To Grip or not to Grip D800/800E/D810

paulrpaulr Posts: 1,176Member
edited January 2015 in D6x0/D7x0/D8x0
Having recently acquired a D810 I personally found the camera quite light and a little nose heavy when a lens was fitted. The cost of a Nikon Grip is not cheap, so a careful decision must be made. Upside is a more balance camera body/ lens, far better battery life and if needed more frames /second.
I also had a D4 battery available which helped me decide.So next question is do you buy the genuine Nikon grip or third party? I went for the genuine one and after checking various sources on the internet which reduced the cost.
So did you bother with a Grip or are happy just to use the D8----- solo.
Camera, Lens and Tripod and a few other Bits
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Comments

  • sevencrossingsevencrossing Posts: 2,800Member
    edited January 2015
    An interesting topic
    On the mirrorless threads everyone is hoping for a lighter DSLR
    yet here we are, with someone wanting to make their camera heavier
    My suggestion, wait a few weeks and see if you get use to it
    I have a D800 and have never had to change batteries in just one day
    That might be different if you use live view a lot
    Post edited by sevencrossing on
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    edited January 2015
    Manufacturer of the grip: I only use the genuine ones. I'd consider other manufacturers only, if they'd make a better one. Most of them focus to make it cheaper. Better to me means
    stiffer
    with Arca style bottom plate
    remote connector (infrared or cable)
    DC input (other than the extra accessory)
    WiFi, since the cam comes without.
    Clearly, no one will make such a thing. Too specific and also quite expensive, so too small market volume. I know, most of these desires could be addressed with additional stuff. At more costs and with more used volume in my photobag and more time needed to mount that stuff.

    I found myself using my D810 a lot without the grip. It adds weight and gives some extra comfort at portrait mode shots, but it's decreasing the stability on a tripod and carrying the camera with lens upside down I feel some movement even after tightening the screw to the max.

    Most people understand the grip won't make the camera lighter - so why not consequently use thicker walls? The thin wally plus the "one screw only" mounting makes the whole thing a little bit wobbly on a tripod. No wonder, most AF-adjustment tools recommend a setup without this grip. And since the knobs and dials are not exactly behaving the same as those on the cam - at least they feel stiffer and less easy to use - I find it harder to name very good reasons for that grip. Any grip for a D810.
    Post edited by funtagraph on
  • MsmotoMsmoto Posts: 5,396Moderator
    I have a D800E, and as I purchased this "pre-owned" with an RRS right angle bracket, I do not want to add a grip, $439.0o, plus another $190.00 for the RRS "L Plate". Or, $629??????

    I find I can use this just like I have used others in the past, by simply rotating the camera and reaching over the top to release the shutter. At least for $629 I can.... :))
    Msmoto, mod
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,191Member
    I have a D800 with the Nikon grip and RRS "L Plates" for both the grip and the camera. To Msmoto's point - $.

    The grip is always on, except when I go on vacation when I take it off. It then feels like my Coolpix A.

    I have never used both batteries in a day, but I often use more than one and I seldom use Liveview.
  • KillerbobKillerbob Posts: 732Member
    I recently got the D810, in addition to my D800, and I moved the grip from the D800 to the D810. I have an RRS L-plate on the D810, and a Capture Arca plate on the D800.

    As for what I like to hold most, it is definitely the D810 with the grip, Even with the L-plate, I find it just fits better in my hands. I like the vertical controls on the grip, and I actually find it easier to use with tripod and monopod.

