Dangers From Being A Photog?

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  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    "Zooming with your feet" is not always the best option ;)
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,675Member
    Especially when the subject views you as dinner.
  • FreezeActionFreezeAction Posts: 862Member
    Or the subject is just mad with whoever it can get to...
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,251Member
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,398Moderator
    Even at my age, I seem to understand the risks, yet will very clearly place myself in some degree of danger when shooting.

    Current travel plans have me in new Orleans this summer and am giving consideration to going out one night to do the Bourbon Street crowd. I am investigating hiring a body guard to be with me on the shoot. D800E and D4 will be around my neck, and I do not want to lose either my cameras nor my life, so a "Jack Reacher" style accompanying me may be in order.

    About 20 years ago I was shooting in the Mardi Gras city, apparently captured a store where a lot of stolen merchandise was being offered, and had my life and limb threatened. Fortunately I was with four others, big guys, who stood around the individual doing the threatening, and he backed off.

    Inside a club of course is off limits, not something to even risk.
    Msmoto, mod
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,444Member
    Off duty policemen in some cities are allowed to work security for some events and sometimes even in uniform. If you could get one of those to follow you around in New Orleans that would be impressive and surely a strong visual signal to anyone thinking of stealing your gear.
  • DenverShooterDenverShooter Posts: 415Member


    But I felt lucky...if he had been armed with a firearm, I was gone.

    They are illegal in cali...

    Denver Shooter
    Msmoto said:

    Even at my age, I seem to understand the risks, yet will very clearly place myself in some degree of danger when shooting.

    Current travel plans have me in new Orleans this summer and am giving consideration to going out one night to do the Bourbon Street crowd. I am investigating hiring a body guard to be with me on the shoot. D800E and D4 will be around my neck, and I do not want to lose either my cameras nor my life, so a "Jack Reacher" style accompanying me may be in order.

    About 20 years ago I was shooting in the Mardi Gras city, apparently captured a store where a lot of stolen merchandise was being offered, and had my life and limb threatened. Fortunately I was with four others, big guys, who stood around the individual doing the threatening, and he backed off.

    Inside a club of course is off limits, not something to even risk.

    It's a war zone in NOLA. I was there last year (with a phalanx of LEO in tow) and the State Police were out in force to try and curb the gang violence on Bourbon Street. Typically 6 to 8 per block and roving groups of mounted police. When the City runs out of money they will probably be gone and the gangs will be back. Not a nice place anymore at night.

    Find the biggest baddest body guard with a CCW you can find and get behind him when the shooting starts.

    Denver Shooter
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,398Moderator
    edited March 2016
    Thanks, Mike.....oh yes, passed General, working on Extra...


    in NOLA, maybe I will work with my Olympus...very small, non intrusive, but still have some folks around me....
    Post edited by Msmoto on
    Msmoto, mod
  • DenverShooterDenverShooter Posts: 415Member
    Congrats on your general!! Wait until you get the HF bug... I still remember the day I busted a pileup on 17M and logged the Antarctic! YL are rare on HF and you will collect a lot of QSOs.

    Denver Shooter
  • blandbland Posts: 812Member
    edited April 2016
    https://www.facebook.com/fastfields/posts/10208023882013544?fref=nf&pnref=story

    This happened today, at the 1:48 mark of the video the race car hits the photographer Ian Tocher.

    He was life flighted and is in very critical condition. I've heard he loss both legs but I do not know that for a fact.

    The racer is also in critical condition but was expected to live.
    Post edited by bland on
  • blandbland Posts: 812Member
    Just got word the driver Ronnie Davis has passed away.
  • Rx4PhotoRx4Photo Posts: 1,200Member
    That's a very sad situation for all involved, Bland.
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  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,398Moderator
    As one who occasionally covers some racing, these incidents are always very sad. But, the simple fact is racing is extremely dangerous when we get into the very high speeds some vehicles obtain, this class I believe is about 200 mph....

