Wedding Photography...professional equipment

124

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  • Vipmediastar_JZVipmediastar_JZ Posts: 1,708Member
    edited November 2013
    I talked to a couple of you offline and thanks for the input.

    The person that volunterred for my shoot a few months back is now engaged and asked me to shoot her wedding. Now I have done a few with DX cameras as backup and 1 as main. This year I didn't take any jobs because I wanted to learn FX. Later on I felt confortable with it and asked that person to volunteer.
    So we are meeting up soon to discuss the paid event.

    This is what I have planned to take:
    *D800-With 35mm 1.4 on black rapid strap.
    *D800-with a 70-200 2.8 with flash bracket with sb-800 on my person as well. Possibly a monopod and A small tripod for mounthing flash/boom or something.

    *For additonal lens in bag as backup 50mm 1.8g and 85mm 1.8g.
    *Depending on the bridal party I may consider renting from a rental place the 14-24 2.8, macro 105 and 24-70.
    ( I am planning on selling the 24-70 to purchse the 70-200. I love the sigma more than 24-70 at 35. And thus I prefer the 70-200 for the reach. )

    *I have 4xd800 batteries.
    *iTTL cord for sb-800
    *Cyber commander and receivers from Paul C Buff for sb-800 and Alien Bees b800 x2.
    I plan on renting/buying sb-910.
    *Two umbrellas they are white/shoot thru
    *2-stands for b800.
    *expo disk for white balance and grey card.
    *multiple sd/cf cards
    *mulitple packs of batteries for flash will be purchased.

    The venue is planned for an outside event.
    5 in 1 reflector?

    Does this seem like a good setup for the event?

    Rental for d800 and 12-24 24-70 70-200 is about 400 with shipping and insurance.
    I could just sell the 24-70 as I don't really use it as much and pick up the sb-910 or
    Battery pack for b800 and have my sibling/assistant assist with that.

    thoughts?




    Post edited by Vipmediastar_JZ on
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,328Member
    My daughter just had her informal wedding shot and the results were great. Most surprisingly to me the photographer shot the entire event with a Cannon, one zoom lens (probably the 24-70f2.8L or 24-105f4L) and one flash (often with a diffusion dome over it. I was amazed at the sparse equipment she used and with the results she achieved. I should note this event was not in a big church but in an historic building's ballroom. So perhaps her use of bounce flash worked in that venue but would not work in a larger room. For what it is worth take a look at the results this photographer produced with one body and one zoom lens and one flash. http://bonniesen.smugmug.com/Weddings/Elizabeth-Michael#!/i-S3hVdCg It could be that she had a back-up camera in a bag somewhere but I never saw it. When I get a copy of the photos on disk I will check the EXIF data to see if she changed lenses or bodies without me noticing it.
  • sevencrossingsevencrossing Posts: 2,800Member
    Vipmediastar_JZ

    that's a lot of gear

    at the risk of teaching my granny to suck eggs

    do give a lot of thought to how you are going to carry your equipment

    it needs to be secure and you need to get at what you need quickly








  • Vipmediastar_JZVipmediastar_JZ Posts: 1,708Member
    edited November 2013
    @sevencrossing indeed. I been collecting gear for 5 years now.
    + backup is essential. Once my camera shutter locked. My backup was with the other person. I turned off camera, removed flash, removed batter. Missed 3 shots. People were talking. Camera came back up. Continued shooting.

    I will have an assitant for that and man the "studio" if thats what they want. Also my cousin will be the DJ if im not mistaken. He always lets me park my gear next to him.
    Post edited by Vipmediastar_JZ on
  • Rx4PhotoRx4Photo Posts: 1,200Member
    edited November 2013
    @ Vipmediastar_JZ, I recently watched a seminar put on by Brett Florens ("fashion" wedding photography - Google him) and a neat trick he used was puting a Nikkor 10.5mm Fisheye lens on his D4 set to auto DX mode, attaching this to a monopod, prefocusing, setting the timer for a 10 second delay and several shots, then holding the camera up and above a dancing crowd at the reception. He got some really cool views that most brides and grooms would appreciate. I tried this with my 14-24mm at 14mm at home and I do think that a fisheye would render a more appealing image. Might consider adding that technique to your gameplan.
    Post edited by Rx4Photo on
    D800 | D7000 | Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 | 24-70mm f/2.8 | 70-200mm f/2.8 | 35mm f/1.8G | 85mm f/1.4G | Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM | Zeiss 100mm Makro-Planar ZF.2 | Flash controllers: Phottix Odin TTL

