Pixel count

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  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,491Member
    edited September 2019




    And another thing to remember. There must be zero movement for pixel shift to work.

    All mostly true. I've yet to have a painting on an easel move during copy though. I do think though that each frame taken during pixel shift should be only the native res of the sensor? The gain is when they are assembled together as I understand.

    Yes, true. But let's use a landscape with foliage as an example. I like to use a tripod with the camera set at base ISO which means a slow shutter speed at most times when the light quality (but not intensity) is good. ANY wind will sabatoge the shot and this gets worse as resolution increases.

    I know a guy that shoots trees with top of the line Phase One. When he goes somewhere the length of time that he books is "finding shot time" plus "getting shot time" and the "getting shot time" is usually a week. There is one shot he showed me where he went to New Zealand (from Canada) three times for a week (so 21 days of shooting time) to get the shot as that is how long it took to find a time with zero wind. As an aside, he made a lot of money from that image.

    www.friedmanphoto.com
    Post edited by WestEndFoto on
  • FreezeActionFreezeAction Posts: 860Member




    And another thing to remember. There must be zero movement for pixel shift to work.

    All mostly true. I've yet to have a painting on an easel move during copy though. I do think though that each frame taken during pixel shift should be only the native res of the sensor? The gain is when they are assembled together as I understand.

    Yes, true. But let's use a landscape with foliage as an example. I like to use a tripod with the camera set at base ISO which means a slow shutter speed at most times when the light quality (but not intensity) is good. ANY wind will sabatoge the shot and this gets worse as resolution increases.

    I know a guy that shoots trees with top of the line Phase One. When he goes somewhere the length of time that he books is "finding shot time" plus "getting shot time" and the "getting shot time" is usually a week. There is one shot he showed me where he went to New Zealand (from Canada) three times for a week (so 21 days of shooting time) to get the shot as that is how long it took to find a time with zero wind. As an aside, he made a lot of money from that image.
    I well understand this. I asked a photographer that was showing a 6 minute view camera exposure how he got a still day to make the shot? He went to the same spot for shoot every year for 3 years at the right time and it was worth it. He is known for 5'x9' darkroom prints. Long exposures, tiny fstops & using orange/red filters and tmax are his chosen means to capture landscapes. I know that you can't just walk up and take a pixel shift image any time you want to but when the conditions are right it can be worth it. It's an extra tool in the box some of the time.

  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,491Member




    And another thing to remember. There must be zero movement for pixel shift to work.

    All mostly true. I've yet to have a painting on an easel move during copy though. I do think though that each frame taken during pixel shift should be only the native res of the sensor? The gain is when they are assembled together as I understand.

    Yes, true. But let's use a landscape with foliage as an example. I like to use a tripod with the camera set at base ISO which means a slow shutter speed at most times when the light quality (but not intensity) is good. ANY wind will sabatoge the shot and this gets worse as resolution increases.

    I know a guy that shoots trees with top of the line Phase One. When he goes somewhere the length of time that he books is "finding shot time" plus "getting shot time" and the "getting shot time" is usually a week. There is one shot he showed me where he went to New Zealand (from Canada) three times for a week (so 21 days of shooting time) to get the shot as that is how long it took to find a time with zero wind. As an aside, he made a lot of money from that image.
    I well understand this. I asked a photographer that was showing a 6 minute view camera exposure how he got a still day to make the shot? He went to the same spot for shoot every year for 3 years at the right time and it was worth it. He is known for 5'x9' darkroom prints. Long exposures, tiny fstops & using orange/red filters and tmax are his chosen means to capture landscapes. I know that you can't just walk up and take a pixel shift image any time you want to but when the conditions are right it can be worth it. It's an extra tool in the box some of the time.

    Yes, I agree with that. What I don't agree with is people thinking they have a 200mp camera.
  • FreezeActionFreezeAction Posts: 860Member
    Announcements like these just add fuel to my fire for more quality pixels to work with....

    https://www.dpreview.com/news/3592438432/epson-reveals-surecolor-p7570-and-p9570-wide-format-printers-offering-museum-quality-prints?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2019-october-03&ref_=pe_1822230_440038810_dpr_nl_392_12

    Finally a printhead from Epson that can be user cleaned that doesn't just halfway clean by wasting a lot ink. I do like the no need to switch between photo and matte black as that was also an ink waster. The speed at which poster prints can be produced is simply another money maker. I believe the limelight of new products in the digital graphics industry needs to be shared by the printer makers. More and more inputs are going down while the outputs are rising. Times are improving in the sector.
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