Flings with other camera manufacturers

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Comments

  • paulrpaulr Posts: 1,176Member
    If you ave problems with colour in Video, ColorFinale software can help
    Camera, Lens and Tripod and a few other Bits
  • BVSBVS Posts: 440Member

    There is a feature in some software processing programs that let you set the colors as if it were shot on Camera "X". I am forgetting what software that was at the moment, but could be useful for you given your color preferences.

    I think DxO OpticsPro has that option.

    D7100, 85 1.8G, 50 1.8G, 35 1.8G DX, Tokina 12-28 F4, 18-140, 55-200 VR DX
  • CaMeRaQuEsTCaMeRaQuEsT Posts: 357Member
    paulr said:

    If you ave problems with colour in Video, ColorFinale software can help

    I actually quite like Sony's videos SOOC because, unlike Nikon's, blacks don't get crushed, and the colors are pretty good, too, as they look exactly like local channel news'. The image is softer, though, than any Expeed 4 DX body's. Forget about Canon's and Fuji's, they are crappy and crappier still.
  • manhattanboymanhattanboy Posts: 1,003Member
    I am going to try the XT2 again this time without a grip and with the 100-400 to see how it handles a slow tele.

    The A9 is tempting but not out for the general public yet.
    We are getting close to the point where I will trade in all my DSLR gear for a mirrorless camera, but let's hope Nikon wakes up before they crash and gives us a better and cheaper A9 clone with proper Nikon controls and F-mount. They need such a camera to lunch THIS YEAR if they want to stay relevant IMHO. The charts indicate that next year mirrorless will equal and may surpass DSLR sales for the first time ever. The lack of a proper mirrorless strategy by Nikon is dumbfounding.

    If I were Sony's CEO I would go all out this year and release an A9S and/or A7Siii, as well as an A9R and/or A7riii, and an equivalent DX version with an a9000 with better ergonomics, battery, and using the A9's sensor and AF tech downsized to DX, as well as institute a price drop on the a6500 to <$900 and a6300 to <$600. They can smell Nikon's rotting body in the water and are closing fast; even if they end up taking a loss, the increase in brand value from becoming the overall number 2 camera maker would probably be worth the effort.
  • AndrewzAndrewz Posts: 122Member
    I just got together with a Fuji X-Pro2 and well I love it! Not ready to give up my D750, I fell the need for Full Frame and Mirrorless APS-C too...
    D750, P7000, F100 80-200 f2.8 AF-S, 24-120 f4, 50 f1.8D, 85 f1.8G, 14-24 f2.8

    Old friends now gone -D200, D300, 80-200 f2.3/D, 18-200, 35 f1.8G, 180 f2.8D, F, FM2, MD-12, 50 f1.4 Ais, 50 f1.8 Ais, 105 f2.5 Ais, 24 f2.8 Ais, 180 f2.8 ED Ais
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,445Member
    Hopefully Nikon will soon give us an option of both FX and DX mirrorless bodies.
  • AndrewzAndrewz Posts: 122Member
    @donaldejose, let's hope so! I'd like to see a mirrorless that is designed after the SP and comes with an adaptor for F-mount lenses. Due to the flange to sensor distance Nikon will have to come up with a new line of lens but with a simple spacer one could imagine that all of your current lenses would work.
    D750, P7000, F100 80-200 f2.8 AF-S, 24-120 f4, 50 f1.8D, 85 f1.8G, 14-24 f2.8

    Old friends now gone -D200, D300, 80-200 f2.3/D, 18-200, 35 f1.8G, 180 f2.8D, F, FM2, MD-12, 50 f1.4 Ais, 50 f1.8 Ais, 105 f2.5 Ais, 24 f2.8 Ais, 180 f2.8 ED Ais
  • AndrewzAndrewz Posts: 122Member
    edited May 2017
    Google image, Nikon SP in Black, it's truly beautiful design!
    Post edited by Andrewz on
    D750, P7000, F100 80-200 f2.8 AF-S, 24-120 f4, 50 f1.8D, 85 f1.8G, 14-24 f2.8

    Old friends now gone -D200, D300, 80-200 f2.3/D, 18-200, 35 f1.8G, 180 f2.8D, F, FM2, MD-12, 50 f1.4 Ais, 50 f1.8 Ais, 105 f2.5 Ais, 24 f2.8 Ais, 180 f2.8 ED Ais
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,445Member
    Andrew: "Due to the flange to sensor distance Nikon will have to come up with a new line of lens but with a simple spacer one could imagine that all of your current lenses would work." Yes, I hope they do that. It would not be too hard for Nikon to produce a few mirrorless only lenses in the most popular sizes. For all the less common applications we can use the DSLR lenses with a spacer. As they sell a lot of mirrorless bodies they can fill out the mirrorless lens line. I want a Nikon FX mirrorless body with a 28 or 35 mm pancake lens so I can put it into a pocket for easy carry but I will take a DX body of that type if they don't produce it in FX. Sort of update that Coolpix A and add an EVF.
  • manhattanboymanhattanboy Posts: 1,003Member

