When do use those cumbersome three legged things

sevencrossingsevencrossing Posts: 2,800Member
edited December 2014 in General Discussions
This not about which one you use
just when do you use them
If any one want to talk about one legged things; please feel to start a new thread
Post edited by sevencrossing on
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Comments

  • sevencrossingsevencrossing Posts: 2,800Member
    edited December 2014
    I admit I do use one
    1 anything requiring multiple exposures
    2 panos
    3 long exposures at night
    4 when using a 10 stop ND filter
    5 working tethered
    6 shooting at sunrise or sunset with the 80 -400

    but otherwise I hate them, they cramp your style and are IMHO a hinderance to capturing the decisive moment

    Post edited by sevencrossing on
  • MikeGunterMikeGunter Posts: 543Member
    Hi all,

    Your list is very good, but I use mine every time I have the opportunity.

    Not necessarily the answer you or anyone might have asked for, but the answer I'll stick by. Making sharp images starts with stable supports.

    Some of us are less 'stable' than others.

    My best,

    Mike
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,199Member
    I am like Mike. I use a tripod whenever I can without too much inconvenience. I even sit in a chair behind a tripod when shooting portraits for a long time (bad back - hurts to bend over a long time). Out in the woods shooting landscapes I will often lean up against a tree or rest my hands on a log or stone. Tripods are our friends, not our enemies. If you can work without one, good for you; but not all people can.
  • haroldpharoldp Posts: 984Member
    All of the above reasons, and for long lenses.
    D810, D3x, 14-24/2.8, 50/1.4D, 24-70/2.8, 24-120/4 VR, 70-200/2.8 VR1, 80-400 G, 200-400/4 VR1, 400/2.8 ED VR G, 105/2 DC, 17-55/2.8.
    Nikon N90s, F100, F, lots of Leica M digital and film stuff.

  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    edited December 2014
    I have no regrets whenever I need to use my tripod or when I take it with me on a shoot. Moreover, If you have the right one its transportation is not a big deal.

    For HDR photography my tripod is an invaluable tool. I challenge any photographer, with the best hand holding technique to try the way I do it.

    For big glass, a tripod or monopod is a must; in order to have a long day of joyful shooting.

    I must say, for those that have full-size tripods that has the thickness of a my middle finger, then you are better off not having one.
    Post edited by Golf007sd on
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • heartyfisherheartyfisher Posts: 3,172Member
    edited December 2014
    My main tripod is a small light one attached to my camera all the time. it helps stabilise the shot just by its presence and when I need a bit of extra stability I brace it against my belt. I hardly use it as a standard tripod ..ie. on the ground, but its there if I need to. I use it to get my camera up in the air or out over ledges for interesting views.
    Post edited by heartyfisher on
    Moments of Light - D610 D7K S5pro 70-200f4 18-200 150f2.8 12-24 18-70 35-70f2.8 : C&C very welcome!
    Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.

  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,093Member
    edited December 2014
    I don't use it as I don't own one. Easy.

    Would it improve my photography? Probably.

    I'm just too lazy to carry one, and too poor to buy a good one.
    Post edited by NSXTypeR on
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • PhotobugPhotobug Posts: 4,605Member
    Sevencrossing...agree with our list for when I use a tripod.
    In addition, I use my tripod when I am shooting creeks and rivers so I can slow down that shutter to get that smooth cotton like water. I use a tripod for taking pictures of fireworks. Also use a tripod to get those early morning and late evening sunrise/sunset pictures. Any long lens work or BIF require a solid tripod - none of that thin leg stuff. No And most important, I use a tripod when shooting 3 and 4 generation pictures. I need to be in those pictures.

    My daughter-in-law puts together scrap books and 80% of the photos are mine. :D Over the years she has noticed that I am not in too many of the pictures so she is grabbing my camera to take pictures so I am in more of them with her children.

    Finally, yes I agree with the comments that tripods can slow you down or be inconvenient. You got to balance the pros and cons.
    D750 & D7100 | 24-70 F2.8 G AF-S ED, 70-200 F2.8 AF VR, TC-14E III, TC-1.7EII, 35 F2 AF D, 50mm F1.8G, 105mm G AF-S VR | Backup & Wife's Gear: D5500 & Sony HX50V | 18-140 AF-S ED VR DX, 55-300 AF-S G VR DX |
    |SB-800, Amaran Halo LED Ring light | MB-D16 grip| Gitzo GT3541 + RRS BH-55LR, Gitzo GM2942 + Sirui L-10 | RRS gear | Lowepro, ThinkTank, & Hoodman gear | BosStrap | Vello Freewave Plus wireless Remote, Leica Lens Cleaning Cloth |
  • tcole1983tcole1983 Posts: 981Member
    Very few times do I use one.