  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • TaoTeJaredTaoTeJared Posts: 1,306Member
    @Golf007sd Nice find! Interesting on the view angles, not sure about the 2.8 quality though. Lots of compromises to make shooting that way. I have the sigma 15mm fisheye, and I don't like it at 2.8 at all. F/4-6.3 is good enough though. Very interesting though.

    @ Vipmediastar_JZ, That is a hell of a lot of gear! I probably take that much as well, but swap lenses out for different "situations." The key is planning on what gear you desire to use for each, and it's back up when that particular lens may not work. i.e. 35mm is good, but if you have to stand 20 feet away, it would be better to have the 70-200 and 24-70 as you need the reach. Also it maybe really close and you need to drop the 70-200 for the 24-70 or wider.

    (What I make a list for)
    Standard Situations: Pre-wedding, Decorations, Service ceremony, Exiting church, Formal shots with Family and Wedding party, Formal shots with Bride and Groom, Reception (entrance, cake & decor, speeches, party). It is very important to get shots for each one of those and you need to make sure you have the gear attached to get it. 90% of that I cover with a 24-70. The rest I will use 35, 50, 85 primes but that is all secondary lenses that I may use for formal shots/ambient "catch" shots. Sometimes I use the 70-200 as well for the compression it gives for bride and groom. I do use my X100 for ambient shots, but not primary system due to the 35mm lens, not the quality.

    Really lighting is more important than lenses or even a second D800. I would focus on that more than lenses or bodies. If it is an outdoor wedding, you might need to use 2+ flashes through modifiers to get the look. It really depends completely on the location what is needed or desired to do. If you can, take a friend out to the location on a sunny day at about the same time of day as the wedding and make test shots. Then you will know the amount of power and what lighting you will need.

    I would suggest getting a flash modifier when you have the flash on camera. I use a Gary Fong collapsible dome as it stays put, does a good job at diffusing the light and is rarely in the way. I add a 1/4-1/2 CTO (warming) gel to my flash with it. I do not like the "boxes" as they get knocked off, and really block your view, along with going vertical. I don't use a rotating flash bracket at all.

    Sand bags (I use ankle running weight bracelets) for the light stands. (10lbs with 40" umbrellas)

    CTO 1/4 gel sheet, pre cut for flashes. I stack 2-4 gels to get the color I want. More than 1/4 can really turn people orange.

    You might consider radio triggers for the lighting as well. In daylight, the CLS can fail depending on sun angles. Something to think about. I use Phottix Odin system over pocket wizards. Cheaper, and work just as good for 90% of lighting situations.

    Additional flash - I picked up a Phottix mitros for Nikon ($300ish) and it works just as good as my sb900s. A lot cheaper and just as well built.
    D800, D300, D50(ir converted), FujiX100, Canon G11, Olympus TG2. Nikon lenses - 24mm 2.8, 35mm 1.8, (5 in all)50mm, 60mm, 85mm 1.8, 105vr, 105 f2.5, 180mm 2.8, 70-200vr1, 24-120vr f4. Tokina 12-24mm, 16-28mm, 28-70mm (angenieux design), 300mm f2.8. Sigma 15mm fisheye. Voigtlander R2 (olive) & R2a, Voigt 35mm 2.5, Zeiss 50mm f/2, Leica 90mm f/4. I know I missed something...
  • PhotobugPhotobug Posts: 4,775Member
    This has been terrific reading with tons of great input. Msmoto, great post. Although I don't do weddings (although I did one 20 years ago) it's great reading to better understand what people are doing.

