File number and shutter count

2

Comments

  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,119Member
    Newer cameras are rated for well over 150k, even the D7500 is rated for 200k, so 150k isn’t the end of the road by a long shot.

    Since the shutter, mirror assembly and battery are the most likely points of use based failure, chances of failure are low if those parts are new or replaced. Any camera made in the last 6 years is more than good enough for family travel shots.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 886Member
    Battery is no problem to replace (and has been no problem), but I feel like there is something with the mirrorbox that gets out of order when a dslr gets old. My D800 produces spots on the sensor and I cannot get the AF as good as I think it used to be. It is around 150k now. Does anyone have the same experience?
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 2,025Member
    yes and it has a warrantee
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 886Member
    Thanks, I didn't think about warranty for such an old camera. I'll check it out.
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,123Member
    edited December 2018
    Yes, we had an old thread about shutter actuations.

    https://forum.nikonrumors.com/discussion/346/how-many-shutter-actuations-does-did-your-camera-have/p1

    There's also a volunteer database about shutter actuations and camera death.

    http://www.olegkikin.com/shutterlife/

    My D7000 is at 22,795 right now.
    Post edited by NSXTypeR on
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 2,025Member
    I just sold some cameras vis MPB the max shutter count they will accept is 50K.
    (excellent no hassle no post to pay and very fast payment)
  • daveznspacedaveznspace Posts: 117Member
    snakebunk said:

    @daveznspace: Because I get worried that they will break when I am on a trip, and because new cameras have better specs. Would you say a 150k camera is as reliable as a new one if you replace the shutter?


    Not necessarily. I've only had shutters go out on my d7000's. The first one went to 178,000 before crapping out the 2nd one (aka newer one) only lasted 64,000.

    I've seen people with only a few thousand go out.

    "Would you say a 150k camera is as reliable as a new one if you replace the shutter?"
    Absolutely. They usually check the camera out and adjust AF and other things if needed as well.
  • daveznspacedaveznspace Posts: 117Member
    If you want better specs then get a new camera, if you want to save the extra money replace shutter.

    The shutter is so cheap that you could replace it and buy another camera as a backup.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,235Moderator

    If you want better specs then get a new camera, if you want to save the extra money replace shutter.

    The shutter is so cheap that you could replace it and buy another camera as a backup.

    That is the way to do it.
    Always learning.
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 886Member
    From experience I have never had any shutter problems with my three cameras (D300s & D800 around 150k, D810 82k), but it is a worry, and all batteries are still good enough. My problems have been with oil spots on the sensor and a feeling that af gets less reliable. If I don't buy a D850 this spring I will probably check with Nikon what they can do with my D800 and D810 (replace the shutter and fine tune the mirror box maybe).

    Thanks everyone for helpful information!
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,235Moderator
    @snakebunk - whatever you do to a D800/810 the AF will not approach a D850. Really. It blew me away.
    Always learning.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 2,025Member
    I don't think we realize how getting accurate focus every time impacts on image quality same lens on a D7200 with more pixel density is not as good as that lens on a D850.
  • mhedgesmhedges Posts: 1,423Member
    Agree and I think that’s an advantage of mirrorless in some situations.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,119Member
    mhedges said:

    Agree and I think that’s an advantage of mirrorless in some situations.

    Unless the subject moves, then mirrorless is worse...
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • mhedgesmhedges Posts: 1,423Member
    Yep. That’s why I said some situations. Although I would expect the DSLR advantage to shrink as mirrorless AF improves.
  • daveznspacedaveznspace Posts: 117Member
    snakebunk said:

    From experience I have never had any shutter problems with my three cameras (D300s & D800 around 150k, D810 82k), but it is a worry, and all batteries are still good enough. My problems have been with oil spots on the sensor and a feeling that af gets less reliable. If I don't buy a D850 this spring I will probably check with Nikon what they can do with my D800 and D810 (replace the shutter and fine tune the mirror box maybe).

    Thanks everyone for helpful information!

    One of the best things you can do is learn to clean your own sensors... really, it's very simple. Not that long ago I posted instructions on how to do it.

  • mhedgesmhedges Posts: 1,423Member
    I’ve cleaned my D7200 sensor, and with the proper kit is was very easy. I’m a little wary of cleaning my Z6 sensor since it has IBIS and Nikon has been very explicit saying that folks should not attempt to clean it.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,119Member
    Just another strike again mirrorless, the sensor is completely exposed on every lens change, and you cannot clean it yourself.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • daveznspacedaveznspace Posts: 117Member
    mhedges said:

    I’ve cleaned my D7200 sensor, and with the proper kit is was very easy. I’m a little wary of cleaning my Z6 sensor since it has IBIS and Nikon has been very explicit saying that folks should not attempt to clean it.

    They said the same thing about dslr sensors as well
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,235Moderator
    PB_PM said:

    Just another strike again mirrorless, the sensor is completely exposed on every lens change, and you cannot clean it yourself.

    That is a problem.
    Always learning.
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 886Member

    @snakebunk - whatever you do to a D800/810 the AF will not approach a D850. Really. It blew me away.

    From what I have read and heard, I think you are right :).


    One of the best things you can do is learn to clean your own sensors... really, it's very simple. Not that long ago I posted instructions on how to do it.

    Thanks, I have done it once. It turned out ok but not perfect, and oil spots kept coming back on the D800. But I will do it again. Like you say it is not too hard.
    PB_PM said:

    Just another strike again mirrorless, the sensor is completely exposed on every lens change, and you cannot clean it yourself.

    Why can't you clean the sensor on mirrorless cameras?
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,235Moderator
    IBIS makes it risky - at least for the moment until we find out how Nikon do it.
    Always learning.
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 886Member
    Ok, I understand. That just about takes the advantage out of ibis.

    In order to protect the sensor, I wonder if it would be possible to add a function that closes the shutter each time the camera is turned off. What do you think?
  • mhedgesmhedges Posts: 1,423Member
    PB_PM said:

    Just another strike again mirrorless, the sensor is completely exposed on every lens change, and you cannot clean it yourself.

    mhedges said:

    I’ve cleaned my D7200 sensor, and with the proper kit is was very easy. I’m a little wary of cleaning my Z6 sensor since it has IBIS and Nikon has been very explicit saying that folks should not attempt to clean it.

    They said the same thing about dslr sensors as well
    Yes that's true. To be fair Nikon has always said that users shouldn't attempt to clean the sensor. And I don't really know if IBIS makes it more risky or not. I'm just reluctant to do it, at least until there are reports of other folks doing it without a problem.
    snakebunk said:

    Ok, I understand. That just about takes the advantage out of ibis.

    In order to protect the sensor, I wonder if it would be possible to add a function that closes the shutter each time the camera is turned off. What do you think?

    Well that's how Canon did it with the EOS R. But that method has risks too since shutters are very fragile and likely easier to damage than the sensor itself.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,119Member
    If dust killed shutters, DSLR's would all have dead shutters, but they don't. Seems logical to me to have some kind of physical barrier there during lens swaps.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
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