    Andrew: "Due to the flange to sensor distance Nikon will have to come up with a new line of lens but with a simple spacer one could imagine that all of your current lenses would work." Yes, I hope they do that. It would not be too hard for Nikon to produce a few mirrorless only lenses in the most popular sizes. For all the less common applications we can use the DSLR lenses with a spacer. As they sell a lot of mirrorless bodies they can fill out the mirrorless lens line. I want a Nikon FX mirrorless body with a 28 or 35 mm pancake lens so I can put it into a pocket for easy carry but I will take a DX body of that type if they don't produce it in FX. Sort of update that Coolpix A and add an EVF.

    Nikon would be better to produce a few mirrorless lenses that recess into the F-mount body to shrink them, but keep the native F-mount. This would be the ideal best of both worlds as you get to use your regular F-mount lenses without an adapter, but for the mirrorless camera there would be special mirrorless lenses designed to recess and hide their elements inside the body's mount.
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,445Member
    I would accept a lens that recesses into the mirror box but I think that design would also limit the size of the glass lens elements which could be used and may limit the lenses to f2 or f2.8.
  • BVSBVS Posts: 440Member
    edited May 2017
    The two choices may look something like this. The Pentax has a full DSLR flange distance. The Sony does not. Also note that there's no lens on the Pentax.




    Post edited by BVS on
    D7100, 85 1.8G, 50 1.8G, 35 1.8G DX, Tokina 12-28 F4, 18-140, 55-200 VR DX
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,445Member
    It seems to me Nikon would be better off not including an empty mirror box on a new mirrorless body.
  • manhattanboymanhattanboy Posts: 1,003Member

    It seems to me Nikon would be better off not including an empty mirror box on a new mirrorless body.

    Sony cameras are thin, but everyone complains about how the A7 and A6XXX series (which derived from the NEX-7 pictured above) have poor shooting ergonomics. The A9 is bigger and more in line with proper shooting ergonomics. Sony has not released the crop sensor A9 equivalent yet so its difficult to tell how much bigger it would be.

    Nikon need not make the body so thick like the Pentax. Remember that the newer DSLRs have deep grips as the body goes relatively thin in parts. I think realistically something like the Canon Eos M5 and SL1 are good design metrics for what Nikon could compete with or beat:
    https://www.imaging-resource.com/cameras/canon/sl1/vs/canon/eos-m5/specifications


  • HipShotHipShot Posts: 528Member
    I'm thinking about a Sony A6000 with a 16-50mm for carry-around. Could I do better for the same price?
  • CaMeRaQuEsTCaMeRaQuEsT Posts: 357Member
    BVS said:

    The two choices may look something like this. The Pentax has a full DSLR flange distance. The Sony does not. Also note that there's no lens on the Pentax.

    Actually, the Pentax does have a lens on it :) :




  • manhattanboymanhattanboy Posts: 1,003Member
    HipShot said:

    I'm thinking about a Sony A6000 with a 16-50mm for carry-around. Could I do better for the same price?

    What is the budget? Many folks here love spending your money, so just tell them how much you have to burn ;)
  • HipShotHipShot Posts: 528Member
    They're going for $598 with the 16-50mm lens.
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,445Member
    CaMeRaQuEsT: Now that is a pancake lens!
  • AndrewzAndrewz Posts: 122Member
    @HipShot, yeah I don't think you can beat the Sony a6000 for the price. Probably the best APS-C sensor mirrorless under $600. I do love my Xpro2 but it's a little more than $600.
    D750, P7000, F100 80-200 f2.8 AF-S, 24-120 f4, 50 f1.8D, 85 f1.8G, 14-24 f2.8

    Old friends now gone -D200, D300, 80-200 f2.3/D, 18-200, 35 f1.8G, 180 f2.8D, F, FM2, MD-12, 50 f1.4 Ais, 50 f1.8 Ais, 105 f2.5 Ais, 24 f2.8 Ais, 180 f2.8 ED Ais
  • CaMeRaQuEsTCaMeRaQuEsT Posts: 357Member
    edited May 2017
    I just thought of something that CaNikon can do to make a shorter flange native EF/F mount mirrorless camera: fit a close-up lens right in front of the sensor, one that can be power adjusted fore to aft to best compensate for infinity focus on the installed lens. If they do it right it won't take away much from I.Q. Also, they could do an in-body "speed booster" not only to shorten the actual flange distance, but also to run FF lenses reduced by 1.6/1.5X on their APS-C sensors, concentrating all the photons that a FF sensor would swallow on to the half as large APS-C sensor (what's cheaper, glass + additional focusing motor or the difference in cost btw a FF and an APS-C sensor?), of course they would need to make the APS-C sensor used with deeper light wells to be able to provide the same DR advantage FF has over APS-C, but they would be making the cheapest and possibly smallest "FF-equivalent" cameras in town, while making the most of a cooler, faster and less power hungry sensor.
    Post edited by CaMeRaQuEsT on
  • manhattanboymanhattanboy Posts: 1,003Member
    Pretty cool ideas cameraquest.
    We had also talked about putting in a built in ND filter for video.
    Another idea would be to put in a lens IS element instead of sensor stabilization.
  • CaMeRaQuEsTCaMeRaQuEsT Posts: 357Member
    I wonder if the focusing plane correcting lens idea could actually be implemented at the micro lens level: I think that's how Lytro implemented their "lightfield" sensor, with differnt focusing distance microlenses aimed at different pixels; if so, then it wouldn't cost CaNikon a dime more to "create" a compact, short flange distance EF/F mount mirrorless body. The only downside is that, just as in their DSLRs, they will be limited in the amount and variety of non native mount lenses that can be adapted.