    What I want to share is from a wedding 2 months ago and 4 years ago. Recently we went to a wedding and there was a party for the out of town guest the night before the wedding. As a friend of the parents of the bride, I asked the bride if I could shoot pictures at the party. Did 80 pictures with a one week old D7100 + 17-55mm + SB800 with diffusion dome installed. Not recommended...know your equivalent. Got terrific single and group shots of everyone at the party. The pro photographer was not around. Turned out the bride and her parents loved my shots. Yes, I was rewarded for my efforts. This is often an overlooked opportunity for the pro photographer.

    The day of the wedding checked out the wedding and reception location about 2 hours before the event. Just before the wedding the father of the bride ask that I shoot a video of the wedding on my new camera. Guess who had maybe 5 minutes of experience shooting video. Results, okay but nothing to get excited about. I took a few single shots after I stopped video work and had planned to sit down with the wife and enjoy the wedding. Between the wedding and reception the mother of the bride and then the bride approached me and pleaded with me to shoot lots of pictures. Then the father of the bride asked me to shoot lots of pictures. Seems friends of the brides encouraged them if they have anyone talking pictures with good equipment to take pictures, they get pictures the pros miss. I did not have any prime lens or my favorite 70-200 F2.8 with me, they were in the hotel room.

    So over the next 3 hours I took lots of pictures and even had spare batteries for my SB800. Bottom line, when the family of the bride and the bride & groom saw my pictures 9 days later they loved them. Seems many of mine were better :D and I caught the crowd and interactions better than the paid pro. I was always respectful to the pro, stayed out of his shots and did not hold him up. It was kind of funny when I would pull certain people together for pictures the pro was running over to get the shot I set-up. My wife just laughed at what was going on, especially the last 30 minutes of the recption.

    My observations from watching the pro:
    --He used one Canon body and two lens and one flash. Did not see a bag or case with other equipment.
    --It was fun watching him juggle lens between shots. You got to have two DSLR bodies.
    --He was using an inexpensive flash bracket to hold the flash above the camera. Twice he had to stop to tighten adjustment wheels on the gear.
    He should have been using the RRS flash bracket. These are terrific and they have a couple different styles to keep that flash centered over the lens.
    --He wore a suit and had tennis shoes on. UGLY!!! but functional.
    --He had problems kneeling on one knee to take pictures. Who ever said it, you got to be fit is so true.
    --He seems to be always late for standard shots: Cake (I had the best location & angle), father - bride shot, first dance with groom, etc.
    --He missed a critical shot I got when he stopped to switch lens and memory cards. Dah!
    --He did use a helper for 15 minutes to hold a flash on a pole, then the helper disappeared.
    --He missed the boat with all the dancing. He stood on an elevated table 25 feet away taking the big picture shot. He took nothing close. Where was I...started on the edge of the dance floor and then moved onto dance floor taking individual and small group shots getting expressions of the bride, bridal party, and then the other people. As it turned out, the bride and parents of the bride loved these shots.

    Four years ago....the photographer was well organized, two camera bodies and later I found out he had a 3rd for backup in his case. He had RRS flash brackets, Nikon 24-70mm, 50mm, and 70-200mm lens in action. Kept switching bodies when he needed different lens. Helper took some informal pictures. He kept referring to a shooting list and everything went smoothly. When he was shooting outside shots and his assistance was working lights and shooting second body of individuals or adjusting lights. He also thanked me for not taking pictures with my D300+SB800 when he was doing his outside shots, since my flash triggering his lights. I shot after he did and when his lamps went off, I was surprised I just stopped and waited for him to do his job.