    The photography is often done by remote cameras, just for this reason.

    Our prayers for all involved...
    Msmoto, mod
  • blandbland Posts: 812Member
    Msmoto said:



    The photography is often done by remote cameras, just for this reason.

    This is true in the NHRA and should be a requirement in all associations. I'm sure the PDRA will now adapt this rule in their association.

    I've seen so much over the years I will not go pass the 200ft mark nor will I shoot starting line shots anymore after seeing a nitro harley explode last year.

    When shooting motorsports one most stay alert at all times. He had plenty of time to bail and for whatever reason Ian just stood there.


  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,509Moderator
    I once was shooting a rally stage. I stood on the inside of a bend where I thought I was safe but I learned nowhere is safe. The approaching driver flicked left to get the tail out for the right hander but got it wrong and ran right through the spot where I was with my camera on a tripod. Fortunately I read it early and had cleared off.
    Always learning.
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,398Moderator
    My experience suggest I am so intent on the photograph I have no real understanding of what is happening. When shooting photos I never see the race vehicles, as i am doing what i need to follow the action.

    This is helpful for me as I will be shooting some drag racing from beyond the finish line, but will be behind the edge of a concrete building about 50 feet from the track edge...if this is allowed after the above incident. Otherwise, from the top of a spectator bleacher with the long lens.
    Msmoto, mod
  • DenverShooterDenverShooter Posts: 415Member
    Distance is good. The reason I have the Nikon 800mm F/5.6 is so I can be way outside of "harms way".

    Denver Shooter
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,398Moderator
  • FreezeActionFreezeAction Posts: 862Member
    edited May 2016
    I have not read all of the posts in this thread so I don't know if this has been mentioned before or not. This last week I've been working on images of a 20 year old friend that was killed by a drunk deputy sheriff. There is psychological danger of getting to close to your subjects. It's been hard. I've just finished the edits on the last image. This has happened so many times but I still take it personal. The first was a 3 year old boy who played with my daughter of the same age. 2 weeks after a discussion with his mom about the importance of teaching children to mind and giving an example she said if that had been her son he would be dead. Well he did die from not minding. Eventually I gave her all of the photos of her son. 10 years ago several adult friends got killed on motorcycles within a month. I stopped doing bike nights for that reason. Somehow I've got to do Rodeo until early August and then that is over. My head is still messed up.
    Post edited by FreezeAction on
  • DenverShooterDenverShooter Posts: 415Member
    So three of my Son's High School classmates were killed in a horrific car wreck early last week...

    I shot all of their graduation pictures with their families the week before...

    And I shot several of their wakes (at the request of their families). Hardest shooting I have ever done...

    The Families asked for all of the shots of their children I shot over the last couple of years.

    You Bet..

    You suck it up and you do the job and you put your feelings into a different "box" and you shoot what needs to be shot for the survivors and their memories of their children...

    And at the end of the day you take solace in the fact you have helped their families deal with their grief..

    Is there any higher calling in photography?

    Denver Shooter
  • FreezeActionFreezeAction Posts: 862Member
    None that I know of. It's the youth that hurts. Those that lived long full lives is easier.
  • PhotobugPhotobug Posts: 5,751Member
    +1 DenverShooter. Nothing else can be said.
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  • IronheartIronheart Posts: 3,017Moderator
    "Memories are the scribe of the soul"
    - Aristotle

    If memories are the scribe, then photos are the illustrations in the book. Some cultures believe that a photograph takes a piece of your soul. I believe that photos of loved ones who have passed on, are our way of reconnecting to a small piece of that.
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,251Member
    This photographer could have been obliterated by this car.

    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • dissentdissent Posts: 1,317Member
    - Ian . . . [D7000, D7100; Nikon glass: 35 f1.8, 85 f1.8, 70-300 VR, 105 f2.8 VR, 12-24 f4; 16-85 VR, 300 f4D, 14E-II TC, SB-400, SB-700 . . . and still plenty of ignorance]
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