E type vs G type vs Tamron: What's the Difference

MrFotoFoolMrFotoFool Posts: 33Member
I am new to Nikon (and NikonRumors) after 20 years with Canon. (I could not find a thread on this topic). I am using a D850 and two E type lenses, but want an ultra wide angle (zoom or not). What exactly is the difference between G type and E type lenses? Also, is the Tamron 15-30 f2.8 G2 equivalent to a Nikon G or E type? I assume so because it appears to not have an aperture ring?

Comments

  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 1,816Member
    Well G stands for Gelded which means they removed the aperture ring and E means electronically actuated Aperture . Just be aware in case you upgrade that some of the Tamron lenses will not work with the Z series.
    Personally I just use a Samyang 14 mm .. a manual focus lens ..I just tape it up at 7ft and crop when necessary its so sharp. ( and cheap)
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,999Member
    edited July 15
    Tamron, Tokina and Sigma’s lenses are all ‘G’ type at this point, other than some older models that are ‘D’ type, but I don’t think any of those are available new anymore. The D850 has the motor to drive D lenses anyway, so even if you were to get one it would work assuming there are no firmware issues; not a problem with Nikon lenses, only third party.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,008Member
    edited July 15
    I have pre-AIS, AIS, D type, G type and E type. The last three are auto-focus and the farther to the right in my list, the better they tend to focus. Also, if you by a Z camera, the D type will become manual focus.

    There are other minor differences. For example, the faster bodies tend to have a hire frame rate (FPS) with E type.

    That said, I would not fret it about it. Buy Gs or Es and consider yourself done on this topic so you can focus on taking great pictures.
    Post edited by WestEndFoto on
  • MrFotoFoolMrFotoFool Posts: 33Member
    Thanks for all the replies.
  • djrdjr Posts: 4Member
    The E lenses are best on your D850 b/c they are designed for higher megapixel bodies.

    Meaning, if you pixel peep, crop, print large..... you may find that a G lens is not adequately sharp. Many don't have an issue with this.

    For any Z7 or D850 or D810 shooter,
    an E lens is a match made in heaven for you.
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,008Member
    edited July 30
    I would not say that the E lenses are designed for high megapixel bodies. I would say that Nikon recently started designing lenses for high megapixel bodies AND they upgraded to E from G. Mostly unrelated . The timing is a coincidence.

    I would note that my old 24 PC lens is an E lens and it is wanting on my D850.

    While I have the 400 2.8E, I am sure that the G is sharper than my 105 1.4E or my 28 1.4E.
    Post edited by WestEndFoto on
  • SportsSports Posts: 365Member
    Sigma says "Nikon electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism included" which must mean an E lens, right? Tokina says "electric diaphragm specific to the Nikon mount". So they seem to have this om SOME of their lenses. I don't know about Tamron.
    D300, J1
    Sigma 70-200/2.8, 105/2.8
    Nikon 50/1.4G, 18-200, 80-400G
    1 10-30, 30-110
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,999Member
    edited August 1
    Which lens? All the Sigma glass (Art series) for Nikon that I've used still have a mechanical aperture lever, making them G type.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 841Member
    PB_PM: The Sigma 500/4 Sports for Nikon has electronic aperture control. I think it was the first Sigma lens to do this for Nikon while they have had electronic aperture control for Canon even earlier.
  • SportsSports Posts: 365Member
    @PB_PM ... and the 60-600 and 70-200. And the 40mm Art. (And maybe others?) The newest Sigma lenses, in other words, are E type lenses, it seems.
    D300, J1
    Sigma 70-200/2.8, 105/2.8
    Nikon 50/1.4G, 18-200, 80-400G
    1 10-30, 30-110
  • MrFotoFoolMrFotoFool Posts: 33Member
    So G type is mechanical aperture and E type is electronic aperture? Since there is no physical aperture ring on either, how does this work? What (in real world use) is the difference?
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,008Member

    So G type is mechanical aperture and E type is electronic aperture? Since there is no physical aperture ring on either, how does this work? What (in real world use) is the difference?

    The aperture ring does not donote E or G type. It is merely a method of controlling the aperture. However, the aperture ring is found on D type lenses (screw drive).