    Sure the FPS go up and the added battery is nice, but I haven't taken real advantage of that yet.
  • HammieHammie Posts: 258Member
    Although I do not have an 8xx model, I will be getting a grip. I feel the D750 is light... lighter than my D300. I had the Nikon OEM grip on my D300. I tried a third party grip for the D750 and quickly realized it is not the same as a Nikon grip. However, since the Nikon grip is not available, I am hoping that it is more in line with the D300 grip than the plasticy thing that I received previously.
  • paulrpaulr Posts: 1,176Member
    edited January 2015
    seven crossing I think its what you get used to, in the last six years the D3, D3X and then the D4 were my working cameras, normally with either a 24-70 or a 14-24 lens most of the time. I bought a V3 but found that way too light now sold . I have to work sometimes with quite slow shutter speeds and find a more heavier camera better. Now I have the Grip on d810 it just feels more natural to me.
    I think its just a personal thing and what you get used to.
    Post edited by paulr on
    Camera, Lens and Tripod and a few other Bits
  • snakebunksnakebunk Posts: 889Member
    I bought the Nikon grip with my D800. Thought it would make me take more portrait pictures. But the truth is I have never used it and I don't miss it.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,122Member
    That does sound bad. Not like the older MB-D10 that has severed me well with the D300 and D700. Sad to see the quality control dropping off.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    Sorry, quality control can't make a weak design a strong one. Best solution in terms of grip is a D4. Anything else, at least these days, is designed to pull money out of our pockets. They don't add the value they cost. There are exceptions, like the one for D750 MB-D16 which is nice and compact, but MB-D12? I don't recommend getting one.
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,191Member
    Sorry, quality control can't make a weak design a strong one. Best solution in terms of grip is a D4. Anything else, at least these days, is designed to pull money out of our pockets. They don't add the value they cost. There are exceptions, like the one for D750 MB-D16 which is nice and compact, but MB-D12? I don't recommend getting one.
    Do you shoot more portraits or landscapes?
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    edited January 2015
    App. ⅓ portrait orientation. And you?

    Does my preferred orientation has anything to do with my opinion, Nikon could improve those grips? I still own two and sold two others with the bodies, so I think I know what I'm talking of. And the fact that the copies of MB-D12 are even weaker than the original doesn't mean the original is approcaching perfection. In fact, putting a grip between the body and a nice, probably expensive tripod head gives a noticeable wobble to the whole system. And if I'm using the tripod frequently I keep myself asking "why couldn't they have done it properly?" I think, a valid question at this price (when counting an extra L-plate to it)
    Post edited by funtagraph on
  • kanuckkanuck Posts: 1,300Member
    Good topic Paulr. Adding a grip definitely improves the handling of the camera and it increases the frames per second as well. However, I do not like the extra weight especially once you start mounting the 2.8 glass "free weights". If I wanted or needed this extra weight I am certain that I would simply just buy a pro-line D3 series or D4 body. I purchased the MB-D10 for my D300 and then D700 about 6 years ago for $450. Shot with it for about 3 months then promptly sold it to a local pro shop in Seoul for $200 after traveling, hiking and working in the field with it. Again, I love the big pro sized bodies in terms of their ruggedness and handling, but I would rather buy one outright than add a grip to a per-existing body system. I have the D810 now with RRS L plate...
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,191Member
    App. ⅓ portrait orientation. And you?

    Does my preferred orientation has anything to do with my opinion, Nikon could improve those grips? I still own two and sold two others with the bodies, so I think I know what I'm talking of. And the fact that the copies of MB-D12 are even weaker than the original doesn't mean the original is approcaching perfection. In fact, putting a grip between the body and a nice, probably expensive tripod head gives a noticeable wobble to the whole system. And if I'm using the tripod frequently I keep myself asking "why couldn't they have done it properly?" I think, a valid question at this price (when counting an extra L-plate to it)
    I probably shoot a similar amount as you or possibly half. You can look through my account in my signature. Look through the whole thing, as it is extremely portrait heavy in the first couple of pages which is misleading.

    I shoot a D800 with the MB-D12 and an RRS L-plate nearly permanently attached. The only time I take it off is when I travel and am carry a full load of gear possibly including a tripod all day. On those days I use the RRS L-plate for the D800. I use the RRS BH-55 ballhead exclusively.

    I have never had an issue with the quality of the grip and I feel the connection with the tripod is quite solid. It is possible that prior grips have somehow been better, but I have no complaints with mine and I really like it.

    It makes a huge difference when I am shooting in portrait mode. I might shoot a thousand shots during a long day of shooting portraits and 90% of them will be in portrait mode. Without the grip, my arm is sore, especially my wrist. The grip fixes all that.

    My health is valuable to me and frankly, if I had to replace the MB-D12 every year, I would bite the bullet and do it. I don't want to ruin my arm or wrist. Moving forward, the lack of availability of the grip, either included like the D4s or as an add on like the D800, will disqualify said camera from being my primary camera (I can live without the grip in something like the DF, which is a lightweight travel/street camera in my mind.

