How to get Sharp Images by Moose Peterson

2

Comments

  • WestEndBoyWestEndBoy Posts: 1,456Member
    I used to have the same issue when I was a competitive rifle shooter. A key technique is relaxing your breathing and getting your heartrate down. Don't try to control anything actively except by:

    -relaxing
    -synchronize your breathing with your heart. You want the time between the inhale and exhale to be between heartbeats

    SLOWLY amd GENTLY pull the trigger. Once you get to know your trigger pull, you can time it so that the shot is between breaths/heartbeat as above.

    I used to consistently get single hole groups at 100 yards offhand and nail 6 inch gongs at 1,000 yards prone with this technique. I used to think I was good until I met a US Navy Seal that nailed the 6 inch gong offhand.

    Cameras, guns....same principle applies.
  • SquamishPhotoSquamishPhoto Posts: 608Member
    Nice tips, jshickele.
    Mike
    D3 • D750 • 14-24mm f2.8 • 35mm f1.4A • PC-E 45mm f2.8 • 50mm f1.8G • AF-D 85mm f1.4 • ZF.2 100mm f2 • 200mm f2 VR2
  • sidewayssideways Posts: 54Member
    edited January 2014
    @jshickele
    +1
    Relaxing during the outbreath you can feel your heart slow, take the shot at the end before it begins to speed up again and you feel the need to draw breath.

    The "surprise break" can help too. Don't jab the shutter button, just squeeze progressively harder and let the exact moment of the click come as a surprise. It doesn't have to take long.
    Post edited by sideways on
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,451Moderator
    edited January 2014
    Guys - you can't really compare the soggy movement of a shutter button with the glass rod 'snap' of a quality trigger, c'mon now, getting carried away here... 8-|

    My name gives away my past in competitive shooting too.

    Post edited by spraynpray on
    Always learning.
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,403Member
    edited January 2014
    breath control for slow shutter speeds. I use the technique used by benchrest shooters: inhale to fill lungs, exhale one third, shoot and then exhale the rest of the way. I will never get to the point where I even know when my heart is between beats, much less think of that when trying to capture a moment; but I can be conscious of my breathing and if you have ever looked at a target through a high powered rifle scope you would be amazed at how much movement breathing causes.
    Post edited by donaldejose on
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    Firing the shutter at slow speeds….I let out my breath about to half way and almost crush the camera squeezing slowly.
    Msmoto, mod
  • ThomasHortonThomasHorton Posts: 323Member

    3. Get that film speed up. I generally want over double the focal length, and triple if possible. I'll trade a stop of ISO for a stop of speed.
    5. Hold the camera very tightly.
    I am stubbing my eye on these two.

    I probably don't understand #3. I always thought you adjust ISO last and in effect you change ISO in order to keep the shutter speed/aperture you desire. Am I mis-reading #3 in that it almost sounds like you are adjusting ISO first?


    But I am pretty sure I understand #5, I just disagree. Perhaps it is the phrase "very tightly". When I hold something "very tightly" I am under more physical stress. I think it is more correct to say that you need to hold your camera firmly.

    Like some of the other posters have written, there are coorelations between shooting with a camera and shooting with a gun. In both instances you want to keep the "equipment" steady at the critical moment.

    Holding a gun "very tightly" is not condusive for accuracy.
    Gear: Camera obscura with an optical device which transmits and refracts light.
  • WestEndBoyWestEndBoy Posts: 1,456Member
    Perhaps hold "firmly" or "snugly".
  • SquamishPhotoSquamishPhoto Posts: 608Member
    For me, the camera is resting in my hands and my arms and body are bracing for stability. Its the same rule I learned playing pool, to never grip but to always let the cut rest on your fingers so that your stroke is fluid, and fluidity is the secret to a good "leave" or having the cue ball go where you want it to after the ball is pocketed.

    Its worth noting that I learned this rule from a guy who had no thumb on that hand, which meant he had no other option but to hold the cue that way. :)
    Mike
    D3 • D750 • 14-24mm f2.8 • 35mm f1.4A • PC-E 45mm f2.8 • 50mm f1.8G • AF-D 85mm f1.4 • ZF.2 100mm f2 • 200mm f2 VR2
  • ThomasHortonThomasHorton Posts: 323Member
    @ThomasHorton: Yes I will adjust shutter speed before ISO unless I'm dropping below about 1/200.
    Thanks, that makes more sense to me and I follow that myself.

    Gear: Camera obscura with an optical device which transmits and refracts light.
  • blandbland Posts: 812Member
    edited February 2014
    Firing the shutter at slow speeds….I let out my breath about to half way and almost crush the camera squeezing slowly.
    I do the same thing, let out my breath when shooting and not holding my breath. I also take (4) 200mg Advil before shooting a concert.

    That said, I've become extremely frustrated because I'm not getting the clarity and sharpness by equipment is capable of. I know some of my problem is my age but I'm searching for a fix and hopefully I'll figure out something this year.