  • manhattanboymanhattanboy Posts: 1,003Member
    So I tried out the Olympus mark I version of their flagship camera along with their "Pro" 300f4.
    Overall I am highly impressed with the camera. I haven't put the raw files through my usual desktop programs yet, but peaking at them on the laptop there is little penalty to the 4/3 sensor compared to DX. Full frame still trumps the IQ, but the idea here is to get distance and for that the Olympus is amazing.
    The shooting rate is super fast. I slowed down the rate to "only" 12 for as I find any more that that is really just an exercise is throwing out extras in post. The camera shoots silently and continuously with tracking mirroring the D500. I'm not sure if it is as good as the D500 but boy is it getting close.
    The lens was the biggest disappointment. Olympus made a sharp lens but the usability is poor. It's way too easy to accidentally bump the focus ring, and in doing so the lens is thrown into manual focus only. That is very frustrating when you need to quickly get a shot off and the camera is not focusing and you are like d#mnn this thing! The battery is great, better than Fuji. The viewfinder is decent, but has a strange blackout after each shot in continuous shooting. Is that done to simulate a shutter? Overall the speed has made me even more hungry to try the A9. Will it be an Olympus but with better IQ? If so, I might be finally tempted to move from Thom's sampler category to switcher.
  • manhattanboymanhattanboy Posts: 1,003Member
    I have been shooting with the Sony a9 for a little while now. I will update with more thoughts later, but he is my first take:
    Love the speed and silent shutter. The viewfinder is amazing, so fast that my brain gets fooled almost every time I look through it and think its an optical viewfinder! One time I was shooting in bright sun and the view was a little overexposed. Being used to optical viewfinders my brain just assumed it was bright out but the exposure would turn out alright (those used to shooting in bright sun with a large FF viewfinder and wide aperture lens know what I mean), but then I realized that I had accidentally hit the exposure comp dial and bumped it to +3. Its amazing to see that the live world changes up and down in exposure in real time as you dial in the settings. I'm sure the Oly and Fuji that I tried can do something similar, but this viewfinder is on another level. As a negative from that story, I find the lack of a lock on the exposure comp dial a downside (they have locks on the left-hand dials, why not one on the exposure comp dial on the right?

    The AF is very good. I would say fairly D500 like in its ability to track. Because the camera can shoot so fast, I leave the tracking sensitivity higher than I would on the Nikon and just end up with a couple out of focus shots for when something comes into frame. Apparently there is a DX crop mode, but I haven't figured out how to set that up to a button yet (ANYONE know, please respond?). Speaking of the buttons, the joystick is similar to the D500 and as useful for moving the AF point.

    The Sony menus are absolute garbage. Memo to Sony: if you are going to copy Canon and make your lenses white, at least copy Canon's menus too as yours suck. Simple things like using the second SD card for overflow feel impossible to set up!! This is not my first time shooting on a Sony either; I don't remember having so much trouble setting up the a7r2, moreover I have recently shot with a bunch of other cameras and even the Olympus (!!) felt more user friendly. Sony did something to the menus here with the a9 and frankly I don't think it was a positive change.

    The speed is amazing, but compared to a D810 or the Sony A7r2, the image quality is noticeably poorer. With the a9, you don't get those razor sharp pictures that you would on those other cameras. This is probably the biggest reason that I would not buy the camera right now. An a9r... THAT has my mouth watering.

    The battery is outstanding. I can shoot all day on one battery, which is frankly amazing for a mirrorless camera of this caliber.

    The weight and size are outstanding. The grip is better than the a7. Memo to Sony: increase the size of the next a7 series to put in this awesome new battery and make the cameras easier to hold.

    The Sony a9 RAWs have decent play up or down in exposure. I still feel they are not as crisp in developing as an 810 would be and are probably more similar to a Nikon DX camera, where images look great but you can't pixel peep at 150% and expect perfection like you can on an 810 image or a full frame Canon shot.

    I still have lots more shooting to do, but I think like any new product, the a9 still has some shortcomings that will probably make v2 the one to put your money down for. Hit me up with questions or things you want to know.
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