    Not sure of the technical details between the G and E type. Some relevant articles may be:

    https://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/nikortek.htm

    https://photographylife.com/nikon-lens-nomenclature
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,999Member
    edited August 3

    So G type is mechanical aperture and E type is electronic aperture? Since there is no physical aperture ring on either, how does this work? What (in real world use) is the difference?

    The G type has a mechanical link to the body via a lever on the camera body and a switch on the butt end of the lens. The E type is controlled electronically via chips in the lens and computer on the camera body. In theory the electronic aperture on the E type creates more consistent shot to shot exposure, overall and more so in high speed shooting situations.

    In the real world most users are unlikely to notice the difference, outside of high speed shooting situations.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • MrFotoFoolMrFotoFool Posts: 33Member
    PB_PM said:

    The G type has a mechanical link to the body via a lever on the camera body and a switch on the butt end of the lens. The E type is controlled electronically via chips in the lens and computer on the camera body. In theory the electronic aperture on the E type creates more consistent shot to shot exposure, overall and more so in high speed shooting situations.

    In the real world most users are unlikely to notice the difference, outside of high speed shooting situations.

    Thanks for a great explanation!
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,999Member
    edited August 5

    Here is the back end of "G" lens, in this case the Macro 105mm F2.8G ED VR. If you look at the left upper side of the inner plastic wrapped ring you can see the mechanical lever in a slot. "E" lenses do not have this lever, and will not work on many older cameras, not that it is an issue for anyone with a modern camera made in the last 5-6 years.

    And comparing the "G" type to the older style from all lenses (AF, AF-D, AI, AI-S, and Non-AI) used before the "G" type, including lenses going back to the 1960s, which still had a physical aperture ring that can be operated manually.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,008Member
  • mhedgesmhedges Posts: 1,182Member
    Yes excellent posts @PB_PM.

    Maybe this has already been mentioned (or goes without saying) but you can manually move the lever on the G lenses to see the aperture movement. Also I believe some of the AF-P lenses still have the mechanical aperture (which makes no sense to me).
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,999Member
    The mechanical system is less expensive to manufacture, since the lens needs fewer electronic components.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • mhedgesmhedges Posts: 1,182Member
    Makes sense. I think all the DX AF-P's are mechanical. The FX lens is an "E" lens.
  • MrFotoFoolMrFotoFool Posts: 33Member
    Very helpful. I have three E type AF-S lenses, so not an issue with my D850. I may or may not add a super wide angle which is where this might become a factor.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 3,999Member
    edited August 6
    It’s not an issue at all, since all Nikon lenses back to the late 1970s and early 1980s will work without a hitch on your D850. There is no difference to the user from a mounting or operational standpoint, unless you were to use a manual focus lens. Even the early auto focus lenses with manual aperture rings have full control from the camera body (when locked at maximum aperture) just like your E lenses do.
    Post edited by PB_PM on
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 1,816Member
    Fotofool said

    . I may or may not add a super wide angle.


    If you do the Samyang 14mm is fantastic ..set at 10ft and just shoot
  • MrFotoFoolMrFotoFool Posts: 33Member
    The Samyang or Rokinon (the same I think) 14mm f2.8 is intriguing. It even has autofocus and reviews on Adorama seem to be good. Though one guy's "review" was just a link to his Youtube review and I started watching but it was very amateurish and I stopped watching when he said this 14mm lens when he puts it on his ASP-C (not a typo, he said ASP not APS) camera becomes the equivalent of a 136mm lens!
  • MrFotoFoolMrFotoFool Posts: 33Member
    I still have not gotten an ultra wide lens and sort of like having less equipment. However I see NR just posted the Tamron 15-30G2 will be $200 off this coming weekend only. Hmmm...
  • mhedgesmhedges Posts: 1,182Member

    I still have not gotten an ultra wide lens and sort of like having less equipment. However I see NR just posted the Tamron 15-30G2 will be $200 off this coming weekend only. Hmmm...

    Also consider the Sigma ART 14-24. It's routinely on sale, and is very nice. Big and heavy though. And prone to flare in sidelit conditions (which I imagine is an issue with all of these fast ultrawides).
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