    Long exposures. Portraits that I am in. That about sums it up. Otherwise handheld or on the monopod.
    D5200, D5000, S31, 18-55 VR, 17-55 F2.8, 35 F1.8G, 105 F2.8 VR, 300 F4 AF-S (Previously owned 18-200 VRI, Tokina 12-24 F4 II)
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 845Member
    I am just about to buy one and plan to use it as often as I can for long tele shots. Is there ever a reason not to use one if you have the option?
  • KnockKnockKnockKnock Posts: 372Member
    I think there are arguments to be made for the freedom of not shooting with a tripod. But I'll leave that to KR.

    I use it primarily for product shots, for when I have time to manipulate the composition obsessively and for when I want to be in the picture.
    D7100, D60, 35mm f/1.8 DX, 50mm f/1.4, 18-105mm DX, 18-55mm VR II, Sony RX-100 ii
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,089Moderator
    +1 @MikeGunter - every time I can. I only don't when I can't.
    Always learning.
  • sevencrossingsevencrossing Posts: 2,800Member
    edited December 2014
    I am just about to buy one and plan to use it as often as I can for long tele shots. Is there ever a reason not to use one if you have the option?
    It depends on what you are shooting , if it it static no reason not to use one
    if it is moving, then you really need a gimbal head
    Post edited by sevencrossing on
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    Studio...once a set is completed, camera position is confirmed, put the box on sticks.
    Location....same as above if a set is constructed.
    Studio live action.....not used
    Studio, available light, slow shutter speed...sometimes.
    Location... long lens, fixed camera position....used for the purpose of allowing me to relax between events and not set the camera on the ground. Gimbal usually...
    Interiors....almost always to allow subtle camera changes as the "proof" is examined.
    Macro....varies
    Focus stacking....always
    Camera testing, i.e., AF Fine Tune...of course
    Msmoto, mod
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,093Member
    I am just about to buy one and plan to use it as often as I can for long tele shots. Is there ever a reason not to use one if you have the option?
    I am just about to buy one and plan to use it as often as I can for long tele shots. Is there ever a reason not to use one if you have the option?
    It depends on what you are shooting , if it it static no reason not to use one
    if it is moving, then you really need a gimbal head
    I think with macro photography of live bugs (not posed ones) it might be hard to us a full sized tripod. I can see a beanbag helping though for the low shots, but I've never attempted it or owned a bean bag. Maybe a smaller, squatter tripod may help.

    Does anyone else use a tripod for bug macros?
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,006Member
    I have used a tripod for insect photography, but if the little things are active it's no easy task. Of course the best time to photograph insects is in the morning, when it is cold, so that they are less active. Sharper images are often the result.

    I use a tripod often, because it's not that big a deal to carry it around. A good light weight carbon fibre tripod is worth it's weight in gold, more so actually. ;) I use it for just about every type of photography, from wildlife to family portraits. Now I don't use it all the time, such as causal outings, but for most serious work I have it with me.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • ThomasHortonThomasHorton Posts: 323Member
    For me, using a tripod (and those one leggy things) is my norm. I take a different attitude: I always use a tripod unless there is a reason not to.

    But then my type of photography lends it self nicely to the use of a tripod.
    Gear: Camera obscura with an optical device which transmits and refracts light.
  • Nikonsince1974Nikonsince1974 Posts: 78Member
    A tripod, or a monopod at least is an absolute must with my 600nn f/4 AIS "Beast". Also use it when I am using my 300mm f/2.8 AIS when doing portraiture work or stuff that requires a shutter speed of 1/200±. Of course anything requires precise registration like HDR, I also use it a lot with Real Estate photography when doing a panorama or night time images
    Nikon F2S w/ MD-2, FE-2 w/ MD-12, Nikkormat FT3, Nikonos V, F4S, D700

    16mm f/2.8 Fisheye AIS, 18mm f/3.5 AIS, 24mm f/2.8 AIS, 28mm f/2.8 AI, 28mm f/3.5 and 35mm f/2.8 UW-Nikkors, 35mm f/2.8 AIS, 50mm f/1.4 non-AI (AI’d), 55mm f/2.8 AIS Micro w/ PK-13, 85mm f/1.4 AIS, 80-200 f/4 AIS, 105mm f/1.8 AIS, 180mm f/2.8 ED AIS, 300mm f/2.8 ED-IF AIS, 600mm f/4 ED-IF AIS, TC14B and TC300.

