Why switch to "Z" system?

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  • mhedgesmhedges Posts: 1,412Member
    edited September 2019
    I like the User Modes a lot. They are very handy for me. Never used the Settings Banks but I haven't heard a lot of good things about them.
    Post edited by mhedges on
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,099Member
    I used to use the Settings Banks, and liked them, before the days of the user modes. Until that time it wasn't bad, but the user modes are 100% superior, and far more usable.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
  • PistnbrokePistnbroke Posts: 2,010Member
    I do understand user modes ..the D8xx version works well if you change settings to adjust for the light say at a gig...when you turn the camera off/on it gives you the changed settings. With U1 style it always goes back to the saved settings when you go on/off ….I also would prefer a dial to a menu ..I can look straight at the dial and know I am on U2 for birds say ..min speed 1/500 max is o 3200 etc .I know where I am .
  • mhedgesmhedges Posts: 1,412Member
    RIght thats why I like the user modes so much. You always know what you're getting. I have U1 set for tripod work, U2 for general handheld stuff, and U3 for sports/action. Works great.
  • Capt_SpauldingCapt_Spaulding Posts: 524Member
    Like @mhedges I set up user modes based on the speed of my targets. As a benighted DSLR owner, I have only U1 and U2 so I dedicate U1 to stuff that doesn't move (much) and U2 to stuff that does move (generally pretty quickly). Then I customize the initial settings for situation specific conditions.

    In a sense I guess I do have three modes, because if I'm in A or M whatever settings the camera was on when I last used it are restored when it wakes up in that mode. Not perfect, but it works for some things.
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,157Member
    Infrared photography is a reason to switch to the Z system. The focussing works way better. When the Z6 Mark 2 comes out I will buy a Z6 Mark 1 and convert it to infrared.
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,117Member
    Has anyone tried the Z50? I think there's still an argument to DX DSLRs for at least the next year or two as there really aren't any compelling Z mount DX lenses. You'd be forced to use the Z to F converter to get all the lenses you want. Hopefully Nikon doesn't repeat what they did with DX F-mount and hobble the camera with lenses we want but never get.
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,157Member
    I think the compact primes in Nikon’s lineup, despite being FX, would be excellent DX primes.

    In the meantime I am waiting for a Z5 to attach to those compact primes.
  • NSXTypeRNSXTypeR Posts: 2,117Member
    edited December 2019

    I think the compact primes in Nikon’s lineup, despite being FX, would be excellent DX primes.



    In the meantime I am waiting for a Z5 to attach to those compact primes.

    I'm sure they're excellent lenses. But the budget Z mount enthusiast buying a DX Z mount camera is not going to be cross shopping Z mount FX primes.

    24mm 1.8- $1000
    85mm 1.8- $800
    35mm 1.8- $700
    50mm 1.8- $500

    When you're on DX, you're going to want wider anyway, so at that point, you may be better served by just staying with FX F mount or Z mount for now as you have more native lens choices and likely faster zooms, whether it be the kit or not.

    Or, just stay with DX DSLRs and get the 18-35mm Sigma zoom.
    Post edited by NSXTypeR on
    Nikon D7000/ Nikon D40/ Nikon FM2/ 18-135 AF-S/ 35mm 1.8 AF-S/ 105mm Macro AF-S/ 50mm 1.2 AI-S
  • spraynprayspraynpray Posts: 6,204Moderator
    My strategy has always been buy FX for normal and longer and DX for wide and ultra wide.
    Always learning.
  • WestEndFotoWestEndFoto Posts: 3,157Member
    NSXTypeR said:

    I think the compact primes in Nikon’s lineup, despite being FX, would be excellent DX primes.



    In the meantime I am waiting for a Z5 to attach to those compact primes.

    I'm sure they're excellent lenses. But the budget Z mount enthusiast buying a DX Z mount camera is not going to be cross shopping Z mount FX primes.

    24mm 1.8- $1000
    85mm 1.8- $800
    35mm 1.8- $700
    50mm 1.8- $500

    When you're on DX, you're going to want wider anyway, so at that point, you may be better served by just staying with FX F mount or Z mount for now as you have more native lens choices and likely faster zooms, whether it be the kit or not.

