Battery Grip Advantages?

Swame_spSwame_sp Posts: 58Member
edited December 2012 in Nikon DSLR cameras
Hey friendly forum members...

Happy New Year wishes!!!

I have D7000 and been having immense fun with it. I'm venturing into other areas of photography that I have never tried before like product photography and night photography...etc

I saw my friend using a batter grip on his canon 5D m2. I was wondering how many of you use it all the time. Apart from the comfort to the hands and easy portrait mode, what are the advantages that you have? Looking to see if should even buy one. Is worth the buck?

Thanks!!
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Comments

  • JJ_SOJJ_SO Posts: 1,158Member
    I can hold the camera steadier, even in landscape mode. Other side is, it is an additional factor of lack of stability when using a tripod. Although the genuine Nikon grips are made of metal, the camera seems to move a bit more when mounted on a tripod and mirror pre-release was forgotten or not possible.

    The additional function elements are a also a big help for me.
  • RatatoskrRatatoskr Posts: 32Member
    edited December 2012
    I don't know any other than my MB-D12 Battery Pack (except for my old FE2) so can only comment on it.

    It's not made of metal but instead it's made of polycarbonate.

    The advantages are of course, among other, portrait holding and more steady handling of the camera.
    In my case there is NO disadvantage when using a monopod/tripod. I always mount my mono/tripod directly on the lens.

    Other advantages of mine to my camera is it increases my FPS. Though it's not much of an increase in FPS it still increases my chances of getting that elusive moment of wildlife action. Another bonus is that I can use AA batteries in case I can't charge my Nikon batteries, for ex on wildlife expedition to remote areas. The battery pack of course also gives me much more time to photograph consecutively without having to change battery, ie twice as long time of course. Important for me out in the wild where a blink can have me miss that special moment.

    AFAIK there are good third party ones available that won't cost you the enormous amount of money that Nikon's (mine at least) costs. There were no other choices for me when I got mine and I was in a hurry.
    Pixel Vertax D12 is probably a much better choice unless you are rich, and I would have got it if I had bought one today.
    Post edited by Ratatoskr on
    Man's heart away from nature becomes hard. - Standing Bear
    It has yet to be proven that intelligence has any survival value. - Arthur C. Clarke
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 197
    edited December 2012
    I like a grip bolted on to my camera bodies as I feel that I can hold them steadier - simple as that. I don't think I have particularly monster hands, but I do feel more comfortable using a grip. (I simply cannot hold small compact cameras still)

    I'm not interested in FPS either - or the added battery power for long shooting sessions.

    I've used third party grips and they're ok - although I have heard of some giving funny indications (no battery for example) - Nikon seem to have been taking a leaf out of the RRS price list judging by what they're asking for the MB-D12...I seem to remember the PDK1 for the D700 was about the same price but with loads of other bits and pieces.(As it happens, I also own the MB-D12)

    Last but not least, as RATATOSKR has previously mentioned, they can be a great help if you have problems charging - just slide in a set of AA cells.
    Post edited by [Deleted User] on
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,452Moderator
    I had one on my D90 for the same reasons as darkslide, but for my D7000 I will not get one because of the faff of removing it to put one battery in the camera and the other in the grip.  Ridiculous IMHO.
    Always learning.
  • TaoTeJaredTaoTeJared Posts: 1,306Member
    I love them, and am missing one on my D800 bad at the moment - which since they have dropped in price I will be getting one soon.  My battery pack lives on my D300 and hasn't came off in probably 6 months.  

    Shooting verticals I find it almost a necessity for ergonomics.  They do also, as others have said, help steady the camera with larger lenses and the added weight does help "calm" movement down.  That is probably the two largest reasons I like them.

    If you are doing a full day shoot - it is comforting knowing that you don't have to change batteries.  If I am doing studio work or landscapes, I do usually take it off though.  Although my ball head handles it fine (rated for 35lbs), the added height can cause the weight to be off center just a bit more.  If you use a large tripod this is not an issue but I don't.
    D800, D300, D50(ir converted), FujiX100, Canon G11, Olympus TG2. Nikon lenses - 24mm 2.8, 35mm 1.8, (5 in all)50mm, 60mm, 85mm 1.8, 105vr, 105 f2.5, 180mm 2.8, 70-200vr1, 24-120vr f4. Tokina 12-24mm, 16-28mm, 28-70mm (angenieux design), 300mm f2.8. Sigma 15mm fisheye. Voigtlander R2 (olive) & R2a, Voigt 35mm 2.5, Zeiss 50mm f/2, Leica 90mm f/4. I know I missed something...
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,403Member
    I use them all the time on all my bodies because they make vertical shooting more comfortable.    
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    The ergonomics are much improved, especially if one shoots portraits on the street.  I would not have a body with out the portrait grip.
    Msmoto, mod
  • SkintBritSkintBrit Posts: 79Member
    I always have a grip on my D700. Asides from the very useful and significant 3 FPS increase, it also more than triples my battery life, very useful when shooting a wedding or stage production.
    D3s's D700 F100 / Trinity 2.8 Zooms & 1.4 Primes / 105 micro. SB900s with Pocket Wizard Flex TT5 / Mini TT1s. Camranger remote control system.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,454Member
    I like using battery grips, if I am shooting at lot of vertical shots. I find the primary reason to use one is for faster FPS on the D700 and D300, which I use a single MB-D10 on interchangeable.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • FrauchaFraucha Posts: 10Member
    I have one on my D300s, it stays on. I don't yet have one on my D800, but have not decided if it is worth the money. The grip does make the D300s easier to hold for me. 
  • studio460studio460 Posts: 205Member
    edited January 2013
    Although I'd actually prefer a lighter body, they're a must for portrait-mode shooting. I bought an MB-D11 for my D7000, and an MB-D12 for my D800. Though, I wouldn't have even bought either, had I not needed them for paid event work (I never shoot verticals for personal work). I understand some prefer the heftier grip they provide, but if the camera's not working an event, I never have them on the camera. As always, YMMV.
    Post edited by studio460 on
  • DanDan Posts: 6Member
    edited January 2013





    I love the grip on my D700 for all the reasons above. I do have large hands so it feels awkward when I don't have the grip attached. I'm either trying to squeeze all my fingers on to body or have couple hang from the bottom. The grip allows you to spread your fingers out and position your hand more naturally. It also gives you a very positive and safe hold. I don't always use the neck strap and the camera hangs nicely balanced in my hand.