    Thought many of you would enjoy this feedback and draw out the useful suggestions.
    D750 & D7100 | 24-70 F2.8 G AF-S ED, 70-200 F2.8 AF VR, TC-14E III, TC-1.7EII, 35 F2 AF D, 50mm F1.8G, 105mm G AF-S VR | Backup & Wife's Gear: D5500 & Sony HX50V | 18-140 AF-S ED VR DX, 55-300 AF-S G VR DX |
    |SB-800, Amaran Halo LED Ring light | MB-D16 grip| Gitzo GT3541 + RRS BH-55LR, Gitzo GM2942 + Sirui L-10 | RRS gear | Lowepro, ThinkTank, & Hoodman gear | BosStrap | Vello Freewave Plus wireless Remote, Leica Lens Cleaning Cloth |
  • Vipmediastar_JZVipmediastar_JZ Posts: 1,708Member
    Good find gold. Learned some stuff but i dought ill use fish eye. I liked his pics and angles.

    Pretty much with what everybody is saying
    Is to have two d800 one with a 24-70 and one with 70-200 2.8

    @photobug the alien bee you can put a cord to disable other flashes from triggering them and will only fire with sync cord or remote triggers.
  • Rx4PhotoRx4Photo Posts: 1,200Member
    edited November 2013
    Speaking of the video that Golf posted (thanks man) he states that he shoots with a D300S yet his favorite fisheye is the Sigma 15mm on it because the 10mm causes more curvature of the ground and surrounding scenery. This is something that I noticed in a couple of reviews of the Nikon 16mm fisheye. Some reviewers stated that they also prefer to use the Nikkor 16mm fish on a DX body for the very same reasons.

    I think "creative" is what people thirst for now more than the past. Sure you have to get the traditional safe shots but to capture an image that makes a few say "WOW" is what's going to make people remember you.
    Post edited by Rx4Photo on
    D800 | D7000 | Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 | 24-70mm f/2.8 | 70-200mm f/2.8 | 35mm f/1.8G | 85mm f/1.4G | Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM | Zeiss 100mm Makro-Planar ZF.2 | Flash controllers: Phottix Odin TTL

  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    I have a feeling that most of the images shot with a fish-eye, at a wedding, will have some cropping done to them in order to reduce the about of distortion within in the image. Looking at Gene Ho wedding portfolio I can see them for myself.
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member

    Pretty much with what everybody is saying
    Is to have two d800 one with a 24-70 and one with 70-200 2.8
    Hmm I think you need to be very comfortable with who you are as a photographer.

    I mean, don't have two cameras each with heavy f/2.8 lenses hanging around your neck all day at a wedding if you don't normally shoot that way, just because people on the internets tell you that's the way to go. I personally would not follow such an approach. I did a ton of events this year and juggling two DSLRs at the same time would drive me nuts.

    I know a great wedding photographer who shoots with a fast prime on her camera, and another prime in her bag. She has one flash she almost never uses, a backup/laptop bag tucked away, and that's basically it. It's her style and she's very successful at it.

    Rather than spending money on gear rental, I might suggest finding an experienced second shooter who can complement the way your work. E.g., when you're taking detail closeups, the 2nd shooter can take wide shots. When you're shooting straight down the aisle, he/she can take a side angle. When you're concentrating on the bride & groom, the 2nd shooter can be cover the guests. Etc.

    Having a 2nd shooter reduces your burden (and stress levels), covers all the bases, and lessens the need to carry/juggle a ton of gear by yourself.
  • TaoTeJaredTaoTeJared Posts: 1,306Member
    @Photobug - yep that seems to be both extremes of the gamut of photographers out there. Also probably speaks to how much people are willing to spend on one. I do weddings very rarely but I have been to enough to know they are all different and having a list is key. No matter what the event is, I always have a "List" written down, and check it off - and I mean every shot. Sometimes that list is 40, sometimes it is 150. I direct everyone as much as possible for the "list" and if I miss a shot, I do ask for them to do a similar action so I can get it. I missed a cake cutting once because the bride and grooms daughter blew bubbles into my lens. Sometimes you just have to suck it up, pick your pride up and say you need a better shot. Never had anyone turn it down - and anymore, I'll do a second "set-up" shot since they turn out better. Oh and I'll ware black/brown sneakers (nice looking and very muted)- sorry but after 1 back surgery and having slipped too many times with dress shoes, it's a safety issue for me. I do make sure they are unnoticeable/barely noticeable with a suit.