    Or, just stay with DX DSLRs and get the 18-35mm Sigma zoom.
    This is my "ballpark" prediction what Nikon is going to do, all 2.8s for less than $250, except for maybe the longest and widest:

    28mm FX, or 42mm FX equivalent on DX - already on roadmap
    40mm FX, 60mm FX equivalent on DX - already on roadmap

    Plus:
    35mm FX, or 52mm FX equivalent on DX
    24mm FX, or 36mm FX equivalent on DX,
    20mm FX, or 30mm FX equivalent on DX,
    15mm FX, or 21mm FX equivalent on DX (maybe this is a 3.5),
    50mm FX, or 75mm FX equivalent on DX,
    70mm FX, or 105mm FX equivalent on DX,
    90mm FX, or 135mm FX equivalent on DX,

    That will give budget FX shooters, or people like me that want a Z5 and a small lens set to carry in my attache case even while I work and go to meetings, 9 lenses in the 15-90mm range.

    DX shooters will have a very decent and affordable lens set in the FX equivalent range of 21mm to 135mm.

    That leaves a hole for a wide lens for DX. Nikon might produce a 10mm DX lens with 15mm FX equivalent on DX, or might produce a 10mm FX lens, accomplishing the same objective.

    I think that with this option, there should be nothing holding back a DX shooter that wants small and cheap primes. It also serves the FX shooter that wants the same, like me. A DX version will also not be much smaller than the FX compact primes - recall that they have to fit on a wide lens mount. If you think about where Nikon is in the roadmap and their limited resources, I think that this would be an excellent strategic decision. Further, I cannot come up with a compelling reason to bother producing a separate DX set for such a little gain when other lenses need to be developed, like fast primes, macros, PS and telephotos.

    And consider that all those DX shooters will have FX lenses - they will have a clear upgrade path to an FX camera.
  • Ton14Ton14 Posts: 576Member
    edited December 2019
    I need IBIS and stay with FX, build up my lenses over time, when they are on sale, switch the camera on DX, square etc. and have all the worlds I want. Can even buy small DX lenses.
    Post edited by Ton14 on
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  • DaveyJDaveyJ Posts: 958Member
    I own the Z50 and the two kit lens, which are amazing! But the EVF lag is a real drag. Speed shooting with the Z50s, great as it is, is only ok after the EVF comes on. I use the D7500 and D500 almost everyday when I need speed too! I tried very mirrorless out there I could. I really like the Z6 and the 24-70S f4. But the D500 or even the D7500 and the 16-80, 70-300, and rhe 200-500 f5.6 are in a different league. For straight video, I’d take the Z50. But the D500 and D7500 Video is really quite excellent. The EVF lag is a Boat Anchor!
  • Ton14Ton14 Posts: 576Member
    edited January 31
    The Hi Speed (extended) setting on the Nikon Z6 has no EVF lag, we discussed it in another thread. Be sure that your firmware is the latest. Be also sure that "D11" is set to "ON"



    I don't have the Z50.
    I don't think it can beat the Nikon D850, the Nikon D810 in my case (yet).
    Post edited by Ton14 on
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  • DaveyJDaveyJ Posts: 958Member
    edited February 17
    I have used the D850 for about five minutes. Despite the fact that I love and use the Z50 and the two awesome kit lens, it is NO D850 or even close! The D850 though is no more useful, actually far less useful fir wildlife and sports compared to the spectacular D500. Upgrade that camera and more serious race photographers and wildlife photographers will add the upgrade.,
    Post edited by DaveyJ on
  • tc88tc88 Posts: 386Member
    DaveyJ said:

    The D850 though is no more useful, actually far less useful fir wildlife and sports compared to the spectacular D500.

    Why?
  • Ton14Ton14 Posts: 576Member
    DaveyJ said:

    I have used the D850 for about five minutes. Despite the fact that I love and use the Z50 and the two awesome kit lens, it is NO D850 or even close!

    To find this in 5 minutes, wow. Yes and Why?
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  • DaveyJDaveyJ Posts: 958Member
    edited February 19
    To: tc88 Because I don't know of any race photo pros that use the D850. NONE. D500 totally different. I have used the D850 in a store, B&H and with great lens. But it does not have the DX multiplier effect that makes DX so useful. I have owned more expensive primes and medium format and bigger. The D850 with the right big Lenses it is really fast. But is bigger and more expensive. Also the long race telephotos are distinctly heavier.
    Post edited by DaveyJ on
  • mhedgesmhedges Posts: 1,412Member
    D850 cropped to DX is basically the same as what you get with D500. It's not really true that D500 has a greater multiplier effect.
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,328Member
    If you plan on shooting a D850 in DX mode about 100% of the time to gain more "reach" with your lenses because you shoot birds, wild animals, or motorsports you may as well save about $1,000 and some weight by just getting a D500 rather than the D850 when you won't be using all those megapixels the D850 offers anyway. Additionally, the D500 has a more advanced AF system taken from the D5. As an all around camera good in all situations the D850 is superior. As a fast action, wildlife camera the D500 is superior.
  • SymphoticSymphotic Posts: 659Member
    edited February 19
    I own the D850, the D500, and the Z7. All are different beasts. I am not considering the Z50. The D850 is my industrial photography camera: it has the most flexibility and allows me more work more quickly on the job (writing manuals and instructional videos).