    The only time I remove the grip is when I need to make compromises on what to bring on a trip. Bags don't always fit a "full" body and the ones that do are sometimes too big to carry. The "full" body can also attract unwanted attention in some places.

     

    For me, there are more advantages to having the grip than disadvantages.

    Post edited by Dan on
  • JJ_SOJJ_SO Posts: 1,158Member
    . The "full" body can also attract unwanted attention in some places.

    that's absolutely right. And can sometimes be an advantage. If you want to make clear, you'll gonna start shooting now, a big camera can help persons to identify you as a photographer and move away, if they don't want to be in the picture. It can be a help instead of debating afterwards.
  • KaneKane Posts: 1Member
    I currently have a D7000 camera and just brought the grip. i feel it makes it more comfortable. previously my little finger used to just dangle about and made holding it clumsy. the vertical shooting buttons is a plus and the build quality s good. it works fine on the tripod as well ( 055xprob)

    I have to keep reminding my self that there are buttons on the grip but guess it will come naturally after some use.

    I just use one battery and its in the grip, i find it easier to remove from the grip than the camera, besides one battery last quite long.

    and happy new year to you guys have a healthy 2013.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,452Moderator
    I just use one battery and its in the grip, i find it easier to remove from the grip than the camera, besides one battery last quite long. 

    Stupidly, I had not thought of doing that.  There is still the wobble that one gets when mounting it on a tripod though.
    Always learning.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,454Member
    That is an issue, the grip is a weak point when using a tripod. The only camera that I've been happy using on a tripod with the grip attached is the D300. The MB-D10 just hugs that body with little or no movement. On the D700 there is noticeable flex between the grip and the camera, which is too bad. Just another reason to grab yourself an older used D3 if you use the grip all the time.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • RatatoskrRatatoskr Posts: 32Member
    Have to ask, all of you complaining on problems with grip and tripod. Are you guys mounting the tripod on the grip???
    As I stated earlier I've never had any probs with grip and mono/tripod, quite the contrary I get a much more balanced mount with the grip on. Maybe you are using small, lightweight lenses on the tripod?
    Man's heart away from nature becomes hard. - Standing Bear
    It has yet to be proven that intelligence has any survival value. - Arthur C. Clarke
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,454Member
    You mean, like the 24-70 F2.8? The grip obviously wouldn't be an issue when using lenses with a tripod foot.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,452Moderator
    :bz
    Always learning.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,452Moderator
    Does anybody know which of the non-Nikon grips are the best?
    Always learning.
  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    edited January 2013
    If you are an owner of a D7000, like myself, that added grip will be a welcome addition for you to get. It add's comfort, easy of use and "manlly-ness" 8-}

    Taking off the grip and putting it back on take less than 10 sec...it really is not that big of a deal. And I would not go with a third party.
    Post edited by Golf007sd on
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • RatatoskrRatatoskr Posts: 32Member
    spraynpray:
    Why you answer with a ridiculous animation?
    Just give a straight answer, unless you are just making up everything you say.

    Man's heart away from nature becomes hard. - Standing Bear
    It has yet to be proven that intelligence has any survival value. - Arthur C. Clarke
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,454Member
    @Golf007sd it is true that you can quickly remove the grip, but if one uses the grip on a regular basis that would making the use Arca-Swiss type camera plates a pain.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • Golf007sdGolf007sd Posts: 2,840Moderator
    edited January 2013
    PB_PM How so mate? The Arca-Swiss attaches to the battery grip via the tripod screw mount. The battery grip itself mounts to the D7000 body via a twisted-nob that screws to the base of the tripod mount on the main camera. Turn the nob on the battery grip and the whole battery grips comes off, with the Arce-Swiss attached mind you, in the same amount of time. At least that is the way it works on my RRS L-plate for the D7K with battery grips. 

    Lastly, the battery on the D7000 has a very long life, I have only once drained the battery grip all the way down before the unit started to use the main one on the inside body. I have my D7000 configured that it obtains it's power from the grip first and then go to the body itself.

    Lastly, the only time I take the grip off, is ever other charge when I rotate the batteries in order to get a good long life out of the two batteries. 

    Edit: Or are you referring to the idea that one only puts the grip on as one needs it? If that is the case I see your point. However, I never take the batter grip off the D7000. It is always attached.
    Post edited by Golf007sd on
    D4 & D7000 | Nikon Holy Trinity Set + 105 2.8 Mico + 200 F2 VR II | 300 2.8G VR II, 10.5 Fish-eye, 24 & 50 1.4G, 35 & 85 1.8G, 18-200 3.5-5.6 VR I SB-400 & 700 | TC 1.4E III, 1.7 & 2.0E III, 1.7 | Sigma 35 & 50 1.4 DG HSM | RRS Ballhead & Tripods Gear | Gitzo Monopod | Lowepro Gear | HDR via Promote Control System |
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,454Member
    As mentioned before, the grips often have some flex, so I prefer to use the body only for tripod work. I don't have a plate for the grip, and don't plan to get one. Thus each time I want to use a tripod I have remove the grip and attach the camera plate.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
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