    I would agree with Ade about having 2 bodies swinging if you are not use to it. I almost always shoot with just one body with a belt and 2-3 pouches (skin pouches from ThinkTank) and swap lenses. It is all about knowing/predicting what will happen next or being able to direct it. Most of that is the "list" in chronological order of the day. I will have my X100 sometimes but usually a second body smacks something, and then I'm paying attention to what it will hit, rather than about taking photos. Some are comfortable with it - to each their own.
    D800, D300, D50(ir converted), FujiX100, Canon G11, Olympus TG2. Nikon lenses - 24mm 2.8, 35mm 1.8, (5 in all)50mm, 60mm, 85mm 1.8, 105vr, 105 f2.5, 180mm 2.8, 70-200vr1, 24-120vr f4. Tokina 12-24mm, 16-28mm, 28-70mm (angenieux design), 300mm f2.8. Sigma 15mm fisheye. Voigtlander R2 (olive) & R2a, Voigt 35mm 2.5, Zeiss 50mm f/2, Leica 90mm f/4. I know I missed something...
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    edited November 2013
    This has turned into a great thread. Thanks again. As I do not shoot weddings professionally, but did shoot my son's wedding while being in it at the same time, I chose the D4 and 24mm f/1.4 for everything, no flash.

    In 1965, I learned wedding photography from Fonville Winans

    http://www.fonvillewinans.com/Fonville/About.aspx

    who was shooting on a Nikon F almost all available light at that time. Thus, when I did the snapshots for my son and daughter in law, I went with one lens, and shot almost everything with that.

    FYI, my snapshots:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/fantinesfotos/sets/72157631859730867/
    Post edited by Msmoto on
    Msmoto, mod
  • Vipmediastar_JZVipmediastar_JZ Posts: 1,708Member
    Good advice from everybody.
    I am very happy and comfortable with sigma 35 and nikon 85mm
    Those two are my favorites that I own.
    Good advice on the weight issues I forgot to consider that.
    Once I get all the details for the event ill plan it out.

    As for an expereinced second shooter you are spot on with that. I will have my sister with me assisting and I will start teaching her photography but I am not expecting to use her besides the "studio" of they decide to get that.

    The event is 6 months away so there is plenty to learn on both our sides and plan the event.
    Im going with my gut to have my d800 with 35mm on the black rapid strap and the other d800 with 70-200 ready to go.

    Unless the bridal party is very large i will skip the 14-24 and i decide to rent less and now the rental price is half.

    I


  • MikeGunterMikeGunter Posts: 543Member
    Hi all,

    @ Photobug - A suit is a good thing, and there are plenty of tennis shoes that don't look like tennis shoes - plain black that take a shine and don't stand out in the crowd.

    I recommend wearing knee pads under the pants for kneeling on rough surfaces. It will making getting up and down much easier for any age - that is from someone with several years of combat experience. I carry some in my bag - I highly recommend them. ;-)

    The luxury of more than one body allows long/short/medium shots, but then you'd also want more than one tripod and have those setups planned, too. Having a plan allows the photographer a strategy to make his/her shots or even vary from the plan.

    An assistant to help is really something that one should budget for, but then that doesn't always work out. Hence one would add worry to those tripods with cameras left alone with small children wandering what they are and can they hold the weight of 2 three-year-olds or 1 six-year-old. It becomes vexing.

    From your comments, it sounded more like a pronounced lack of coordination with the bridal party as well as a few short comings from the photographer. He might be a relative newcomer to the game, or even someone who hasn't really invested much in his craft, or he might specialize in Little League sports shoots or something that is just not weddings.

    About 10 years ago my godson asked to borrow my video equipment to tape some friends' wedding and his father was the officiant, I asked who was doing the photography and was told that it was the uncle of the wedding party. I knew both families and took my kit. ;-)

    Since I rode with my godson and his father we got there early, the bride asked us if anyone had a camera as the uncle arrived without his.