    So no, your preferred orientation does not have anything to do with your quality concerns as far as the camera is concerned, but it might as far as your health is concerned.
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,236Moderator
    edited January 2015
    My angle is that I have never bought a grip because I need the help it offers when taking portrait shots - only ever to improve the balance and handling of the camera generally (i.e. it helped me get all of my fingers on the grip of a smaller body). Fortunately I don't have any issues regarding bending my wrist at all and for the record, I have had - and posted about - wobbling between the grip and the body so @funtagraph's post is pretty much dead on for me too in that regard.
    Post edited by spraynpray on
    Always learning.
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    @WestEndFoto All valid points. Now, I ask you which weight balance you feel in your hands? When I'm shooting portraits, the right hand has nearly no weight to hold, as I'm releasing the camera with it - that goes for grip or without it. The most weight rests in the palm of the left hand and that one holds the lens. The grip increases the weight for that hand. Same goes for landscape. I do enjoy the grip resting on the ankle of the left hand, but again, it's not the right hand carrying all weight or most of it.

    Huge lenses like 14-24, 50/1.4 Art or even the 24-105 Art bring more weight on the left hand and also some torsion for the ankle of the right hand. Look at the right hand in portrait mode and take away the left hand. I'm sure we both can hold the camera longer than without grip, but is it a natural feeling position? I don't feel it that way. But I have no choice.

    Speaking of health, the grips - all Nikon grips - have in general one flaw. Look at the grip of movie cams: None of them has a vertical orientation (like a spotmeter) and all of them are nearly horizontally so your hand is inline with your arm. That's ergonomics to me - under this aspect only, the Nikon grips are crap and can give your ankle a stress syndrome.

    It would look weird, this ergonomically correct grip.
    It would cause a lot of other problems, like tripod mount becomes difficult and L-plates useless
    But you can put some weight into the right hand too, because without any bending the weight goes directly into the stronger arm bone. So, I would jump on it any time and wouldn't care if its' made of Nikon or some other manufacturer.

    That's what I mean:

    image
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    @WestEndFoto I just went to the RRS shop and had a look on that BMBD12-L810 (or L800, doesn't matter). No wonder you don't feel the combination wobbling as the L-plate is touching the left side of the camera and is acting as a stiffening element. Try to put it into this position
    image
    And check again for wobbling.

    It doesn't matter. the wobble, if I use mirror up or the electronic first curtain, it's just no solid connection, like @Spraynpray pointed out, too.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 2,030Member
    Said if before but all the Neewer grips for D800 and D7100 have given electrical problems...I still use them but pull out the electrical connector and carry a spare battery / AAs for the flash or tracker inside ( in case of theft).
    Never use a tripod.
  • paulrpaulr Posts: 1,176Member
    PitchBlack, Thanks for the warning I will ensure I do not over tighten when I use it on a tripod. I find it strange that secondhand genuine Nikon Grips seem to fetch the same price as new ones circa £200 +. yet you can buy genuine Nikon grips for just over £200 00 if you search the internet. so not a lot of depreciation.
    Camera, Lens and Tripod and a few other Bits
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,191Member
    @WestEndFoto All valid points. Now, I ask you which weight balance you feel in your hands? When I'm shooting portraits, the right hand has nearly no weight to hold, as I'm releasing the camera with it - that goes for grip or without it. The most weight rests in the palm of the left hand and that one holds the lens. The grip increases the weight for that hand. Same goes for landscape. I do enjoy the grip resting on the ankle of the left hand, but again, it's not the right hand carrying all weight or most of it.

    Huge lenses like 14-24, 50/1.4 Art or even the 24-105 Art bring more weight on the left hand and also some torsion for the ankle of the right hand. Look at the right hand in portrait mode and take away the left hand. I'm sure we both can hold the camera longer than without grip, but is it a natural feeling position? I don't feel it that way. But I have no choice.

    Speaking of health, the grips - all Nikon grips - have in general one flaw. Look at the grip of movie cams: None of them has a vertical orientation (like a spotmeter) and all of them are nearly horizontally so your hand is inline with your arm. That's ergonomics to me - under this aspect only, the Nikon grips are crap and can give your ankle a stress syndrome.