    Hasselblad 500CM with PM90 prism finder and A12/A16 backs, 40mm f/4 CF, 60mm f/3.5 CF, 80mm f/2.8 C, 150mm f/4 C and 250mm f/5.6 C lenses
  • MikeGunterMikeGunter Posts: 543Member
    Hi all,

    @NSXTypeR - taking great macro shots is when you'll want to use a tripod; granted, it's not convenient, but then taking great shots sometimes isn't.

    In my post I articulated that I use a tripod every time I could. That implies that I can't every time and that I wish I could every time - both true (excepting the motions blur shots).

    There are many, too many times that the tripod doesn't work or isn't allowed - a pity.

    My best,

    Mike
  • sevencrossingsevencrossing Posts: 2,800Member
    Thanks Guys lots of great replies

    Two distinct camps

    1 use a tripod only when you can't hand hold

    2 hand hold only when you can't use a tripod



  • haroldpharoldp Posts: 984Member
    When shooting BIF, I will often have a 400/2.8 w tv-20eiii on a tripod (see 3 giro with rrs gimbal head) and an 80-400g on a neck strap for handheld when they get close or fly overhead where even a gimbal cannot reach.

    For landscapes I use a tripod whenever it is feasible, since being able to stop down to optimum and use low ISO is a greater difference than between lenses.

    It is also essential for registration of HDR s and panos

    ... H
    D810, D3x, 14-24/2.8, 50/1.4D, 24-70/2.8, 24-120/4 VR, 70-200/2.8 VR1, 80-400 G, 200-400/4 VR1, 400/2.8 ED VR G, 105/2 DC, 17-55/2.8.
    Nikon N90s, F100, F, lots of Leica M digital and film stuff.

  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,093Member
    edited December 2014
    Hi all,

    @NSXTypeR - taking great macro shots is when you'll want to use a tripod; granted, it's not convenient, but then taking great shots sometimes isn't.

    In my post I articulated that I use a tripod every time I could. That implies that I can't every time and that I wish I could every time - both true (excepting the motions blur shots).

    There are many, too many times that the tripod doesn't work or isn't allowed - a pity.

    My best,

    Mike
    Right, I'm not saying that tripods have no place in macro photography, I'm just saying it might limit your movement when you have bugs flying around. It won't be easy but I'm sure your photos would definitely come out better.

    For focus stacking it'd be pretty much essential.
    I have used a tripod for insect photography, but if the little things are active it's no easy task. Of course the best time to photograph insects is in the morning, when it is cold, so that they are less active. Sharper images are often the result.

    I use a tripod often, because it's not that big a deal to carry it around. A good light weight carbon fibre tripod is worth it's weight in gold, more so actually. ;) I use it for just about every type of photography, from wildlife to family portraits. Now I don't use it all the time, such as causal outings, but for most serious work I have it with me.
    That's why I appreciate great macro shots, it took a heck of a lot of work to get that photo, especially if you stack it.
    Post edited by NSXTypeR on
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,089Moderator
    This was taken without a tripod. I NEVER do macro without flash so a tripod is not necessary. When the temps are high, these things hardly stop for a moment so no time for a monopod let alone a tripod. It is only 1/4" (6mm) long:

    Cliffe Pools 23 June (8 of 9)
    Always learning.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 1,847Member
    Fireworks and moon shots
  • ThomasHortonThomasHorton Posts: 323Member
    There are many, too many times that the tripod ...isn't allowed - a pity.

    My best,

    Mike
    We could start a whole separate thread on the "war against tripods/monopods". :(

    One of our local aerospace museums which has lously lighting, forbids not only tripods but monopods. Tripods I can understand from a tripping hazard. We have to protect those people walking through a museum with their face in their smart phones. L-)

    But no monopods? really? Harrumph.
    Gear: Camera obscura with an optical device which transmits and refracts light.
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