    The D500 stays home and is getting more use with my F-mount lenses, except for the wide angle lenses, which can only work well on the D850 (or on the Z7 with the FTZ adapter, but I don't use that anymore as I have great Z mount wide angle lenses.)

    My personal (travel) photography choice is the Z7. I enjoy long urban and country walks and I can carry the Z7 all day long. On occasion I go on foot for long distances for work: at those times I leave the D850 in the lab and borrow my Z7 from home.

    There are a lot of convenience features on the Z7 (besides the size and weight) that are making it more useful. The Z7 will be more useful when it has a dedicated macro lens, but since I have been known to do serious damage to cameras on the job the D850 stays here in the lab as it is a little cheaper to replace it than the Z7.
    Post edited by Symphotic on
    Jack Roberts
    "Discovery consists in seeing what everyone else has seen and thinking what nobody else has thought"--Albert Szent-Gyorgy
  • tc88tc88 Posts: 386Member
    edited February 19
    @donaldejose, even if your subject only fills a DX frame, there is benefit using D850.

    First, you have a wider view, so it's much easier to track and keep the subject in the frame, even if you are just targeting for a DX sized picture.

    Second, if the subject ends up to be off center, if you are shooting full frame, you can still crop and get a full DX picture instead of having a wing cropped, etc.

    Third, D850/D500 all have the same 153 points AF module.

    Lastly, we are talking about which camera is best for wildlife and sports capability wise, not which camera is cheaper. D850 pretty much renders D500 obsolete capability wise.
    Post edited by tc88 on
  • SearcySearcy Posts: 581Member
    edited February 19
    After shooting with a d7200 for 3 years I decided it was time to move to a full frame system. I was thinking of a D750 but then I shot one afternoon with a Sony a7R and was blown away with all the EVF concept could do for my style of shooting. Also the eyeAF seemed like something I would like.

    I was planning my switch when Nikon announced they would be introducing a new mirrorless system. So I waited and kept shooting with my trusty d7200.

    Last January I bought the Z6 and FTZ adapter having decided to stick it out with Nikon and reading a lot of specs and reviews of the new Z cameras. The adapter would allow me to slowly replaces my lenses. The EVF was superior to the Sony. The excellent video was the final deciding factor.

    There is a bit of a learning curve with the Z6. It requires a different shooting style than the D7200. The eye AF hasn't proven as useful, as I though it would. Ive used it and it's fun but not the game changed I had imagined. Single point focus on the Z6 isn't nearly as good as with the d7200 but once I got used to the idea of shooting in dynamic area focus I found that my hit to miss ratio improved to an acceptable level. Especially in low light conditions.

    I have now been shooting with the Z6 for right at a year. Some improvements I gained with the Z that I didn't expect over the d7200 is the great tilting touch screen and quick menus. I use these constantly. Also, my SB700 speed light has seen a lot more action with the Z6. I have had the speed light for 3 years but the TTL feature of the SB700 never seemed to work well with the d7200 so it stayed in the case 95% of the time. My last two events have been shot with the Z6, 24-70 f2.8S lens (which I traded my old F mount VR version for) and the SB700 and I'm so pleased.

    This week I added a second Z mount lens to my kit. Adorama had a used 35mm f1.8S for a deal. I grabbed it and now have two of my favorite lenses in Z mount. So I guess I'm committed to the idea now.

    I plan to shoot with the Z6 for some time. I'll look at replacing it when Nikon comes out with a Z body that can lock focus like a D5. Until then I plan to just improve my ability to shoot with the Z6 and add a few more lenses to the kit. I'd like to get the 85mm next.

    Toddzilla Low Light
    Post edited by Searcy on
  • donaldejosedonaldejose Posts: 3,328Member
    tc88: good points. Does the D850 have the same AF system as the D5? I thought only the D5 and the D500 shared that system.
  • PB_PMPB_PM Posts: 4,099Member
    DaveyJ said:

    To: tc88 Because I don't know of any race photo pros that use the D850.

    Go to a pro racing event, you won't find many crop cameras, be it D500s or otherwise either. You find mostly D4s, D5, 1Dxs class bodies, a good number of 5D MK IVs, maybe some D810s, but mostly the full size pro bodies.
    If I take a good photo it's not my camera's fault.
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