    It would look weird, this ergonomically correct grip.
    It would cause a lot of other problems, like tripod mount becomes difficult and L-plates useless
    But you can put some weight into the right hand too, because without any bending the weight goes directly into the stronger arm bone. So, I would jump on it any time and wouldn't care if its' made of Nikon or some other manufacturer.

    That's what I mean:

    image
    You have certainly thought through grips.

    I hold the lens in the angle of my left hand and keep it mostly vertical. There is very little weight on my right hand. It is the twisting that I really want to avoid. I spend all day on a computer and I am careful that I hold my arms and hands a certain way or I get carpal tunnel syndrome, which is easy to correct but annoying and possibly damaging in the long term.

    My heaviest lenses are my 14-24 and 200mm f/4.0. The weight has not bothered me with those.

    It would be nice to get rid of portrait orientation all together, which would require a square sensor. It would be easy with mirrorless, but I don't think I want to give that up. To do it with a DSLR, Nikon would have to redesign the mirror box and add an OVF.

    Not sure I have answered your point?
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,191Member
    @WestEndFoto I just went to the RRS shop and had a look on that BMBD12-L810 (or L800, doesn't matter). No wonder you don't feel the combination wobbling as the L-plate is touching the left side of the camera and is acting as a stiffening element. Try to put it into this position
    image
    And check again for wobbling.

    It doesn't matter. the wobble, if I use mirror up or the electronic first curtain, it's just no solid connection, like @Spraynpray pointed out, too.
    The RRS shop in San Luis Obispo? I always wanted to check that out. Nice spot you live in.

    I imagine that it would wobble if you did it that way. Why are you doing it that way? Do you have some sort of clearance issue?
  • funtagraphfuntagraph Posts: 265Member
    Neither have I the L-plate nor access to the real-life shop - what I meant was a bit of a way with my mouse and go to RRS' online shop.

    The point of showing exactly that picture is: It would give YOU an idea what kind of wobble people without L-plate talk about. I already here you saying "get the L-plate!" and my answer will be "why should I buy an expensive L-plate when the solution is so much cheaper: put the wobble grip off" :)

    I also removed the screws of my grips and I understand now, why MB-D12 is so "flexible" and MB-D16 just doesn't feel like fixed with a rubber screw :D 2 mm plastic covering 0.85 mm tin. While MB-D16's metal plate is smaller, stiffer and thicker: 1.05 mm Doesn't look that much, 0.2 mm difference - it's just 23% more thickness. Also, MB-D16 has a pretty thick frame at the open side to let the battery holder in - while MB-D12 is just all the same thickness. MB-D16 its a better design.
  • GjesdalGjesdal Posts: 277Member
    After getting a 3rd party grip for my 7100 I told myself, don't do that again (it drains the batteries), but that I naturally would get a grip (original) when I go full frame. The reason isn't that I run out of power, but hands are too big, after a long day of shooting I often got muscle cramp. The grip on the D810 is awesome and it fits my hand just perfectly. Yesterday I had the GPS on and shot around 600 shots in the zoo and as always I ran out of room on the CF card (awaiting more CF cards....) but power wasn't a problem at all. Think I had 3/4 of power left at the end of the day.
    D810 | D7100 | Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art |Nikon 70-200mm F2.8 G AF-S VRII ED | Nikon 105mm F2.8 AF-S IF-ED VR II Micro | Sigma 17-50 f/2.8 EX DC OS HSM | Sigma 150-500mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Coolpix P6000 IR converted | http://gjesdal.org
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,236Moderator
    Just for fairness: It isn't only third party grips that drain batteries - I had a grip for my D7000 which did the same. I sent it to the Nikon Repair Centre for the usual fast and free repair and it came back fine. It turns out it is a connection problem between the body and grip. Whether it is the same problem with third party grips, one can only guess but I'd bet it is.
    Always learning.
  • ThomasHortonThomasHorton Posts: 323Member
    I have never purchased a grip for any of my DSLRs. I rarely find any advantage, for me, with the extra battery and when I shoot prostrate portrait (that was an interesting auto-correct) I don't find reaching over all that cumbersome.

    I wonder how hard it would be to make a grip with a larger/faster buffer for bursting those RAWs?
    Gear: Camera obscura with an optical device which transmits and refracts light.
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