    That was the 35th or so wedding I shot that year (I was retired then, too). I don't generally do weddings. The guy could have been pressed in to service rather late in the game.

    My best,

    Mike
  • PhotobugPhotobug Posts: 4,775Member
    MikeGunter..great advise, never thought of this:

    I recommend wearing knee pads under the pants for kneeling on rough surfaces. It will making getting up and down much easier for any age - that is from someone with several years of combat experience. I carry some in my bag - I highly recommend them

    I remember on vacation with two film camera around my neck. I was always trying to avoid the two colliding. I can't believe a wedding pro using two cameras around his neck.

    Agree with TaoTeJared on his analysis of my message. He did look inexperienced.

    D750 & D7100 | 24-70 F2.8 G AF-S ED, 70-200 F2.8 AF VR, TC-14E III, TC-1.7EII, 35 F2 AF D, 50mm F1.8G, 105mm G AF-S VR | Backup & Wife's Gear: D5500 & Sony HX50V | 18-140 AF-S ED VR DX, 55-300 AF-S G VR DX |
    |SB-800, Amaran Halo LED Ring light | MB-D16 grip| Gitzo GT3541 + RRS BH-55LR, Gitzo GM2942 + Sirui L-10 | RRS gear | Lowepro, ThinkTank, & Hoodman gear | BosStrap | Vello Freewave Plus wireless Remote, Leica Lens Cleaning Cloth |
  • TaoTeJaredTaoTeJared Posts: 1,306Member
    I recommend wearing knee pads under the pants for kneeling on rough surfaces. It will making getting up and down much easier for any age - that is from someone with several years of combat experience. I carry some in my bag - I highly recommend them. ;-)
    Have to ask, 10 sets of knee pads later and never satisfied, have you found a preference of kind or brand?
    D800, D300, D50(ir converted), FujiX100, Canon G11, Olympus TG2. Nikon lenses - 24mm 2.8, 35mm 1.8, (5 in all)50mm, 60mm, 85mm 1.8, 105vr, 105 f2.5, 180mm 2.8, 70-200vr1, 24-120vr f4. Tokina 12-24mm, 16-28mm, 28-70mm (angenieux design), 300mm f2.8. Sigma 15mm fisheye. Voigtlander R2 (olive) & R2a, Voigt 35mm 2.5, Zeiss 50mm f/2, Leica 90mm f/4. I know I missed something...
  • sevencrossingsevencrossing Posts: 2,800Member
    edited November 2013
    re knee pads _ I use Snickers Non-Slip Knee Pad Inserts, they fit in the knee pocket, of your builders pants , might look a bit odd at a wedding :) but you could sew them inside your pants; (the ones with straps tend to move too much ) I have not tried these but the Vulkan Padded Knee Support looks good

    re: Two cameras, I use the Black rapid double, it can be split to make a single
    Post edited by sevencrossing on
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    Knee pads…..yup!

    Thanks for all the great suggestions…..
    Msmoto, mod
  • sevencrossingsevencrossing Posts: 2,800Member
    Replacing knee pads is quick, easy and cheap. Replacing you knees is difficult and expensive; you will out of action for some time
  • MikeGunterMikeGunter Posts: 543Member
    Hi all,

    I use Asics Knee pads. There are several models, I get the most padded version. At the end of the day, they pinch a bit, but I'd rather have that than have my knees rattle at me.

    If one is in not in the public eye, I would also recommend a rubbery construction knee protection available at a builder's supply. I use them when out about over my jeans. Look terrible, but then I'm not out to impress.

  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    The gel filled contractor's knee pads are very nice. One can be crawling around for hours without developing problems or discomfort. And, for those who are chronologically more mature (born in the 1930's or 40's), the knee pads are even more important.
    Msmoto, mod
  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • AdeAde Posts: 1,071Member
    edited January 2014
    I think Nasim tabulated once that Lola shot 90% of her wedding pictures using the 50/1.4G, a lens many love to loath in this forum.
    Post edited by Ade on
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