indoor shot that they show the diff on.

    See page 6 here. I'm wondering if slow methodical landscapes will be better with a D610 shot with live view also?

    http://cdn-4.nikon-cdn.com/en_US/o/Y6wrkA9OU_z04IreazIXl_22UII/PDF/D800_TechnicalGuide_En.pdf

    I seldom shoot handheld now. Shaking is not good. Monopods for panning action and tripods with remote releases for still life and landscapes save my day. I will pan action from a monopod. 95% or more of my Rodeo, equestrian, aerial, and stunt biker photos were taken from a monopod with appropriately fast shutter speed.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    Sharp images... Lots of personal preference here. And different techniques for holding the camera steady. My contribution today.... With people of all ages, if they are reasonably still, 1/160 sec with lenses up to 200 mm (VR on). What I have found is this tends to stop most subject motion if the subject understands they need to be still for the photo.

    With very slow speeds...longer than 1/30 second....do you breath in, out, or hold your breath?
    Msmoto, mod
  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member
    edited January 2014

    With very slow speeds...longer than 1/30 second....do you breath in, out, or hold your breath?
    I've been holding my breath, which apparently is the wrong way. The natural pause between breaths is supposedly when we're most stable.
    Post edited by Ade on
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,025Member
    edited January 2014
    I noticed I got away with sharp images with slower shutter speeds on the D40 but not anymore with the D7000. But the increase in ISO performance with the better AF system helps me a lot, so I don't mind bumping up ISO.
    Post edited by NSXTypeR on
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
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