    Post edited by bland on
  • ben_dmbben_dmb Posts: 87Member
    edited February 2014
    Bland - are you joking when you say that you take Advil or there really is some rationale behind this?
    Post edited by ben_dmb on
  • blandbland Posts: 812Member
    Bland - are joking when you say that you take Advil or there really is some rationale behind this?
    Not joking at all, it calms and relaxes me. Think about it, a 60 year old man driving two hours to get to the concert, then carry my equipment across the parking plot into the building to get my media pass (sometimes a 1/4 mile away), then haul my equipment again to the concert area, having to meet and deal with people all the way. Then comes dealing with security, fans and etc. Finally I make my way to the pit to shoot, get all my gear out and ready, and my heart's pumping 100mph. Then I pop 4 Advil, eat a granola bar, load up on water and in 15 minutes I'm kit complete and ready to shoot!
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    OK, the age card has been played…. and some of us have developed some tremors in our more mature years. Interestingly enough, if one looks at me in the photos from last years get together in Colorado, it is clear I am not in great physical shape. However, I am now in the fitness center four times a week, have found some eating behaviors which are not so much as feeding my face as nurturing my body, and should be in much better condition for the summer shooting venues…. carrying the 35 lb backpack up and down three flights of stairs at certain racetracks.

    Thus, I do think it is helpful to be in reasonable physical fitness so as to be able to handle the camera, etc., with more ease, and hopefully with more steadiness in holding the camera.

    One other technique is to use the shutter delay timer, 1 or 2 seconds, push the shutter and relax, allowing everything to settle as the shutter curtain makes the exposure. Very useful on the tripod, but also can be helpful when holding the camera against a support.
    Msmoto, mod
  • ben_dmbben_dmb Posts: 87Member
    Ok, I see I've got disqualified on my question to Bland. Twice. If I offended anybody please forgive me.
  • ThomasHortonThomasHorton Posts: 323Member

    One other technique is to use the shutter delay timer, 1 or 2 seconds, push the shutter and relax, allowing everything to settle as the shutter curtain makes the exposure. Very useful on the tripod, but also can be helpful when holding the camera against a support.
    I never thought about using the timer while handholding the camera. Thanks for sharing that tip.
    Gear: Camera obscura with an optical device which transmits and refracts light.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,451Moderator
    Advil - aren't they Ibuprofen anti-inflammatory tablets? WOW Bland - I value my liver over a sharp snapshot any day.... :O
    Always learning.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,451Member
    4 in one hour does seem excessive. Even the Advil bottle advices against exceeding 2 every 2 hours, with 6 being the maximum every 24 hours.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    OK, guys, this is not a medical forum, but if someone wants a reference for the dosage of a medication, send me a PM.
    Msmoto, mod
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,451Member
    What? My doctor told me photography would solve all my health problems... =))
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    My Dr said you could take double the recommend dose without any ill effect. It's really a dosage over time (think years) that will do any damage. How do you think your liver likes a shot of liquor? 6 Advil in 24 hours is way less impactful than a few drinks. YMMV of course ;-)
  • ThomasHortonThomasHorton Posts: 323Member
    I guess we can debate the health risks of taking advil. But my question is how does taking advil in any dosage improve photography?
    Gear: Camera obscura with an optical device which transmits and refracts light.
  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    Taking away pain and inflammation improves many aspects of one's abilities, I would think. Personally I prefer a few drinks to reduce the pain =P~
  • PhotobugPhotobug Posts: 5,586Member
    I guess we can debate the health risks of taking advil. But my question is how does taking advil in any dosage improve photography?
    It doesn't. Some people look for any excuse to take Advil. LoL. Just pull those elbos into the body, blow out your breath and squeeze, not mash that shutter button.
    D750 & D7100 | 24-70 F2.8 G AF-S ED, 70-200 F2.8 AF VR, TC-14E III, TC-1.7EII, 35 F2 AF D, 50mm F1.8G, 105mm G AF-S VR | Backup & Wife's Gear: D5500 & Sony HX50V | 18-140 AF-S ED VR DX, 55-300 AF-S G VR DX |
    |SB-800, Amaran Halo LED Ring light | MB-D16 grip| Gitzo GT3541 + RRS BH-55LR, Gitzo GM2942 + Sirui L-10 | RRS gear | Lowepro, ThinkTank, & Hoodman gear | BosStrap | Vello Freewave Plus wireless Remote, Leica Lens Cleaning Cloth |
  • haroldpharoldp Posts: 984Member
    I have been following this thread, while most of the advice given about steady hold is good, in my experience, many of the situations i which I am making shutter speed / ISO compromises involve subjects that move, and shutter speed (possibly panning) is the only solution. Neither hold technique, support, nor VR will help with subject motion.

    ... H
    D810, D3x, 14-24/2.8, 50/1.4D, 24-70/2.8, 24-120/4 VR, 70-200/2.8 VR1, 80-400 G, 200-400/4 VR1, 400/2.8 ED VR G, 105/2 DC, 17-55/2.8.
    Nikon N90s, F100, F, lots of Leica M digital and film stuff.

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